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Phillbo

Drowning does not look like Drowning

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Got the link elsewhere already but read it again just to make a mental memo to self. A stunning clash between casual observer perception/expectations and the reality of drowning.

I had seen this happening while sailing in my younger years ... I've got a girl out of the water just because it was the right and courteous thing to do. I only learned that she was actually drowning after the fact when she became quite dramatic after she got pulled back onboard. I had not known about the Instinctive Drowning Response then.

 

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Excellent information.  Unfortunately I nearly missed this thread in the current barrage of spam.

Thanks, Philbo.

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15 hours ago, Richard W said:

Got the link elsewhere already but read it again just to make a mental memo to self.

 

Yep , GFC ( of CSR) posts the same threads on multiple message boards. Good article.

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Wow, as a boater for the past 50 years I was absolutely taken aback by my own sterotypical thoughts of what drowning would appear like were I ever to witness it.  I took advanced lifesaving in high school and have been around the water my entire life yet this is the 1st time I've ever read something so vital.  I hope I never need this knowledge, but now that I have expanded awareness I'll have a different view of my surroundings. Thank you for sharing!

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Good article.  I wish it would be a mandatory read for all boaters.

I had an experience with a guest on our boat several years ago.  I'll call him Bill.  Bill is a big powerlifter.  He was out maybe 50 yards from our boat in water over his head with his 10 year old son.  We noticed his son climbing up on his head and pushing his dad under water.  They had a noodle with them, but it wasn't enough to keep him above water with his son pushing him down.  We noticed he was struggling so I threw a life ring to them, but it ended up about 25 yards away, so I jumped in to retrieve the ring and swim it to them.  I was able to get the son off his dad and onto the noodle, and get Bill on the life ring.  This is making my heart pound telling the story.  I dragged them both to shore.  Everything turned out OK.  I made two serious mistakes though.  I didn't put on a life jacket of my own before I hit the water, and I should have swum to them with the ring, it would have saved a lot of time.  Life rings don't fly where you necessarily want them to.  Oh, and the reason Bill's son was climbing on his dad's head was that his grandfather had told him that there were sharks in Lake Michigan and to be careful.  One more note...If someone comes close to drowning but seems to be ok, they are not necessarily so.  They could be at risk of dry drowning.  Dry drowning is the body's response to send fluid to the lungs to try to open up the vocal cords. But this can lead to excess fluid in the lungs — a condition called pulmonary edema. Symptoms of dry drowning usually start within an hour after a person is submerged in water.  Symptoms include trouble breathing, coughing, sleepiness, irritability, vomiting, and chest pain.  We nagged Bill to go to the ER to get checked.  All was well.

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 Diving in a deep motel pool with friends for tossed in quarters.

I can get those last 2. Exhaled at the bottom. Got the first  coin and  going to the last. Vision blurred. I lost surface reference.  PURE PANIC.  I settle to the bottom. Put both feet & both hands on bottom. Guess for vertical back & hands . Push &  I am moving.  Did I make it ?

I almost committed suicide in front of my family & friends.   LUCK is important in deep enough water.

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This article is making the rounds!  Just saw it posted on an email chain from a local marina.  Keep it going!

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