watson524

New boat is in the slip but boy do I need practice!

61 posts in this topic

Took delivery of our new 264 today. SWEET!!!! A few things the dealer has to work out (snafu at the factory about the carpet) but they've been great! I need to practice backing into a slip. Holy heck! We spent about an hour around a bouy working on it and it was windy as heck so I aborted 6 attempts before I got it reasonably close to where we could walk it in. This boat is a lot bigger than the old one and we firmly committed to "don't go any faster than you want to hit something". No scratches but man, when there's a lot of other boats around this is going to get dicey so practice, practice and more practice it'll be. All in all, a great day. Weather looks like crap tomorrow so we'll be practicing again on Sunday.

This thing has so many bells and whistles I don't know what to do with myself! Water temp, DEPTH!!!, apparently sonar which I had no idea the garmin would do, sinks and a head, all kinds of goodies to read the manuals on and get familiar with. Did a WOT for a very brief period since the dealer needs to confirm it's propped right as part of their checks so he waited until we were on board. Just have to keep it under 4k rpm for the first 10 hours then WOT for 5 minutes every hour for the next 10 and let me tell you, even at 3k rpm and a comfortable 32mph, this thing rocks!!

Anyone want to teach me how to back in? I will supply beer or bake cookies! LOL!large.5af640ed4ba65_boatinslip.jpg.571fac24be978dbd985a566a28f488f8.jpg

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Congrats!

Trim tabs up, drive fully down helps. You can always use a spring line if you come in crooked.

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You've got it... Slow and lots of practice. Don't be afraid to pull away and star over if it is not going well. Get an approach routine figured out. 

If you really want to master it, add another engine :)

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40 minutes ago, Toddavid said:

Congrats!

Trim tabs up, drive fully down helps. You can always use a spring line if you come in crooked.

Can't even get lined up enough to use a spring line to bring us in plus we're an 8.5' beam in about a 9.25' slip so a spring line will just stop the reverse movement once in the slip. I tried nose to far side of slip on the "channel" before I started my wheel turn/bump in gear maneuver and that put us too close to shore. Stopped further back and that didn't work either... We don't have prop walk as much with the dual prop but wow. 

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If all else fails in windy conditions, just come close enough so a mate can safely step from swim platform onto the dock, circle around and attempt again with mate protecting and assisting in guiding the boat into your slip. We do it like that whenever the prevailing winds stronger than 8 knots do not provide enough time to secure the lines before the bow is blown away from our dock.

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What you need is a fender cushion at the end of your finger to lean on until you get it down.

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Congratulations on the new boat!  The 264 is an awesome machine.

That is a very narrow slip to back in to.

 

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5 hours ago, Phillbo said:

What you need is a fender cushion at the end of your finger to lean on until you get it down.

Yeah we have corner cushions on the dock itself but plan to get them for the 4x4 uprights too. Ended up having my husband jump off once I got things mostly lined up and in the first attempts the dock pole/line hook was used a bunch. I need to get this so I can do it alone since I often go out by myself 

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5 hours ago, dsmacey said:

 

5 hours ago, dsmacey said:

That is a very narrow slip to back in to.

 

Ain't that the truth! Dock neighbor does the same in a crownline but I don't often get to see him. I have to figure out the "turn point" of the boat and I think aim that for mid slip when in the channel

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Buy 2 long BOAT HOOKS.  Fixed or extendable. They are available with screw on ends. Get the LOOP  and sharpened HOOK tips.  Some LOOPS are big enough to slip over the poles. Difficult to slip off in 2 seconds in a panic power application .  People need to know & do a quick toss the pole on the dock to prevent injury or damage.    Hooks are faster on & off of a pole.  Or dock boards.

I have never understood why people drive around with the pointy end of the boat first.

Then do a back into a space in reverse.  Is there a law of the sea stating. Do it the most difficult way possible.

I use the pointy ends in all weather & locations.  Chicken in wind & current.  Make all passengers walk the length of the dock. They need some exercise after sitting and eating for hours.

 I have never enjoyed backing in. Risk of a sterndrive or swim platform crunching is way to great. Modern boats have a blind area back there. Not good.

Have a alternate BIGGER slip to dock into bow first if you get caught in very high winds. I use the small  land space end of a commercial dock / pier. Ships block most all of the wind . Plenty of length to work with.  Cell phone cars.  Cost is some pizzas & case of beer.

 

Added information.

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29 minutes ago, cyclops2 said:

I have never enjoyed backing in. Risk of a sterndrive or swim platform crunching is way to great. Modern boats have a blind area back there. Not good.

For us we almost have to back in to even get on plus I don't trust having that much stick out the end at full width. Our new boat is max length allowed in our slips and it'd assumed the bow will stick out. I'm going so slow that I don't fear the crunching especially with the spring line to stop the rearward motion. 

You're right about the blind spot tho. I can't see any of the swim platform or rear facing seat from the helm so I assume 6' extra beyond what I see. Which scares me in turns at dock area for fear of whacko go the platform but I made several u turns between us and the next dock (VS going all the way to the open water at the end) and that went fine so... 

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My boat is a pain in the butt in reverse. I'm going into a new slip this week and I  am not certain how this will go. Like you, I'll have to practice. A twin would make all the difference in the world.......next year.

I'm not even certain how much clearance I'll have between me and the other boat. The floating dock has rub rails on them but I have two that maybe I can attach to decrease the potential for scratches. We'll find out this week. 

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My solution is to have a midship choker line with a loop at each end. Pre attached on the midship boat cleat as we are passing the middle dock cleat.  We hook it on a cleat to stop the boat if a platform is blind.  Positive stop in bad winds blowing you back. Tie up the spring lines. Remove that midship choker line.   Good enough for me on a blind platform boat.

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Yep I have no problem there as I have a line on the post at the end of the dock with a loop that I put around the helm area cleat to stop backward motion so no crunch on the rear end. My problem is getting actually lined up to the slip to back in. I watched some more videos and I think maybe I'm trying to turn 90 from perpendicular and I shouldn't be no come down the fairway and our slip is to port. I feel like I should have the bow a bit to starboard to sort of already start the turn then stop, cut wheel to port and bump to reverse. What I was doing yesterday was coming in straight in the fairway, stopping, cutting wheel to port and bumping into reverse. Maybe starting with the bow already away from the slip would help. Definitely have to figure out pivot point or I'll always end up too high/low even if I can get lined up at the right angle 

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I have the same problem. 2    8.5' wide  boats with them fendered up 1.5' between the boats. We go in & out with both sides full fendered.

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Don’t back in.  Not sure why everyone thinks they need to always back in.  My 263....nose in.  

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I back mine in.  I'm in a double slip with a Mastercraft.  There is about a foot space between us.  Just keep practicing and you'll get it.  As for the "blind spot", the struggle is real.  Last summer while backing into a vacation house slip, i nailed my swim platform on the corner of the dock.  I swore I was clear but BAM!!   Very nice gouge!!

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Just now, MonkeySeaII said:

I back mine in.  I'm in a double slip with a Mastercraft.  There is about a foot space between us.  Just keep practicing and you'll get it.  As for the "blind spot", the struggle is real.  Last summer while backing into a vacation house slip, i nailed my swim platform on the corner of the dock.  I swore I was clear but BAM!!   Very nice gouge!!

If you're looking for some entertaining like we often watch at the ramps, feel free to sit out before the no wake zone ends LOL!

We have roughly the same sized boats, do you know where the pivot point generally is in reverse and forward? I feel like I need to aim that for the center of the slip area on approach

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35 minutes ago, watson524 said:

If you're looking for some entertaining like we often watch at the ramps, feel free to sit out before the no wake zone ends LOL!

We have roughly the same sized boats, do you know where the pivot point generally is in reverse and forward? I feel like I need to aim that for the center of the slip area on approach

when I'm backing in, I do a lot of forward/reverse, turning the wheel back & forth to keep the boat straight.  Just bumping it in/out of gear.  Slowly!  I never really focused much on the pivot point.

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I'm going out later today to practice again. The way noses stick out around our docks I have to get this down before the slips fill up 

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You'll get it. Go slow and there is no shame in a missed approach. Go around and try again if your not lining up like you want. 

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And all the bumping in and out of gear is OK on the outdrive gears? It's very short bursts to get it moving in the direct want. In forward it actually goes into gear at what I'll call idle speed (about 3.5mph) and then there's an area where that doesn't change and a decided area where speed increases 

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no, won't hurt it.  My boat is 10 yrs old.  And yes, don't worry about a missed approach.  I still to that sometimes

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I have a similar situation.  Our docks are floating, and one of the huge pilings the dock rides up and down on is in the back corner of the slip, so we have to back in too.  Compounded on that, our drive is single prop, and the direction of the prop walk is (of course) to pull the boat away from the dock.

Lots of practice (especially early in the morning when nobody's around AND the water is calm really pay off.  Looking at the size of your boat, a good, strong boat hook will also pay huge dividends, as if you're close, you can snag a cleat on the dock with the boat hook and pull the boat close.  Given how tight things are length wise, going to neutral (or engine off) and using the boat hook or a line for the last few feet will prevent smacking the drive too.

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