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Considering purchasing a 1998 Chap 2330 5.7 Mercruiser Bravo 3 outdrive. Owner says 1100 hours on engine. Good, bad, neither?  Thanks. 

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Sight unseen, I'd say he's taken care of it to get it to that point.  I have 825 hrs on my 2006.  Some boats a few years old have 100 hrs or whatever and have been abused.  I'll take the boat that's been taken care of . . . 

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What he said!

thats low hours for age of boat.

In a car, that same engine would have thousands and thousands of hours on it.

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Is it the original engine ?

Condition is everything..............What a cheerleader tells me.

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My  85 has 1700 + hrs, mine has had a couple of hi-ups, but noting do to maintenance, or the lack there of.  Denny.

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Could be nothing wrong with it.  Anything over 1000 hours I would be inclined to have a mechanic do a compression test. 

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Knowing the maintenance history would mean a lot. That vintage small block would be needing a timing chain and valve guide seals even if it was taken care of. Not big jobs, but I agree a compression test is in order. Valve seals and timing chain are not big ticket items. On the marine side, ehaust manifold and riser inspection, and your engine coupler needs inspection as would the gimbel bearing, bellows, u-joints, and water pump 9impeller. W

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Not boat related but interesting to compare. I recently had a medium duty Diesel engine in a truck I own rebuilt. It had over 21,000 hours on it. DT466E Navistar. 

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13 minutes ago, CKSNAP said:

Not boat related but interesting to compare. I recently had a medium duty Diesel engine in a truck I own rebuilt. It had over 21,000 hours on it. DT466E Navistar. 

When I worked for Mobil, our line tractors were filled with Mobil Delvac One and other than changing the filters and topping off, the fleet never changed the engine oil and they went over 1,000,000 miles, so that Mobil could call the stuff the Million Mile Motor Oil.  Those diesels will go the distance.

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Small world. I was Mobil dealer back in the 80s-90s. Remember the oil recall?

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5 minutes ago, CKSNAP said:

Small world. I was Mobil dealer back in the 80s-90s. Remember the oil recall?

In the 80's I was the Maintenance Super for the FCC/Alky/and USGP in the Refinery. Got into the Lube Plants in the late 80's and was the Maintenance Manager at the new Paulsboro Lube Plant when it opened, then they put my show on the road working for corporate engineering at their terminals and lube plants in North America. Worked with MRDC as my partner in the race car worked on lubes formulation there, and retired to Maryland only to find that my new neighbor was the "father of Mobil 1". Small world indeed.  W

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I'm in MN with an at most 90 day boating season if you were to boat every day because it never rained and you had nothing else to do all summer.  Given the astonishing number of boats available for sale here and the fact that so many are rarely used but well maintained trailer queens, I would simply go to the next boat down on the page that had 1/3 of the hours.  Extremely low hours are the norm but the thing is that 1100 hours is going to show up in other wear areas of the boat.  Sure, logically, 1100 hours on 20 year old boat isn't massive but I will take the 300 hour boat that is perfectly kept as so many chap owners do and also pay the same price via negotiation.  Interesting thing is that you mention he told you the hours so I assume then there is no hour meter not that one can't be manipulated assuming the 5.7's ecm can't be read to verify.  End of the day, the paradigm of what comprises high hours is regional because that engine is venerable and will likely last for decades longer.  In MN, our paradigm is overpriced boats compared to many areas of the country and our normal is 'low' hours.  

My 02 has just a hair under 400 hours on it now which I consider high but that I live at my lake home much of the summer so I can boat whenever and since the lake is one of the larger ones, a slow cruise can put a lot of time on it in one use but that we tend to float around a lot as well.  

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My '92 has 593 hours on it.  In 26 years there are 227,760 hours.  My boat has been only used 0.26% of that time, or has sat idle for 227,167 hours.  That is alot of time for corrosion to set in and take over.  Low operating hours on a old boat isn't necessarily good.  One thing or another is going to kill it eventually, just like us.

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1998 Chap 2330 5.7 Mercruiser Bravo 3 outdrive; that has well maintained, could be good.

1998 Chap 2330 5.7 Mercruiser Bravo 3 outdrive; that is neglected; most likely is bad.

I dont think you will find anyone on this forum to tell you to buy it , without some more information(pics, maint. records, # of owners, marine survey, price).  sorry.

 

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I think there is a point in the life of a boat where of course it becomes condition and not engine hours that matter especially when you are dealing with outboards for example that will outlast the owner..It's as common as of a suggestion that 'air don't freeze'.  A 92 as mentioned above, absolutely is at that point, but at the same time a late 90's 2330 Chap is a pre-modern version of what the chaps became in the early 2000's when they had their next gen of build technology applied.  That is a fancy way to say that the 90's chaps had a lot of wood in areas that the next gen chaps didn't use wood plus of course flow through seat materials that are impervious to rot and other things as well. If I'm looking at an ancient 80's or 70's boat, I don't care what the hours are at that point. 

If I'm being honest, a 90's Chap is a non starter just for the build alone where as some of the earliest 'new' gen hulls had 2000 patent dates on them and had the next state of the art and those same models were made for the better part of nine more years.  Again, my whole boating life is colored by the fact we are so flush with boats in my state and whatever you want is available here.  That next gen of chaps that took a big leap forward as did the rest of the brands, albeit at different rates, and so the 90's chaps and the 2000's are apples and oranges.  My search filter would make so nothing pre 2002 showed up as also that is when smart craft capable MPI engines arrived on the scene which were the state of the art for more than another decade.    

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2 hours ago, Chaparral Rider said:

I'm in MN with an at most 90 day boating season if you were to boat every day because it never rained and you had nothing else to do all summer.  Given the astonishing number of boats available for sale here and the fact that so many are rarely used but well maintained trailer queens, I would simply go to the next boat down on the page that had 1/3 of the hours.  Extremely low hours are the norm but the thing is that 1100 hours is going to show up in other wear areas of the boat.  Sure, logically, 1100 hours on 20 year old boat isn't massive but I will take the 300 hour boat that is perfectly kept as so many chap owners do and also pay the same price via negotiation.  Interesting thing is that you mention he told you the hours so I assume then there is no hour meter not that one can't be manipulated assuming the 5.7's ecm can't be read to verify.  End of the day, the paradigm of what comprises high hours is regional because that engine is venerable and will likely last for decades longer.  In MN, our paradigm is overpriced boats compared to many areas of the country and our normal is 'low' hours.  

My 02 has just a hair under 400 hours on it now which I consider high but that I live at my lake home much of the summer so I can boat whenever and since the lake is one of the larger ones, a slow cruise can put a lot of time on it in one use but that we tend to float around a lot as well.  

Same in Michigan and New York a high hour boat would mean 5-700hours maybe a 1000 of that vintage.  Use is use regardless of how you use it and time frame.  But what would concern me on a 1000 hour boat beyond the engine would be everything else, as use matter in how many time something can be turned on or operated before it breaks.  Ive owned three boats one a 91 one a 93 and the newest being a 02 all northern boats, all with 300 hours or less.  Finding a less than 500 hour northern boat isn't hard to do.  Funny thing is the 02 with the lowest hours actually gave me the most problems.  So its hard to gauge use.  I think a boat over 1500 hours I simply wouldn't touch, and in general with being able to find boats with less than 500 hours in great shape around here I would also skip that boat, unless I was getting a discount. 

One thing to think about is small blocks are cheap to replace worst case scenario.  But end of the day I would necessarily shy away but a 20 year old boat with 1100 hours regardless of how good of shape I wouldn't be paying top dollar for it.

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35 minutes ago, soldier4402 said:

Same in Michigan and New York a high hour boat would mean 5-700hours maybe a 1000 of that vintage.  Use is use regardless of how you use it and time frame.  But what would concern me on a 1000 hour boat beyond the engine would be everything else, as use matter in how many time something can be turned on or operated before it breaks.  Ive owned three boats one a 91 one a 93 and the newest being a 02 all northern boats, all with 300 hours or less.  Finding a less than 500 hour northern boat isn't hard to do.  Funny thing is the 02 with the lowest hours actually gave me the most problems.  So its hard to gauge use.  I think a boat over 1500 hours I simply wouldn't touch, and in general with being able to find boats with less than 500 hours in great shape around here I would also skip that boat, unless I was getting a discount. 

One thing to think about is small blocks are cheap to replace worst case scenario.  But end of the day I would necessarily shy away but a 20 year old boat with 1100 hours regardless of how good of shape I wouldn't be paying top dollar for it.

The difference is here In MN and I bet in Michigan and NY is that I could have bought a five year newer of the exact same boat for what I paid in MN.  Cars are the same way as is the cost of service....crap, I forgot, The Economist just did a study and denoted Minneapolis the second highest cost of living in the country excluding housing but including rentals.  At least we have low hour boats I guess.  

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I was curious about this and googled it. It looks like 1100 hours is roughly 80000 to 110000 car miles. But a good point I saw in my googling of these websites in relation to  the hours, is even though you may think the engine itself has roughly 80000 ish miles or slightly more and maybe you were fine with that, the outdrive has that also. A lot of folks on that site said that their engines were running fine with that many miles, but they had a lot of other troubles, as in outdrive replacements. Also alternators, starters, waterpumps, power steering pumps, etc. If it were me I'd pass and look for a lower houred boat.

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12 minutes ago, jimmerheck said:

I was curious about this and googled it. It looks like 1100 hours is roughly 80000 to 110000 car miles. But a good point I saw in my googling of these websites in relation to  the hours, is even though you may think the engine itself has roughly 80000 ish miles or slightly more and maybe you were fine with that, the outdrive has that also. A lot of folks on that site said that their engines were running fine with that many miles, but they had a lot of other troubles, as in outdrive replacements. Also alternators, starters, waterpumps, power steering pumps, etc. If it were me I'd pass and look for a lower houred boat.

good point.  I personally wouldn't touch a boat much over 500 hours but like I said earlier its not like I'm against it, its just that I can find boat pretty easy with less than 500 hours pretty much any day of the week. 

 

But if you get a discount and a good price and are fine with possible maint in the future that's good too.  Small blocks are cheap if you go the reman route or find a used, unless you are the guy that's needs a brand a new factory engine. 

 

Drives wouldn't normally worry me either if they were an alpha or bravo one.   Cheap to find parts and cheap to replace if necessary.  B3 different ball game.  IMVHO B3 are overkill and not needed on something under 23-24ft that weighs under 5k lbs.  I can burn a drive up and probably find a used or rebuilt alpha or bravo 1 and be back in the water tomorrow for a 2 maybe 3 grand cant do that with B3s.  B3s to me are good drives not dogging them, but are oversell of equipment.  Bravo 1s will do all of what a three will do on some of these boats I see.

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2 hours ago, soldier4402 said:

Drives wouldn't normally worry me either if they were an alpha or bravo one.   Cheap to find parts and cheap to replace if necessary.  B3 different ball game.  IMVHO B3 are overkill and not needed on something under 23-24ft that weighs under 5k lbs.  I can burn a drive up and probably find a used or rebuilt alpha or bravo 1 and be back in the water tomorrow for a 2 maybe 3 grand cant do that with B3s.  B3s to me are good drives not dogging them, but are oversell of equipment.  Bravo 1s will do all of what a three will do on some of these boats I see.

You can get a complete SEI Alpha One Gen 2 for 1700 deer with a 3 year no fault warranty.  

I have agree with others that raise concern for the wood found in 90s boats.  Gutting a hull and replacing all the wood (Floor, stringers, transom) is going to cost as much if not more than the an Engine and drive.  

 

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Again, this is regional but for example, If right now something broke on my engine and I couldn't repair it myself, It is likely the end of my boating season as marinas are so backed up.  When I bought my current boat three seasons back in April, I needed a few things fixed and the local in the city marina was booked out through August which was to say they had no openings the entire summer.  Luckily I was able to find a place out of town that could fix it faster.  I think you get the overall message.  

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Hours aside for now. Unless you are just getting an outstanding deal on the boat and its in unbelievable condition, I would keep looking for something with a few less hours. Lots of boats out there for sale.

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1500 well maintained hours is a lot better than 500 hours treated like #$^%.

B3 I think are noticeably better in performance and handling than an A1 or B1.  The big advantage is that a 5.0 with a B3 may even out perform a 5.7 with an A1.  The BIG downside is when crap goes bad.

One other point....

As you consider power options, IMO an outboard is a WAY better option.  Easier to maintain, more reliable, etc..... Frankly, I don’t know why anyone would even want an IO unless the size of the boat dictates otherwise.  

Heck, I have a friend with a 37ft boat with two 300 HP outboards.  Outboards have a bad old rap for being two stroke, maint headaches, noisy, and only for small boats.  None of that is true.

when I get rid of my current boat, I will never own an IO again, unless I have no other option.

 

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7 minutes ago, WaterDR said:

1500 well maintained hours is a lot better than 500 hours treated like #$^%.

B3 I think are noticeably better in performance and handling than an A1 or B1.  The big advantage is that a 5.0 with a B3 may even out perform a 5.7 with an A1.  The BIG downside is when crap goes bad.

One other point....

As you consider power options, IMO an outboard is a WAY better option.  Easier to maintain, more reliable, etc..... Frankly, I don’t know why anyone would even want an IO unless the size of the boat dictates otherwise.  

Heck, I have a friend with a 37ft boat with two 300 HP outboards.  Outboards have a bad old rap for being two stroke, maint headaches, noisy, and only for small boats.  None of that is true.

when I get rid of my current boat, I will never own an IO again, unless I have no other option.

 

+1 on the new outboards. I think Chap is missing the boat (literally) as they don't offer twin outboards. My next ride will be a Cobia 277 CC if I can talk them into fitting it with the New 250 Merc 4 stroke.  W

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Pontoon’s have gotten so popular and I understand why.  I have had three of them myself.

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