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SG Boater

Aluminum Locknut in Bilge, what does it belong to?

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It's my full size table saw I build cabinets and cabinet doors with, machined cast iron surface.  So it's a good measure of flatness, at least on a 2' piece of pipe. I also rotated the pipe varying degrees and then went through all the above with the pipe at various degrees of rotation because as you say, only a slight bend in the pipe could produce the results I'm getting.  But no matter what I do, I get the same results.  I wish there was something yet to check without yanking the motor, but no go that I can think of.  While I was waiting for the "Busy Season" to go by I changed out plugs, shift cable, u-joint and shift cable bellows and replaced exhaust bellow with a tube.  Last spring when they yanked it I had them change out the exhaust flappers.  With a new coupler, I think all the usual wear items will be good for a long time.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, SG Boater said:

Simply being out of alignment will prevent the 1" pipe from centering w/in the gimbal, but it would stay in the same position as you rotated the engine.  The fact that the alignment changes as the crank is rotated indicates something isn't true, whether it be the coupler, flywheel, crank or ??  And the pipe-to-gimbal clearance changes approximately 1/8" throughout one rotation of the motor.  The coupler is likely the only thing that could be untrue to that degree and not grenade the engine over the 60 hours I put on it this summer.  

The rear mounting bolt was backed out/sticking up a good 1/2" mid summer, when I originally found the nut in the bilge.  This fall when I winterized, both rear mounts were visually where they should be, but the port one took a 1/2 turn or so to obtain the required torque, not a 1/2".  The front mounting nuts are finger tight.  I first tightened the rear portside mount and then used the pipe to see if the coupler was running true.  As described above, it isn't so no use to even mess with the front mounts.  No amount of adjustment is going to make the coupler run true.  Now if the engine was running I could see loose mounts causing the engine to bounce around and the coupler appear to be running untrue.  But I'm turning the engine over by hand, very slowly by hand.  I've also marked the crank pulley with a piece of tape and turned the engine over multiple times, and got out and checked position of the pipe to gimbal.  Always the same when I stop in the same location, ie. every time I stop with the tape at 12:00, pipe is in the same position.  Every time I stop with the tape at 6:00, it's in the same position.  But the 6:00 position is not the same as the 12:00 position.   

+1

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18 hours ago, SG Boater said:

By the way, I appreciate the comments and suggestions. 

Good friend of mine -- who was following this thread from its onset -- sent me these pictures of his transom mounts, actually a while ago when all the idiocy that temporarily and unfortunately disrupted the good flow of this thread was going on.  It's an early 90's Chaparral with a 4.3 Merc and Alpha drive with the same difficult access to them.  Figured I would post them for you as an additional reference.  Good look at the captured nut, bushings between the two mount rings and of course, the bolt head, washer and spacer flush tight as they should be.

hkDuxhm.jpg

hZgWsOu.jpg

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Well, the plan is for it all to come out, replace anything that looks even remotely worn, broken down, or???  This shop has good reviews so I am going to assume they are competent.  If your friend's early 90's is anything like my '98 1830 was, that's a dream compared to the access on the '05 210 SSI I have now.  I believe the 190 of the mid 2000's era is the same where there is a bulkhead midpoint on the engine.  Only way to access the rear of the engine is through an approximate 1' x 1' cutout near the bottom on each side.  With the bench seat out I can get my head and one arm through, no way both arms.  The other arm has to go between the bulkhead and engine.  From the top, all I can get to is what I can reach with my head about where the flame arrestor is.  That's why the coupling has to be greased by pulling the outdrive, can't get to the grease fitting. I'll be back in a couple of weeks with good results hopefully.

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25 minutes ago, SG Boater said:

Well, the plan is for it all to come out, replace anything that looks even remotely worn, broken down, or???  This shop has good reviews so I am going to assume they are competent.  If your friend's early 90's is anything like my '98 1830 was, that's a dream compared to the access on the '05 210 SSI I have now.  I believe the 190 of the mid 2000's era is the same where there is a bulkhead midpoint on the engine.  Only way to access the rear of the engine is through an approximate 1' x 1' cutout near the bottom on each side.  With the bench seat out I can get my head and one arm through, no way both arms.  The other arm has to go between the bulkhead and engine.  From the top, all I can get to is what I can reach with my head about where the flame arrestor is.  That's why the coupling has to be greased by pulling the outdrive, can't get to the grease fitting. I'll be back in a couple of weeks with good results hopefully.

Those are actually pics of my boat, I was just too lazy to setup imgur so I could post them.  Thanks Hatem:).  I have the standard seating with the two jump seats next to the dog house.  It was awfully nice of the the builder to give me a seat to sit on while working on the engine.  Pull those seats out, remove the dog house and the rear bulkhead and the engine is exposed and easy to get to on all sides.  I feel bad for all of you who can barely see the engine, much less get a firm grip on the component that you are trying to replace. 

The original purpose of the pics was to illustrate how the rear mounts are assembled and show that there 'might' be enough room to sneak the locknut back into its slot "if" you could get a hand or some other magnet tool anywhere near that area.  

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Somehow they got a nut in there on mine cause I was able to torque it back down.  It will be interesting to see what the new shop finds when they pull the engine.  There are probably more skeletons hiding back there from the guys this spring.  Best I can tell, nothing isn't damaged that isn't a bolt on, ie. coupler, maybe mounts, so besides having to pull the engine, not too big a deal.  Could have been much worse.

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On ‎12‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 1:54 PM, SG Boater said:

It's my full size table saw I build cabinets and cabinet doors with, machined cast iron surface.

Are you a cabinet maker, or just do that on the side for fun/hobby?  I have a couple of Deltas in my shop, currently one of them is used as a shelf loaded with junk! lol.  Really nice pieces of well-built equipment.  Currently shopping for a new jointer and thickness planer. 

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Just a hobby, but I did make all the cabinets and trim in our house when we built a while back.  Now it's just a table now and then when we need something.  If you only need a 6", Jet makes a good jointer.  I don't have a thickness planer, I use my dad's when I need it.  He's got a lot of Grizzly equipment, including his 16" planer, and I'm impressed with it.  Much more reasonable than some of the premium lines, and unless you're a professional (and maybe even if you are) I think Grizzly equipment does a satisfactory job. It's a good bang for the buck.  

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On 12/7/2018 at 6:10 PM, SG Boater said:

Somehow they got a nut in there on mine cause I was able to torque it back down.  It will be interesting to see what the new shop finds when they pull the engine.  There are probably more skeletons hiding back there from the guys this spring.  Best I can tell, nothing isn't damaged that isn't a bolt on, ie. coupler, maybe mounts, so besides having to pull the engine, not too big a deal.  Could have been much worse.

SG, where are you taking it?

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Taking it to OPC in Barnhart.  Friend of mine had his up there and he thought prices a little high but was impressed with their knowledge and work.  At this point I just want someone good that can put it back right so was willing to pony up a little extra for someone that i could get a firsthand reference on.  And they are as close as anyone.  

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They are good mechanics but they are pricey as your friend said. The brothers that run the place kind of inherited the business from their father. He started it as a mobile unit with a trailer in tow and actually came to your house to winterize and do other work. I know they are certified and go to Florida every winter for seminars.

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Known good mechanics are what I am looking for so I'll suck it up.  Piece of mind is worth something.  The good feeling from saving $ this spring didn't last long.

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