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WaterDR

Docking....with wind and little room to maneuver

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Ok.....my boat is a 263 Sunesta.  350 with bravo 3.

My slip is not in the easiest spot.  Let me paint a picture.....

My Marina is pretty small.  It’s a inlet cove that is very narrow.  There are boats on both sides.  Our slip is near the end.  Think of a narrow rectangle where the back of the rectangle, there are also slips.

Winds typically blow in and if I blow past my slip, there is really not much room to correct.

So far, I am mooring bow in.  My slip is on the port side.  Basically, I have been hugging the left side of the channel and then getting my bow in the slip and using the midship bumper to twist me into the slip off the dock.

Question...is it easier to back into wind or go bow first?

trying to debate two approach options when it is windy.

Option 1....drive past the slip a small bit....then back in.

Option 2....back down the channel allowing the wind to push me....once just past the slip, drive forward into the wind into the slip.

The third option would be to simply drive down the channel with the wind at my back...and go in bow first, but worried that if I miss, I am screwed and won’t have much steering control.

Hope this makes sense...wish I had a picture to post or a drawing.

 

 

 

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I never back in with any wind.  I never even try to do a back in......... The maximum control of a boat is when you have wind or current or BOTH pushing on the bow / front of the boat.

That is a proven /  designed in fact. 

If the wind catches you coming home & is blowing straight down your approach slot ?............ I would swing my boat around in open water in front of your entrance slot. Let the wind blow me backwards as fast as I wanted to let it with my rudder & VERY EFFICIENT prop spinning in forward. Can you drift slightly past your space ? If yes? Do it. ...........I am talking about trying to dock in  a wind with NO BOAT next to you to be banged as you lose control.  I have no idea what amount of side clearences you deal with. I hang 4 ...8" or 10" fenders on each side. Plus 1 horizontal floater amidships.............That is for wind that the lookers are placing bets on to see how badly I will damage my boat.  I do not Continue in if I see danger.  I go to a commercial pier & tie up very easily between shore & the first freighter.

You can not / you should not do........... What has any risk to your boat or other boats..........Do not go out & then come back hoping you will get lucky with the wind. It never happens that way.  Do a morning check on the www.radar.weather.gov/Conus/full_loop.php      Weather & National Weather Service sites. They show The USA with wind & rain patterns. Updated every hour.

 

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I find that entering a slip with a headwind [which changes to a crosswind as you make the turn into the slip] offers better control of the boat than trying to enter with a tailwind. 

With my new slip and once the neighbor shows up, I will have to go past my slip and turn around so I have the headwind. As the headwind changes to a crosswind, this will help keep the bow from hitting the other guy as it pushes my bow towards the dock and away from the other boat.

Under the same wind conditions, if I tried to enter the slip with a tail wind and the other boat is there, there isn't enough space to get the boat turned into the slip and track straight. To get it to track straight into the slip will cause such a crab angle that I may either hit the other boat with the bow, or hit the dock on the opposite side of the boat. No win.

If you can keep control of your boat going backwards until you pass your slip, I would recommend that.

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Bow first.  if you pull into your slip under power, and then reverse it at the right moment.  anyway  you choose is gonna require practice.

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bow first would be my choice.  Harder to get the big square end of the stern in between two docks versus the small point of the bow.  After getting the bow in you can have helpers help pull you in or guide you in. 

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My situation sounds similar.  However, I approach from tight to the starboard dock then turn in early and slow to line up.  I let her drift into alignment then bump the throttle as needed.  My lift bunks catch and align me similar to trailer bunks, so that's a big plus at that point.

boat slip

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Do you have a finger on each side of your boat or just on one side?  And if not, is there a piling or pole between the two spots instead of a finger?

 

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I'd try going straight in and put it in reverse right before reaching the slip with enough gas that you just start going backwards. Then cut the wheel hard left and pull forward into the slip. That negates the wind and leaves you with a chance to correct if things go wrong.

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From all the pilots present. Taking off is optional. Landing is not.

Leaving the dock is optional.  Docking is usually not.  

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SO i think bow in is going to be easier.  It sounds similar to my slip.  So if i were you, I would come down the port side of the channel.  Right before my bow gets to the slip, I would turn the wheel all the way to starboard and bump into reverse for a second or 2 to swing my stern around.  When I am sufficiently lined up with the slip.   straighten up and pull in.  Even if your stern gets pushed passed a little you still should be able to steer in.  I am new to this but it has been working pretty well for my slip

Jonny

 

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19 hours ago, WaterDR said:

 My slip is on the port side.

 

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