watson524

Help me rig the new boat

31 posts in this topic

Hi all,

So our new boat is expected to arrive in April sometime. Currently, we have a 30 year old boat with a simple engine so we carry limited tools/filters on board. As we start planning for the new season, I want to start thinking about what we may need for the new boat. We have to get more life jackets just because of the ability to have more people on board. I know we'll need a fire extinguisher even tho we'll have the auto system in the engine area. We have paddles already. Dock lines for tying up will have to be changed - what size diameter are recommended for a 26' boat? Would you do 3/8" or 1/2"? How 'bout fenders? We have ones on the floating dock but we also carry 6 in the boat for floating with others and if we do a dock and dine. Do we need bigger ones than we have for the boat now? What tools/filters do you carry? It'll be the Merc 8.2L 380HP engine. Actually saw it on a display at the NYC boat show this weekend, that thing looks big and complicated. Tho I'm happy to see they're putting the oil filter right up front now vs where it used to be.

It'll have a head which I am saying is only to be used in extreme emergencies but it's vacuflush so what kind of TP is used? We have a septic system at home so I'm used to sandpaper LOL! What other things might I need on the new one that I didn't much have to think about before?

thanks in advance!

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I know this will only stir things up but what is the big deal about using the bathroom, that's what it is meant for.  I don't understand why people say only in an emergency, you gotta go, you gotta go, they are built to be used.  Let people use them and you will have a much more pleasant outing.  My family and grandkids use ours all the time, I pump it out, clean it and we have many more hours on the boat.  Going to the bathroom is part of life, it all cleans up.  My 1996 is spotless, many people ask how old it is, cleaning a boat is a way for me to relax, let them use the bathroom and enjoy the boat the way it is meant to be used.  Please don't go nuts with replies, I just can't imagine telling my guests that they have to hold it as long as possible.  I even allow dock neighbors to use mine if they don't have one on their boat so they don't have to walk to the restrooms.

Enjoy the new boat, go with 1/2" dock lines

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1/2 dock lines.  Some guys like to use every spare inch to store extra parts and tools.  For me there is only so much that can be fixed on the water so a basic set of tools and parts is is it.  Set of screw, driver, allen wrench set, adjustable pliers.  Socket set with known sizes.  Duct tape, electrical tape, quart of oil and quart of drive fluid.  Impeller. Cutters.  Life jackets, a throw, two anchors.

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Get larger bumpers. I use four 10" on mine, 1/2 dock ropes. I suggest looking into an onboard battery charging system if you have electricity at the dock. I also carry a mask and fins and a sponge mitt for wiping the hull and drive down while at anchor. I also carry a second anchor to throw off the stern in certain wind circumstances. And a First Aid kit.

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Pretty much what soldier says.  I have one of those 100+ piece tool kits from Lowes on the boat.  I keep it in a tote and spray all the tools with WD40 to keep them nice an new looking.  Stuff in the engine bay below deck can get rusty due to humidity. I also keep any special tools like the prop wrench and a block off for the sea water pump.   I would add a spare sea water pump kit, spare belt and, as soldier indicates, some containers of spare fluids.  As for the rest of the boat, dock lines, up to 27' boat, the 3/8" line will be ok per some of the tables and charts I see.  We have 7/16" and 1/2" for our 30'.  Thicker lines are a bit more work to handle (coil up, store, etc) due to size and weight but needed for larger boats.   You also need to have enough life jackets for each person you will have on board as you indicated.  Some of the larger cruisers are Yacht Certified, so there is no capacity plate.  So you will have to use your judgement.  USCG will outline requirements for safety devices such as flares and fire extinguisher so check there to be double sure.  I think for 27' with engine suppression, you only need one additional extinguisher.  We have engine bay suppression but have three additional, one small in the galley, one small one at the helm and a large one in the cabinet in the cockpit.  In the event of a fire, you will be surprised on how fast a fire can grow, and how fast an extinguisher will run out.  

 

There is special toilet paper for marine heads.  West Marine sells it and so does Walmart in the RV section.   The key on the marine head is to avoid any of the feminine products.  Only what comes out of the body and the special TP.  As Pgeiser says, its easy to clean up the head and get it pumped out.   as it Look around for pump out stations.  Some are free or only a few dollars if you purchase fuel.  We use a local municipalities pump out station.  I think its like $5 or $10.  We did it once last season so its not going to break the bank. Make sure your level indicators, if equipped work.  Ours does not, so I make checking the level part of my routine  check before we cast off.  Other thing we considered with having a head on board is we purchased environmentally friendly soaps and shampoo.  Probably overkill, but it wasn't much money from online source.  

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4 hours ago, Pgeiser said:

I know this will only stir things up but what is the big deal about using the bathroom, that's what it is meant for.  I don't understand why people say only in an emergency, you gotta go, you gotta go, they are built to be used.  Let people use them and you will have a much more pleasant outing.  My family and grandkids use ours all the time, I pump it out, clean it and we have many more hours on the boat.  Going to the bathroom is part of life, it all cleans up.  My 1996 is spotless, many people ask how old it is, cleaning a boat is a way for me to relax, let them use the bathroom and enjoy the boat the way it is meant to be used.  Please don't go nuts with replies, I just can't imagine telling my guests that they have to hold it as long as possible.  I even allow dock neighbors to use mine if they don't have one on their boat so they don't have to walk to the restrooms.

Enjoy the new boat, go with 1/2" dock lines

We use our head all of the time.  Like you said, that's what it's there for.  And with the vacuflush, it's not like you have to touch anything.

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I have not read every word from the above post. But yes, at least 6 1/2"x 25 foot dock lines and one 50 foot one. I use four 8" fender on my 29 footer to find them to work out great.

VHF, fish-finder and GPS is a must for me. A fish-finder will show you the contour of the bottom.  I would also install an extra pump, Cheap Ins. if you ever took on water!! .

Install LED lighting were needed. Fuel filter, impeller, oil, if its a closed system (I hope it is) a qt. of coolant/AF, spare SS hose clamps, a small tube of 3M's 4000 fast cure, wire connectors.  Install 4" cleats where needed to hang finders.

I would also consider an extra battery to run the house or for starting. Battery management is another consideration. Meaning, is the on-board charger big enough? Charging all the batteries when under way with a combiner or VSR. 

And I am sure theirs more................. 

 

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9 minutes ago, Iggy said:

I have not read every word from the above post. But yes, at least 6 1/2"x 25 foot dock lines and one 50 foot one. I use four 8" fender on my 29 footer to find them to work out great.

VHF, fish-finder and GPS is a must for me. A fish-finder will show you the contour of the bottom.  I would also install an extra pump, Cheap Ins. if you ever took on water!! .

Install LED lighting were needed. Fuel filter, impeller, oil, if its a closed system (I hope it is) a qt. of coolant/AF, spare SS hose clamps, a small tube of 3M's 4000 fast cure, wire connectors.  Install 4" cleats where needed to hang finders.

I would also consider an extra battery to run the house or for starting. Battery management is another consideration. Meaning, is the on-board charger big enough? Charging all the batteries when under way with a combiner or VSR. 

And I am sure theirs more................. 

 

to the dock lines.  4 should be minimum.  Although 80% of the time youll probably use two and from my experience shorter ones say 15ft are more applicable.  25ft lines tend to be a bunch of extra rope laying all over.  Id probably go two 15s two 25s and a 50.  If you have two anchors you could always that line.

 

Anchor line should be 100ft minimum with 4-5feeet of chain.

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18 hours ago, soldier4402 said:

to the dock lines.  4 should be minimum.  Although 80% of the time youll probably use two and from my experience shorter ones say 15ft are more applicable.  25ft lines tend to be a bunch of extra rope laying all over.  Id probably go two 15s two 25s and a 50.  If you have two anchors you could always that line.

 

Anchor line should be 100ft minimum with 4-5feeet of chain.

When I tie up, broad side, I use at least 4 lines. When in a slip, 2 lines across the stern in a X, 1 spring line from a stern cleat to a dock cleat that is forward towards the bow. One spring line mid-ship to a dock cleat that is astern on the dock. Making another X. One from the bow cleat to a dock cleat is no less than 10 feet away to hold the bow in and yet as a spring. Than if I can, On the opposite side, from the mid-ship cleat to the dock pull the boat away from the dock. A total of 6 lines in all. If the water and or wind picks up, you don't want the boat, fenders too, banging against the dock.

I do suggest, 25 foot lines. First off, the longer the spring lines the better. Less were on the lines and your cleats. Also, when you go to other places. You don't know where the cleats will be. That extra 10 feet, you may need and the price differences is nothing vs not reaching a cleat.

As to the anchor rode, it depends on where you go. But I would suggest, 200' of 1/2 and at least 20' of chain. That 20' of chain does 2 things. Keeps the shank down so the anchor will not pull out and will absorb any shock from the waves or wind pulling on the boat helping to keep the anchor in place. In a storm, you will be glad you had it.       

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Another tip on lines, I bought a couple of sets of lines.  I leave a set on the dock at our slip and I always have a set on the boat for when we tie off somewhere else.  The lines at the dock are all set length wise so the boat is always in the same spot when we come back home.  

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15 minutes ago, Roady68 said:

Another tip on lines, I bought a couple of sets of lines.  I leave a set on the dock at our slip and I always have a set on the boat for when we tie off somewhere else.  The lines at the dock are all set length wise so the boat is always in the same spot when we come back home.  

I second that.  If you are wet slipping your boat it is easy to have separate lines for your slip that you just hook to the boat cleats when you return.  I have traveling lines for when I am away from my slip.

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14 hours ago, IdahoPearl said:

I second that.  If you are wet slipping your boat it is easy to have separate lines for your slip that you just hook to the boat cleats when you return.  I have traveling lines for when I am away from my slip.

Yes! So your not re-adjusting the lines.

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1 hour ago, Iggy said:

Yes! So your not re-adjusting the lines.

I fourth this one!  Last season was our first with a dock, and after about 2 trips out we set up a 'permanent' set of lines on the dock that we can just slip on the cleats when we come back.  Fenders too--having a separate set of big fenders strung on the dock is a wonderful addition.

It makes life so much more pleasant going in and out.

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 Dock lines.  My age will show. 80 

I only use Nylon, double braided. SOFT on any ones hands in wind or currents. As they try to stop the boat from crashing or drifting away.

All / both sets, of dock lines & 2 SPARE lines are 10' longer than the boat. That allows the making of 2 sets of spring lines in rough weather. The 2 spares are for a crook stealing a line or 2. Been done.

Either a long bow & stern X. With a CENTER  X .  

OR   

 The bow lines in a X  and the stern lines in a X.  ............. I sometimes use either type.

Fenders on all the boats are white 10 " diameters and sealed in air. White color gets a raw bleach cleaning when smuged up.  I changed all cleats to the larger sizes & backing plates the cleats have a center hole closed at the top. I pass the factory loop thro the hole the loop the line over the 2 horns. Have never pulled out or jumped off in 2 to 3 ' waves while docked for hours in a storm. I usually have at least 2 FULL SIZED cleats added on each side.  Fenders have 2 lines on each one. 1 hanging vertical line. AND ...I use fenders with a hole at each end.... AND  lines thru each fender hole. They allow the fender to float....HORIZONTALY ....  They do not jump up on to a dock if a large storm or boat wake lifts the boat high enough.  Leave plenty of slack on the 2 horizontal fender ropes.

Rope lengths. I have had the worn out ends of the 300' anchor line repaired into  3 ...90' lines. The sail shop people made new looped braided ends on ALL ends.  That allows adding lengths as needed by water depth. Simply slide another line loop thru the anchor line loop. Then push the added line end thru  the  new loop at the end of the anchor line. Add as many as needed.  All chain & THREADED shackles at each end are Stainless Steel.  I have a second set of anchors, chain shackles & looped lines.  Yes I had to cut a hole setup loose in deep water. Anchor was trapped down there.    I turned the fish finder to manual gain & very high.  Sure looked like a huge school of fish.  But was a commercial BIG fishing  net. I now do a circling search for nets before lowering anchor.

I only carry Fiberglass tape & electricians MASTIC PADS to stop any liquid leaks............VHF radio & full length antenna plus a spare cell phone are only real spares. Never broke down away from the docks. Never towed back.

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None of us pay for a tow if needed.  We all respond to another in need.  Works.

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Thanks for all the great advice! Please keep it coming if anyone thinks something critical was missed. Re: the head, I'm sure we'll use it, but we insisted on the vacuflush because there was no way I was dealing with a bucket lol! Being on a septic system my whole life, there's not even a second thought about feminine products going in a toilet. 

MSII - do you have a fresh water system too? I'm thinking we'll just periodically swing by Lighthouse periodically for pump out and maybe a water fill? Or just bring jugs or something to add to the system. 

With the vaccuflush, how long can "stuff" stay in the holding tank? I mean I know there's a max level but do you pump after each use or.....

Maybe all these years I've made an assumption I shouldn't have but we have dock lines and we have boat lines. Our dock lines stay at the dock and just have hooks on them (we're bow in now, that'll change) so we just have a line up front that stays hooked to either side of the front and then we just clip to the bow eye and then either side of the fingers in the back and hooks go to the points in the back of the boat. Then we have 6 - 1/2" x 25' lines in the boat with a loop factory made in them for raft ups. It never occurred to me that some people don't just keep their dock lines fixed in place. What a PITA! 

Our 6 fenders we carry on the boat I THINK are the 6 1/2" diameter Taylor made ones but I'll have to check. Last year we put things right on the dock which was awesome! Didn't have to hang the fenders on the way in. The new boat will have 8 pull up cleats so either way, we should be ok there.

I'll have to get a tool set together since we carry very limited things now. I for some reason thought on the B3 the impeller couldn't be changed in the water, is that not the case maybe? In which case I'll definitely carry a spare. Anchor comes with the boat because it fits in the locker. I've never really had to do much anchoring so that's something we'll need to practice with and we'll plan on 100' of rode and some chain. The deepest we'd be anchoring in is maybe 30 - 40' (for now) so I may do 100' with a shackle on the top in case another line had to be clipped on to it. But I'm glad someone mentioned a second anchor, that could be good to have just in case even if it's just because the bottom eats my primary one (lots of fallen trees in our lake)

No power allowed on our docks or any on the lake (which is odd since the lake is owned by a power company, you'd think they'd happily sell us power back) so an onboard charging system won't work.

We will technically be yacht certified but I'll still plan to pick up some of the "cheaper" jackets to have on hand in addition to the 6 good ones we have now. We don't really do any water sports tho with easier access off the platform, that may change. I'd love to get back on skis but with bad knees and too much beer, not sure how that'll go lol!

We're having the GPS put in it and while our lake doesn't really have use for VHF (except hailing TowBoat US, of which I'm a proud member on channel 16) but I do plan to pick up a portable one especially for when we get to traveling with the boat.

I will have to figure how to tie up at dock. We'll be stern in so I get the crossing in the back but I'm not sure there's a good way to cross up front. We have very little wake as we're well in the no wake zone  and no tide to worry about but I do plan to have a spring line from the end of the dock that I can pick up and put mid-ship on the cleat near the helm on the way in. I'll have to take a look at how some of the others tie up near us. 

Guess I'll be getting a shopping list together!

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Dock lines; I carry 2 different colors, Gold ones are 15' the white ones are 25 or 30'. That way I can grab the right length for the task. 3/8 or 1/2 both work your choice.

A basic 80 pc tool set should be fine, a pump-out fitting, Crescent wrench, screw drivers, Allen set. After you get the boat get your nut-driver set out and check every hose clamp. There are stories of one being loose somewhere. I carry a qt of engine oil never opened it, I also carry a qt of out-drive gear lube, this I have used, ask the dealer to give you one. 

As for the Vacuflush use with RV paper, we have one and never regretted it. I leave the switch ON at all times. The only time it gets turned off is when the master battery switch is off.

 

 

.

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My boats 10 years old I change the impeller every 3 years, every one one I've changed looks like the one I put in. No need to carry an extra, IMO.

Fenders I carry 4, I added Taco Marine fender clips just in front of the midship cleat. I wil be adding another set aft.

https://www.amazon.com/Taco-Metals-Marine-Stainless-Release/dp/B00S80R4JY/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1517536625&sr=8-12&keywords=taco+marine

 

large.fullsizeoutput_f67.jpeg.dc18312b0c4f1ab3e0aea222133a8b78.jpeg

 

 

.

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Buy a extendable line pole . They have a type with a hook or a loop of plastic covered wire to grab a piling or pick a line loop off of the piling. Friend has a pole with screw on ends for his pole.  Carries both tips on the boat. If locked & stiff enough the poles can be used to slow a crunching to a dock. A looped end is best then. Loop the loop over a dock cleat & slow the boat.

 

Edit   I have a septic system at home the softer toilet paper softens easily.  We had a India couple that plugged the toilet instantly. Seems they were taught to wind a grapefruit sized layer of paper over their wiping hand. Wipe themselves then drop it into the toilet. The 3 of us had a " show & tell " session of how big a wad to use on a boat. I discovered the village did not have American toilets.  Paper & bushes were the normal. I shortened the cruise for them.

Almost forgot !   I carry a small can with a lid just for the ladies & seniors with pads & plastic applicators.  The can WILL save a trip. Do not leave the dock without one.  :)

 

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Lots of good suggestions here, but you don't really tell us much about the lake you'll be on. That will make a big difference as to what you need to carry. On my lake, I'm almost never out of sight of the shore, so I'm not likely to get "stranded". For tools, I carry two screwdrivers, a crescent wrench and extra oil and gear lube.  That's it and I've never used anything other than the screwdrivers.  Of course I carry lines ,fenders, lifejackets, and required safety equipment, too. And a cell phone,

With a new boat, you're likelihood of a breakdown is relatively low. Focus on having the items on board that you'll actually use and things your passengers will enjoy and appreciate.   Sunscreen, chapstick, an extra hat or two, extra sunglasses. Nice, big fluffy towels (everybody loves nice towels!!),  some waterproof bags.

I also tell my passengers not to bring anything with them. No big duffel or beach bags, no coolers, no nothing. Bring your wallet or purse, I'll handle the rest. I always ask them about their preferred beverages, too. I'd rather buy those in advance and have the cooler packed when they get there and not have to try to figure out places to store 4 coolers of varying sizes that everyone wants to bring.   Most people want to bring stuff, but it just takes up room and they end up hauling most of it back home. Remember, we're going to be out for an afternoon (or maybe even an entire day). This isn't a 7 day cruise!!

 

 

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11 hours ago, watson524 said:

Thanks for all the great advice! Please keep it coming if anyone thinks something critical was missed. Re: the head, I'm sure we'll use it, but we insisted on the vacuflush because there was no way I was dealing with a bucket lol! Being on a septic system my whole life, there's not even a second thought about feminine products going in a toilet. 

MSII - do you have a fresh water system too? I'm thinking we'll just periodically swing by Lighthouse periodically for pump out and maybe a water fill? Or just bring jugs or something to add to the system. 

With the vaccuflush, how long can "stuff" stay in the holding tank? I mean I know there's a max level but do you pump after each use or.....

Maybe all these years I've made an assumption I shouldn't have but we have dock lines and we have boat lines. Our dock lines stay at the dock and just have hooks on them (we're bow in now, that'll change) so we just have a line up front that stays hooked to either side of the front and then we just clip to the bow eye and then either side of the fingers in the back and hooks go to the points in the back of the boat. Then we have 6 - 1/2" x 25' lines in the boat with a loop factory made in them for raft ups. It never occurred to me that some people don't just keep their dock lines fixed in place. What a PITA! 

Our 6 fenders we carry on the boat I THINK are the 6 1/2" diameter Taylor made ones but I'll have to check. Last year we put things right on the dock which was awesome! Didn't have to hang the fenders on the way in. The new boat will have 8 pull up cleats so either way, we should be ok there.

I'll have to get a tool set together since we carry very limited things now. I for some reason thought on the B3 the impeller couldn't be changed in the water, is that not the case maybe? In which case I'll definitely carry a spare. Anchor comes with the boat because it fits in the locker. I've never really had to do much anchoring so that's something we'll need to practice with and we'll plan on 100' of rode and some chain. The deepest we'd be anchoring in is maybe 30 - 40' (for now) so I may do 100' with a shackle on the top in case another line had to be clipped on to it. But I'm glad someone mentioned a second anchor, that could be good to have just in case even if it's just because the bottom eats my primary one (lots of fallen trees in our lake)

No power allowed on our docks or any on the lake (which is odd since the lake is owned by a power company, you'd think they'd happily sell us power back) so an onboard charging system won't work.

We will technically be yacht certified but I'll still plan to pick up some of the "cheaper" jackets to have on hand in addition to the 6 good ones we have now. We don't really do any water sports tho with easier access off the platform, that may change. I'd love to get back on skis but with bad knees and too much beer, not sure how that'll go lol!

We're having the GPS put in it and while our lake doesn't really have use for VHF (except hailing TowBoat US, of which I'm a proud member on channel 16) but I do plan to pick up a portable one especially for when we get to traveling with the boat.

I will have to figure how to tie up at dock. We'll be stern in so I get the crossing in the back but I'm not sure there's a good way to cross up front. We have very little wake as we're well in the no wake zone  and no tide to worry about but I do plan to have a spring line from the end of the dock that I can pick up and put mid-ship on the cleat near the helm on the way in. I'll have to take a look at how some of the others tie up near us. 

Guess I'll be getting a shopping list together!

yes, I have fresh water system & vacuflush.  I Don't get mine pumped out until it's full.  They charge $25 on our lake!  At that time, if I need fresh water, I'll fill it up.  They all have a hose you can use.

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2 hours ago, newboat2016 said:

Lots of good suggestions here, but you don't really tell us much about the lake you'll be on. That will make a big difference as to what you need to carry. On my lake, I'm almost never out of sight of the shore, so I'm not likely to get "stranded". For tools, I carry two screwdrivers, a crescent wrench and extra oil and gear lube.  That's it and I've never used anything other than the screwdrivers.  Of course I carry lines ,fenders, lifejackets, and required safety equipment, too. And a cell phone,

With a new boat, you're likelihood of a breakdown is relatively low. Focus on having the items on board that you'll actually use and things your passengers will enjoy and appreciate.   Sunscreen, chapstick, an extra hat or two, extra sunglasses. Nice, big fluffy towels (everybody loves nice towels!!),  some waterproof bags.

I also tell my passengers not to bring anything with them. No big duffel or beach bags, no coolers, no nothing. Bring your wallet or purse, I'll handle the rest. I always ask them about their preferred beverages, too. I'd rather buy those in advance and have the cooler packed when they get there and not have to try to figure out places to store 4 coolers of varying sizes that everyone wants to bring.   Most people want to bring stuff, but it just takes up room and they end up hauling most of it back home. Remember, we're going to be out for an afternoon (or maybe even an entire day). This isn't a 7 day cruise!!

 

 

yes, the lake she is on (and me) is small.  I haven't had my hand held VHF out of the bin in 8 years.  Haven't even charged it.  We are within cell phone range of Tow Boat US.  I carry a full tool set and critical spare parts cause I'd rather try to fix something than get towed in.  I've changed an IAC on the water once after it fried itself and smoked up the whole boat.

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5 hours ago, newboat2016 said:

Lots of good suggestions here, but you don't really tell us much about the lake you'll be on. That will make a big difference as to what you need to carry. On my lake, I'm almost never out of sight of the shore, so I'm not likely to get "stranded". For tools, I carry two screwdrivers, a crescent wrench and extra oil and gear lube.  That's it and I've never used anything other than the screwdrivers.  Of course I carry lines ,fenders, lifejackets, and required safety equipment, too. And a cell phone,

With a new boat, you're likelihood of a breakdown is relatively low. Focus on having the items on board that you'll actually use and things your passengers will enjoy and appreciate.   Sunscreen, chapstick, an extra hat or two, extra sunglasses. Nice, big fluffy towels (everybody loves nice towels!!),  some waterproof bags.

I also tell my passengers not to bring anything with them. No big duffel or beach bags, no coolers, no nothing. Bring your wallet or purse, I'll handle the rest. I always ask them about their preferred beverages, too. I'd rather buy those in advance and have the cooler packed when they get there and not have to try to figure out places to store 4 coolers of varying sizes that everyone wants to bring.   Most people want to bring stuff, but it just takes up room and they end up hauling most of it back home. Remember, we're going to be out for an afternoon (or maybe even an entire day). This isn't a 7 day cruise!!

 

 

practical approach.  Kind of my thoughts.  If I cant fix it with a screw driver or wrench its not happening either why, so why bother hauling junk around.  Again always depends on where you boat, miles and miles away from shore, might want to be self sufficient.  But for me and most people I Know, boating is usually done within visual sight of shore.

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things that may help while on the water.  as others have said, small tool set to include adjustable wrench.  i always carry a qt of oil and a spare fuel filter, fuel is a common issue that doesn't take much room.  i have a plastic bin that i keep bungie corded in the ski locker.  also a good leatherman multi tool w/ a knife.  use that more than anything.  i find loose screws and i keep a tube of lock tite and a small tube of 5200 sealer for carpet screws that pop up, just take care of on the water and done.  1/2" size line is fine for a 26' boat

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