Hodge71

Trailer questions HELP!

9 posts in this topic

So I'm back with more questions on things. I'm looking at buying a couple different boats. Boat one is a 2001 Chappy 220 5.7 Alpha 1,  ESP and a trailer. The boat has around 600 very well maintained hours. Boat two is a 2001 Crownline 230 that is nice as well. Colored gel coat isn't quite as nice as the Chappy but its considerably cheaper, has a head and a ton of freeboard new bow and cockpit covers and they told me they'd buff the very small amount of oxidation off the green to get it shining, put new graphics on it and clean and detail the interior along with wax the whole boat before we picked it up. Boat 2 has a complete maintenance record book with receipts of work performed from the day it showed up at the dealer in July of 2001. It currently has 177.6 hours on the 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3 drive no ESP and no trailer. Thats were my problem lies. I know boats but not really trailers. The 2 boats I've owned came with trailers and I always just maintained them. The dealer speed them with the boat so it was never even a thought for me.

The dealer is telling me the trailer is a Load-Rite aluminum Elite roller with tandem axles and is rated for 6000 pounds. The trailer price is $4900 additional. I have had 1 roller trailer and 1 bunk trailer and had no problems with either. I'd like a galvanized bunk trailer rated for 6000 pounds. He's telling me that aluminum is superior to steel in every way. Im not a metallurgist but I do machining and welding and have a fairly deep knowledge of metals. I would never take aluminum where I could get steel. Normally aluminum is more expensive, less durable and more malleable (bendy). All things I dont want on my trailer. Weight is not an issue... I'm pulling with a 2014 Power Wagon rated for 10,680. It will yank the 5000 pound Crowline around very easily. 

 

So aluminum or steel? Why do I NEED and Elite with LED lights, radial tires, and composite rollers? Whats wrong with a 5 star  with carpeted pressure treated bunks with standard lights and bias ply tires rated for 6000 pounds? I really can't find a reason to justify an $1200 or more difference in price unless wiser minds tell me why. The axles and disc brakes on both trailers are the same so its apples to apples there. 

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Get your self a galvanized trailer with carpet bunk.  No need for aluminum or LED lights.  Roller trailers are really only needed when you are launching on short ramps where you need to roll the boat off the trailer a bit.  Generally low tides would affect this situation.  If your ramp has a long launch then regular bunk trailer will do fine.  I'd go for disc brakes on one or both axels though.  Not sure what your state requirements are in PA.  

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5 minutes ago, Jjlai724 said:

Get your self a galvanized trailer with carpet bunk.  No need for aluminum or LED lights.  Roller trailers are really only needed when you are launching on short ramps where you need to roll the boat off the trailer a bit.  Generally low tides would affect this situation.  If your ramp has a long launch then regular bunk trailer will do fine.  I'd go for disc brakes on one or both axels though.  Not sure what your state requirements are in PA.  

Pa state law requires brakes on all axles 

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I bought a 5 star from Dinbokowitz marine over in Allentown. He had the lowest price and was very easy to deal with. It was a 6000 lb trailer and was built well. I would definatly buy another.

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It is a trailer, and unless you are trying to make a statement by having a cool looking trailer I would go with the cheaper option since both has disc brakes.  Both will work well, as you know, in salt water. 

The aluminum trailer only has one real advantage:  weight.  It will be a lot lighter than the steel one, obviously.   But for a boat that size, it doesn't really matter much.

I personally do not like rollers, prefer bunks.

LED lights are nice if you tow a lot at night I suppose.  And they last forever, but really how much is that worth?

I think aluminum trailers look nicer, especially over a long period of time, vs galvanized.   They also tend to set the boat higher in my experience, so if you have a shallow ramp you have to back in farther.  My previous trailer was steel and it was great (until someone ran in to it and bent it all to #$^%), and my new one is aluminum.  And the only reason it is aluminum is that is what I found used and in excellent condition and price when I was replacing my original.  If I had found a steel one in excellent condition and price, I would have had no problems going that route.

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Updating to LED's later on is easy and cheap. Don't pay stealership mark up on them.

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1 hour ago, Mi3sons said:

I bought a 5 star from Dinbokowitz marine over in Allentown. He had the lowest price and was very easy to deal with. It was a 6000 lb trailer and was built well. I would definatly buy another.

The 1930 ss I had came from Dinbokowitz. Great people for sure. Has no used bow riders though...only Chappy cuddy cabins used. Bummer for me. I'd deal with them again too!

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28 minutes ago, Phillbo said:

Updating to LED's later on is easy and cheap. Don't pay stealership mark up on them.

For sure. I even put LEDs on my POS trailer. 

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