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watson524

New boat is in the slip but boy do I need practice!

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I've always said there's no shame in lining in a boat if necessary.  But my boat is much smaller.  Use care . . . 

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I have the EXACT boat!  Yes it has taken a lot of practice and it still sometimes is just not right.  I have found that I was coming in too close the row of slips and it was hard to make the pivot turn.  I moved a bit farther out to the center of the channel and then hit reverse to stop as much forward motion.. then start he pivot turn with turning wheel hard to starboard and bumping reverse for 2 sec.  then hard to port and bump to forward.  then i find I am fairly lined up and I can drive it in in reverse adjusting as necessary.  I have also used the pylon as a pivot.  the rub rail is pretty stout.  Although, i did put a gouge on the rub rail from a piece of metal sticking out on my slip...I was pissed!  but thank god it was on the rub rail and not the fiberglass.  My boat is a 2018 as well...Just got it in sept...  my first boat so I am learning a LOT

Jonny

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2 hours ago, watson524 said:

Lining? 

Tossing a line to someone on shore to help pull; or putting someone off your boat for same.  But at some point a boat is too heavy for that.  But even putting a passenger off so they can help fend the boat can help.  Again, with larger boats and wind one (or even two) may not be able to do much, and they could get hurt trying.

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I let my wife dock the boat. That way, it is her fault...

:)

brick

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Go bow first

docking lights wont help much in the dark, if you back it in.

 

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 My wife uses Echo Location  at night & in heavy fog.

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1 hour ago, rreale said:

Go bow first

docking lights wont help much in the dark, if you back it in.

 

The boat is too long for the slip. Bow in and they can not get on and off the swim platform. 

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3 hours ago, Jonny40QBH said:

I have the EXACT boat!  My boat is a 2018 as well...Just got it in sept...  my first boat so I am learning a LOT

Congrats! Great ride eh? Take a look for some other posts I need to make if you don't mind on some things we noticed on our second trip out today.

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2 hours ago, Futzin' said:

Tossing a line to someone on shore to help pull; or putting someone off your boat for same.  But at some point a boat is too heavy for that.  But even putting a passenger off so they can help fend the boat can help.  Again, with larger boats and wind one (or even two) may not be able to do much, and they could get hurt trying.

Ah ok. So far I've left my husband in charge of using the pole as needed to keep us out of trouble. This boat definitely can't be manhandled the way the old one could

 

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Went out today and pulling out was fine (I was a bit worried). I just pulled straight forward and then cut to starboard bumped forward, then cut to port and bumped in reverse to then drive ahead. Our area is too narrow I think to just pull out and turn to starboard as I go.

Coming in, I had one aborted attempt, went out, made a K turn to come back down and got it on the second try. It wasn't pretty but nothing go scratched. Now, if my neighbor was there with his nose sticking out, I probably would have had to abort again to be safe but that gave me some extra room and I was able to get it in enough to get the mid cleat line on and then back into the slip the rest of the way with my husband on pole duty. 

I definitely have to come down the lane to the opposite side of center from our slip and then just before the slip, I turned away from it so that I was already facing away and then the first cut of the wheel to port and the bump into reverse got us even more angled the right way.

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All else being equal, I think I'd prefer to approach tight to the helm side, but that looks like a no go.  I've almost no experience backing into slips, much less one that narrow.  I don't envy you guys.

And oh yeah, that's a beautiful boat!  Congrats.  Make sure to lay on plenty of wax to that blue strip above the rub rail throughout the seasons.  Good cove activity for me.  I get antsy and have start futzin' with stuff after sitting for a bit.

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2 hours ago, Phillbo said:

The boat is too long for the slip. Bow in and they can not get on and off the swim platform. 

Also we don't really need the docking lights. There's lights on the shore above our marina that the NFL would be jealous of at Sunday nite games

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15 minutes ago, Futzin' said:

All else being equal, I think I'd prefer to approach tight to the helm side, but that looks like a no go.  I've almost no experience backing into slips, much less one that narrow.  I don't envy you guys.

And oh yeah, that's a beautiful boat!  Congrats.  Make sure to lay on plenty of wax to that blue strip above the rub rail throughout the seasons.  Good cove activity for me.  I get antsy and have start futzin' with stuff after sitting for a bit.

Yeah it's all sort of tight but I do tend to favor that side so I can pick up the line to put on the cleat right near me there. 

It's funny you mention the wax.... we went with the Vapor color scheme to have less to fade and we will likely use the full mooring cover most of the time (our old boat only had a full mooring cover and that gel coat was great!) to help with fading BUT, today was "load the boat with things we need on board" part 1. We put in bins and whatnot for drive oil, engine oil, PS/trim fluid and then also things like koozies, sunscreen, our Pro Polish and the soft towels for buffing plus the vinyl cleaner and protectant. We tend to do that kind of work while sitting in the cove too..

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Gel coat color below the rub rail isn’t really the issue, it’s the color that’s in direct sunlight: the blue stripe above the rub rail. It will get sun beaten pretty quickly and oxidize if you don’t keep on top of it, much quicker than a wide band colored hull. Keep it sealed.

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Yep, Pro Polish was my product of choice on the old boat (and Buff Magic if needed) so I'm going to keep the same regimen here.

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I didn’t look those products up, but anything with “buff” or “polish” in their names is most likely not a sealant.

Those are preparation type abrasives, made to smooth the gel coat or paint before sealing, to create a flat and reflective surface.

Careful over-using polishes, as they remove a tiny bit of gelcoat material each time you use them.

You want a marine wax, or better yet a polymer like Sonax Netshield, to seal and protect from UV.

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The pro polish is a polymer sealant. I think they also have something called pro sealant that I started seeing this year but I don't know if it's just new packaging or what. 

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My Alpha One does not tolerate shifting of any kind every two seconds. Many times I've had to hit the big red panic button and shut off the engine to prevent plowing into the dock because the shift wouldn't go back into neutral.

The other quirk is that since I had the engine rebuilt several years ago, the exhaust is so strong that it will push the boat up to 1.5 mph while in neutral. This makes getting into a slip difficult. With the exhaust pushing the boat, and the boats momentum, the outdrive simply cannot override the momentum and I end up bumping the pole between me and the other guy. I use to be very good at docking. But since its repair, I look like a newbie.

My new slip is even tighter than the previous one. I had several yards of space between me and the other boat [a pole between us]. Now, only 2 feet depending on the neighbor.

i haven't seen the new guy yet but I'm also worried about his ability to dock and my nice looking gelcoat. 

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I have a v drive so my approach might be different(no useable steering in reverse)

I have found it the easiest to swing the swim platform as close to the slip as possible while moving forward turning away from the slip.  Just get the boat floating in the right direction and give it little bumps of the trottle to keep it headed there slowly on the right path. Have a buddy standing on the swim platform.. as you get close move your steering to the other direction and start bumping it in reverse.  Have your buddy catch the dock and help you walk it in.  

 

I actually find this easier than pulling into the slip forward. 

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2 hours ago, SST said:

The other quirk is that since I had the engine rebuilt several years ago, the exhaust is so strong that it will push the boat up to 1.5 mph while in neutral. This makes getting into a slip difficult. With the exhaust pushing the boat, and the boats momentum, the outdrive simply cannot override the momentum and I end up bumping the pole between me and the other guy. I use to be very good at docking. But since its repair, I look like a newbie.

 

I get a little bit of this on my SX drive too.  It's not quite the speed you experience, but the boat does tend to creep forward when its idling.

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15 hours ago, watson524 said:

Ah ok. So far I've left my husband in charge of using the pole as needed to keep us out of trouble. This boat definitely can't be manhandled the way the old one could

I have found that is you replace the pole with someone holding a fender and then just place the fender between the boat and dock when a strike is immanent. .

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Neutral is your friend!!! When back into a slip, you bump into gear then right back to neutral.  Bump into gear, right back to neutral.  It's not a race, the slower the better.  Don't be afraid to pull back away from the slip and totally reset/start over.  Just remember, bump into gear then get back into neutral.  Get out on open water one day and practice out there.  I would also suggest bringing someone with you that is good at it, a local Captain if you will and have them teach you some tips/tricks.  My boat is 31 feet plus with my swim platform and the first time I backed into my slip there was a severe storm out, gusting winds and a strong current.  It took me over two hours to get her in.  But now after practice, I got it down pretty good.  Anyone that says they're were a pro on the first few times is FOS. 

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