CruizinLG

Protecting my Gel Coat from Sun Damage & Oxidation

31 posts in this topic

I think your best bet is to just close off  the open side of of your carport somehow, either with a temporary or permanent siding.

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1 hour ago, dsmacey said:

What you have s normal after 600.  Once you get up to 1500+ it should be a lot better.  You may want to ho as high as 2000 or more.  Then after you polish it the shine should come back.  Wet sanding means wet, don't hold back on the water!  And if you can, use bottled water.  Hard tap water will not work as well.

 

Thanks David - that makes me feel better!   I used 600, then 1000, then 1500, and finished with 2000.   My right elbow is not happy with me!  The red is super smooth, and when I rinsed it down after each pass/section, the red really looks great....but then it dries and doesn't look so shiny red anymore.   We have soft water here and I used a spray bottle with a little bit of dishwashing soap added - which acts like a lubricant...from what I researched.   Now I'm just anxious to get the new polisher and see if I can get some good results.   I only have 9 days before we bring it to the lake for the season.

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i used to own a Crownline 225ccr, it was solid Ruby red.  Looked awesome in the spring after i used some oxidation remover with a wool pad.   I found 2 coats of Collinite 885 protected it until late August.   It was above the rub rail i experienced the most oxidation.  Also the side of the boat that had the southern exposure at the dock would oxidize more.   You are lucky, your red is not on the topside.   Build a boathouse.

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On my 220 last season which was the second season I owned it, I wanted to get the hull into better condition before I put it in the water for the year onto my boatlift.  The PO was meticulous about the interior but more laxidasical about the hull.  Luckily the hull is an easy fix whereas a poorly kept interior means new vinyl and trying to find obsolete parts that need replacing.  I ended up buying a polisher/buffer that was capable of spinning down to very slow speeds.  I did a wetsand to remove some minor dock rash then two grits of compound, polish and then wax.  Each chemical had its own specific type of pad and I used tons of them.  I believe I used 2000 grit which was more than adequate.  I can't imagine having used anything harsher than 2000 grit given how well it worked. I think I spent about ten hours on it to meticulously correct all of the issues and hit every bit of fiberglass above the waterline.  I don't anticipate doing this level of detail for many more years assuming I keep the boat.  

My take on this whole situation is a bigger take than just the skirt.  Sure, I'd come up with something to protect the unprotected side of the hull when it is under your carport, but the bigger thing is, just don't sweat the small stuff.  In a few years when it's time, give it a polish and don't worry.  I was the biggest small stuff 'sweater' in the world for years.  Gotta have everything perfect, can't compromise anywhere, but for me, life is so busy these days that I stopped borrowing trouble.  Maybe I need to correct some cumulative light wear down the road in one fell swoop, but that's fine.  

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On 5/17/2018 at 7:56 AM, Chaparral Rider said:

My take on this whole situation is a bigger take than just the skirt.  Sure, I'd come up with something to protect the unprotected side of the hull when it is under your carport, but the bigger thing is, just don't sweat the small stuff.  In a few years when it's time, give it a polish and don't worry.  I was the biggest small stuff 'sweater' in the world for years.  Gotta have everything perfect, can't compromise anywhere, but for me, life is so busy these days that I stopped borrowing trouble.  Maybe I need to correct some cumulative light wear down the road in one fell swoop, but that's fine. 

Could not agree more.

I know no matter what I do to prevent it, the sun will win.  Thus why after 8 years in the marina on a lift year round I had her wet sanded and polished this year.  Looks new again!  The before and after pictures are amazing.   I will still wipe her down each week, wax 2-4 times a year when I can.  I enjoy doing it.  But it just means I get to go 8 years again before I need to have her completely redone again.  

 

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