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New Trailer Tires - Recommendations Needed

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14 hours ago, Futzin' said:

Marathons are discontinued...

Still available from Wal-Mart.  Either old stock, or they are still being produced only for them.  

 

My comment was directed at the fact that wally world offers road hazard on trailer tires and there is a walmart on nearly ever other corner.

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The only thing I would add to Brick's advice is going up a load range. Heat is the enemy of tires. The higher the load range rating the more heat tolerance you have. Considering boat trailering is mostly done during the hot summer months, I like it as additional insurance. I've been towing different types of trailers for 18 years and what I've learned through experience is that passenger tires tend to wobble/sway more when used on trailers because their sidewalls aren't as stiff (probably ok on a light single axle trailer, but I didn't like them on my dual axle trailers), proper inflation is key to reducing the heat in the tire, always carry as many spares as you have axles (when one tire goes out, all of that load goes onto the other tire(s) on that side and overloads it), and if you are going to be trailering in the heat, go up a load range. I've lived in MS, AL, AZ and FL for the past 20 years so the additional load range thing may only be applicable for those of us in the real heat. But since I've made that change, my trailer tire issues have gone away.

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On 6/8/2018 at 1:12 PM, Futzin' said:

My mistake.  Appreciate the heads up . . . 

No mistake, they are not listed on goodyear.com anymore so no telling how long they will be available from Wal-Mart.  The endurance seems to be a better tire on paper anyway.  

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Low  /    Not FULLY inflated  tire pressure kills / ruins most tires. 

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On 6/8/2018 at 6:59 AM, Dennis A said:

Still available from Wal-Mart.  Either old stock, or they are still being produced only for them.  

 

My comment was directed at the fact that wally world offers road hazard on trailer tires and there is a walmart on nearly ever other corner.

Enjoy those tires... not me.

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2 hours ago, cyclops2 said:

Low  /    Not FULLY inflated  tire pressure kills / ruins most tires. 

True...because those underinflated tires build excess heat vs a properly inflated tire.

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I got a set of Carlisle trailer radial HD 205/75R14, tires D rated for 2040 LBS at 65 PSI from Discount Tires two years ago, and have been happy with them.

Six years ago, I spoke with a Goodyear tire rep in Tennessee who told me that when they tested loaded tires just 10 PSI under inflated at 60 MPH, they had nearly a 50 percent failure rate in the first hour of travel.  He also recommended tire replacement every five years.  Tires have a stamped four number code on the sidewall.  The first two numbers are the week, and the last two are the year of manufacture.

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Thank you cleaver !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

That is the admission by a respected source.

He is telling all people that ST & trailer tires ARE  ARE extremely DANGEROUS.

10 psi low ?????????????   CRIPES  The errors that can all add up to those............. PLANNED BLOWOUTS.............. are designed into the crummy & dangerous tires. THERE ARE NO NO  NO safety standards for trailer tires !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

That is why GOOD trailer companies are PROTECTING CUSTOMERS with steel belted radial  CAR / AUTO TIRES.

I have driven a leaking auto tire with15 psi in it on a deserted interstate. Spare had almost the same pressure.  I am not perfect.  The tire was warm when I pulled over to see why the car steered different.

PUT THE AUTO TIRES on a trailer.  Stop depending on JUNK / NO SAFTY STANDARDS   trailer &  S T tires.  Why do you put the most dangerous tires on a trailer ?  OLD proven lies about dangerous tires with no standards.................. Tire companies make a ton of profit on all those 2 year old replacements.  Would you accept a car tire that blew out & needed replacement every 2 years ?

NO trailer tire is even close to a car tire.............. DOT DEMANDS no crap trailer tires on a car.  People drive underinflated & overloaded car tires for years every day. Fact of car tires & drivers.

Save a boat & trailer.............. Use a good car tire. Trailers are crap springs & no shocks. NO bars to make them stop waddling at 60 to 80 mph with gusts of side winds shoving them sideways or truck passing.

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Hey Cleaver...did the rep specify what kind of tires he was talking about? Your post doesn't say trailer or passenger tires that they tested 10 psi low that experienced the failures or if he was just talking about tires in general. Just curious,

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He didn't specify which tire, just that they were on a trailer loaded to the maximum weight capacity when tested.  He worked for goodyear, and I met him at the Mastercraft factory in Tennessee during training in 2012.  I'll look through my notes and get back with you if i have more info.

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I suspect speed rating has a lot to do with the disappearance of the Goodyear Marathons.  The standard speed rating for ST rated tires has long been 65mph.  I believe Carlisle was the first to market with higher speed ratings with their Radial Trail RH @ 81 mph.  They also offered several common trailer sizes in new higher load ranges For example the ST225/75r15 E.  Goodyear answered that with the Endurance with a speed rating of 87 mph.  Goodyear also offers the endurance in ST255/85r16 E with a load rating of over 4K lbs @ 87mph  I think some engineers got busy at Goodyear.

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23 hours ago, TNBrett said:

I suspect speed rating has a lot to do with the disappearance of the Goodyear Marathons.  The standard speed rating for ST rated tires has long been 65mph.  I believe Carlisle was the first to market with higher speed ratings with their Radial Trail RH @ 81 mph.  They also offered several common trailer sizes in new higher load ranges For example the ST225/75r15 E.  Goodyear answered that with the Endurance with a speed rating of 87 mph.  Goodyear also offers the endurance in ST255/85r16 E with a load rating of over 4K lbs @ 87mph  I think some engineers got busy at Goodyear.

In 2014 Goodyear issued a product service bulletin stating that if you increased the cold inflation pressure 10 psi above the labeled pressure that the speed rating could be increased to 75mph.  I have been doing this since i was informed as such.  

https://www.tirerack.com/images/tires/goodyear/Marathon_Special_Trailer_Applications.pdf

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anyone towing a trailer at 75 on up is nuts!  I don't go over 65-70 when I'm towing.  8K lbs is a lot to stop or make and evasive maneuver with doing 80 mph!!

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2 hours ago, MonkeySeaII said:

anyone towing a trailer at 75 on up is nuts!  I don't go over 65-70 when I'm towing.  8K lbs is a lot to stop or make and evasive maneuver with doing 80 mph!!

Call me nuts.  I frequently tow through-out the midwest between 72-76 mph, with an occasional excursion at or above 80, especially coming down a hill.  The semis weighing 10x are moving just as fast.  

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9 hours ago, Dennis A said:

In 2014 Goodyear issued a product service bulletin stating that if you increased the cold inflation pressure 10 psi above the labeled pressure that the speed rating could be increased to 75mph.  I have been doing this since i was informed as such.  

https://www.tirerack.com/images/tires/goodyear/Marathon_Special_Trailer_Applications.pdf

I had seen that bulletin somewhere as well.  

 

5 hours ago, Dennis A said:

Call me nuts.  I frequently tow through-out the midwest between 72-76 mph, with an occasional excursion at or above 80, especially coming down a hill.  The semis weighing 10x are moving just as fast.  

I've been known to break 80 on occasion as well, though I try and keep it a bit lower.  Back when I was a dumb kid, I used to pull overloaded work trailers at triple digit speeds, on bias ply tires no less.  I'm not in that big of a hurry anymore.  

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After numerous blowouts with various brands, I finally purchased Goodyear HMG 2020 tires from my local Goodyear store.  They are only available in size 205/75-14 and are D rated bias ply.  They say Property of U Haul on the side so I always kept the receipt in the glove box.  These tires are bullet proof and  have very tough sidewalls and tread.   They ride a little hard as a consequence.  I used them on why single axle trailer for my 1830SS with great results.  They were made in Canada; bought them 5 years ago and not sure if they are still available..

It's a nuisance but I now jack up the trailer in the fall and take off the tires for storage in the basement.  Cool, dry and let some of the air out and my tires seem to last forever now.      

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You are doing a excellent job of compensating for the poor quality of trailer tires.  The boat being a 1830 does a massive amount of reducing the load & stress on them.

Same reason my trailer tires last so long with a 16 Aluminum boat on it. No real weight.  The tires are12" auto tires. Max total weight is 700 pounds.

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19 hours ago, Dennis A said:

Call me nuts.  I frequently tow through-out the midwest between 72-76 mph, with an occasional excursion at or above 80, especially coming down a hill.  The semis weighing 10x are moving just as fast.  

they also have trucks 5 times the size with brakes and engine to match.  Think its been studied anything above 70 while towing just about anything with just about anything is unsafe.  Everybody think cool my truck is pulling this thing and were going 80 or yeah I got my diesel.  but that's fairly ignorant thinking.  Its about stopping and steering as well. 

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16 hours ago, Sacandaga said:

After numerous blowouts with various brands, I finally purchased Goodyear HMG 2020 tires from my local Goodyear store.  They are only available in size 205/75-14 and are D rated bias ply.  They say Property of U Haul on the side so I always kept the receipt in the glove box.  These tires are bullet proof and  have very tough sidewalls and tread.   They ride a little hard as a consequence.  I used them on why single axle trailer for my 1830SS with great results.  They were made in Canada; bought them 5 years ago and not sure if they are still available..

It's a nuisance but I now jack up the trailer in the fall and take off the tires for storage in the basement.  Cool, dry and let some of the air out and my tires seem to last forever now.      

Those were pretty tough tires.  I've run them on several trailers over the years.  Sadly, they were discontinued a few years ago.  

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17 hours ago, soldier4402 said:

they also have trucks 5 times the size with brakes and engine to match.  Think its been studied anything above 70 while towing just about anything with just about anything is unsafe.  Everybody think cool my truck is pulling this thing and were going 80 or yeah I got my diesel.  but that's fairly ignorant thinking.  Its about stopping and steering as well. 

I call BS on this.  What was the Study?  I pull my boat with a 3/4 ton truck.  There was a forum member here with the same boat that pulled his with a Toyota Tacoma.  You're telling me that if either of us were to travel @ 80 mph then we'd be flirting with disaster, but @ 60 its all roses?  I don't buy it.  In my opinion, there are other factors, that are much more likely to lead to an accident. 

Driver knowledge and experience?

Driver condition? (distracted, tired, intoxicated)

Trailer rated for the load its carrying?

Truck rated for the trailer its towing?

Weight Distributing hitch if required for the tow rating? (I bet there's a few here that might be guilty of this one)

The condition of truck, trailer, and towing equipment? (Steering components, Brake adjustment, Tire pressure, Hitch)

I'm not saying that speed isn't dangerous.  My point is that the increase in risk of a properly towed trailer at 80mph vs 60mph, is similar to the increase in risk of virtually any vehicle at 80mph vs 60mph

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Do not worry about going over 60 mph.

Logic dictates that if you slow to 60 from 80.  You are safe again.

I would not worry too much about the traveling speed at all.    What speed did you hit at is what counts.

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3 hours ago, TNBrett said:

I call BS on this.  What was the Study?  I pull my boat with a 3/4 ton truck.  There was a forum member here with the same boat that pulled his with a Toyota Tacoma.  You're telling me that if either of us were to travel @ 80 mph then we'd be flirting with disaster, but @ 60 its all roses?  I don't buy it.  In my opinion, there are other factors, that are much more likely to lead to an accident. 

Driver knowledge and experience?

Driver condition? (distracted, tired, intoxicated)

Trailer rated for the load its carrying?

Truck rated for the trailer its towing?

Weight Distributing hitch if required for the tow rating? (I bet there's a few here that might be guilty of this one)

The condition of truck, trailer, and towing equipment? (Steering components, Brake adjustment, Tire pressure, Hitch)

I'm not saying that speed isn't dangerous.  My point is that the increase in risk of a properly towed trailer at 80mph vs 60mph, is similar to the increase in risk of virtually any vehicle at 80mph vs 60mph

I would have to find it.  But the idea of I got a big truck so I can do this is ridiculous, I call BS on that.   All of the factors that you listed I 100% agree with and the fact that a F250 will stop better than a Tacoma, also agree.  And your point about a properly towed trailer and a regular passenger car being the same risk is BS.  On average a vehicle needs 180ft to stop at 60mph and it needs 320ft to stop at 80 mph, an almost 60% increase without towing.  That's not telling the whole story even a trailer with properly working brakes will probably increase your stopping distance by 50%, its possibly it might even double it.  So yeah without towing I can stop around 200ft with my vehicle at 60 and 300ft at 80mph, if I'm towing and going 80 I'm probably in the 500ft zone if not further and all of 300ft at 60, so yeah I would say the data says there's an increase risk even if your doing everything right.  Then if its wet you have to double it, snow etc. 

While I agree there are many factors that increase or decrease risk and being properly equipped plays a big part.  But pure physics says more weight equals longer stopping distance every pound or mph gained incrementally adds risks.  If were using the same vehicle going at different speeds I am adding at least 60% to my stopping distance between 60 and 80mph, you can compare different vehicles all you want that's a different argument, of which I agree with you.   talk about driver knowledge and skill is that guy in his F250 allowing 4-500ft or a football field and half distance between him and the next vehicle, doubtful?  When towing I find its more about others around doing what they do of which you cant control vs you being pro truck driver with top notch equipment.. So you can do everything right all you want its the next guy that you cant predict you have to worry about. 

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Surprised to see there's no mention of the bias ply vs radial debate in this thread ...  I've heard some say bias ply tires are better for tandem axle trailers.

How do you know what the proper inflation pressure is supposed to be?

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