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AU Kev

Fresh water boat in the Salt

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I have a 220 SSi that has always been in fresh water.  I am considering taking the boat to Cape San Blas, FL this summer and use in the Bay.  Any recommendations?  Do's and don't?  

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Just now, AU Kev said:

I have a 220 SSi that has always been in fresh water.  I am considering taking the boat to Cape San Blas, FL this summer and use in the Bay.  Any recommendations?  Do's and don't?  

Fresh water flush after each use as your engine block is raw water cooled. Also, growth on hull can happen faster than you would think in those waters so if she is not bottom painted, keep her on a trailer or keep her clean.  W

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i will take her out after each day.  Sounds like i just need to flush and wash down entire boat after each time out?  

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2 minutes ago, AU Kev said:

i will take her out after each day.  Sounds like i just need to flush and wash down entire boat after each time out?  

Good practice i any waters.  W

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1 minute ago, Wingnut said:

Good practice i any waters.  W

Thanks,  I do wash down after every time out.  Drives the kids crazy but they know its a part of going out now.  

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You might want to consider changing you anodes for the salt water too.

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I would also check with your insurance company. If I take mine into salt water without notifying them I can lose coverage.

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If you really value the engine and manifolds don't use in salt water without a proper freshwater cooling system.  The heads and exhaust have temps up to 800 degress or so.  Yes the coolant temp says 160 but there are much hotter areas and when sea water is in contact with hot iron and alloys there is degradation immediately.  You would not fill the radiator of your truck with sea water, right? Flushing really does not address this; it's too late.   

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I have been running saltwater for 30 years. You do not need freshwater cooling to run in saltwater.

Flush your engines.

I have freshwater cooling and flush before I take the boat out of the water, I am in hi and dry.

I also take CRC and lightly spray the engines down before I put the boat away.

Do check with your insurance company as your area of operation may change and require a waiver.

Enjoy Florida!

 

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1 hour ago, jeffk said:

I have been running saltwater for 30 years. You do not need freshwater cooling to run in saltwater.

Flush your engines.

Salt water freak - out is back in full force.

I flush the engine in the slip after each outing, then at the end of the season, give it a long flush before filling it with antifreeze.

It's more than likely that eventually after so much usage, one is going to have to replace risers and a few things like that, but that's no reason to geographically relocate!  Ma goodness. :-)

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6 hours ago, Chap243 said:

You might want to consider changing you anodes for the salt water too.

Yes, flush is not that important as the anodes. 

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Wuuuut?!  How are the anodes on the outdrive going to help the salt water that ends up inside the engine block's raw water cooling system?  And exhaust system? 

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+1 on the anodes unless you want your outdrive to start to corrode

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My first boat, a 1987 2152 Bayliner I owned from 1991-2008. I occasionally took into salt water off of Savannah, Ga. I did nothing extra to it except flush the engine and rinse it off without having any rust problems. I gave the boat to an acquaintance in 2008 when I got my new 215 SSi and have heard of no problems with it.

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20 hours ago, AU Kev said:

I have a 220 SSi that has always been in fresh water.  I am considering taking the boat to Cape San Blas, FL this summer and use in the Bay.  Any recommendations?  Do's and don't?  

I misread your post for some strange reason, thought you were moving to FLA not just thinking of taking your boat there for a bit of the summer.

I'll tell you my opinion and take it for whatever it's worth:  When I first joined this board, most of the members were lake-boaters and there was this innate fear of salt water.  Then a couple of the salt water guys doused the fire a little bit.  I boat salt water all the time, even slip it in SW for the entire season since that's really all we have here in MA.  I make sure I have zinc anodes and flush the engine religiously, no matter how tired or in a hurry I might be, I make it a point not to miss a single flush to keep as much salt out of the engine as possible.  And I don't have a closed cooling system.

Some of the most enjoyable times we've had with the boat -- aside from where we slip in and the local harbors etc. -- was taking it a couple of times down to Cape Cod and once to Maryland to meet up with another forum member and do some Chesapeake bay fishing and boating etc.  Those experiences were fantastic and quite memorable.

I've been to Florida many times and can only wish I could trailer the Chap there, although I do have a great friend who's recently offered me to get on his immaculate Signature 310 whenever I'm down there and I might take him up on that, I still would love to take the Chap and actually meet up with him and boat the Keys.

Long story short, it's a boat.  Use it to its full capacity and enjoy the living daylights out of it and if that means taking it out of FW and putting in SW in Florida, so be it.  It's not going to burn and sink.  Put the zinc anodes on the drive and flush it well after each outing and you'll be fine.  You'll have a great memory to add to your list. 

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salt is not going to ruin anything overnight especially with proper care, even with long term exposure with proper care it will be alright.  The insurance part is a good point as I know mine is only set for like great lakes and tributaries.

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When I go to the Bahamas, its a 50 dollar waiver.

Curious if you have a VP or a merc.

The VP has flush hoses right on the front of the engine, it makes things very simple.

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