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15 hours ago, Iggy said:

The bottom paint was no way a insulator. It was his bonding system then that was putting current into the water. 

Why are you saying it wasn't an insulator?  Apparently it did exactly that.  If it stopped once the guy had his bottom painted, it insulated whatever electrical current that was being emitted by the sailboat and kept it from getting into the water and being conducted by the OP (or his friend) touching his own props while standing in the water.

Unless it happens to be an amazing coincidence that the stray current disappeared the same day the sailboat was bottom painted and put into the water, I'd say it acted just like an insulator.  Doesn't mean the problem is fixed on the sailboat, it just got bandaided.  But at least now he knows it's not his boat or his lift or his electrical wiring. 

15 hours ago, Iggy said:

His bonding system was putting current into the water. When you touched your prop, it is grounded so you felt it. Know i would check your anodes. I would think there eaten up by this.

I took a walk around the marina on Saturday and I couldn't believe how many shorepower chords were actually dipped in the water.  I know that technically it shouldn't be a problem since those chords are heavily insulated just for that reason, but it was a bit worrisome since that's not really what you want to do with those chords.  If they accidently fall into the water, it's a failsafe to have that heavy insulation.  But it's not the way they should be run.

Maybe that's why after the last season, my anodes looked like this.  They'll probably be the same this year when I get to them in about a week.

xLx496g.jpg

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5 hours ago, Hatem said:

Why are you saying it wasn't an insulator?  Apparently it did exactly that.  If it stopped once the guy had his bottom painted, it insulated whatever electrical current that was being emitted by the sailboat and kept it from getting into the water and being conducted by the OP (or his friend) touching his own props while standing in the water.

Unless it happens to be an amazing coincidence that the stray current disappeared the same day the sailboat was bottom painted and put into the water, I'd say it acted just like an insulator.  Doesn't mean the problem is fixed on the sailboat, it just got bandaided.  But at least now he knows it's not his boat or his lift or his electrical wiring. 

I took a walk around the marina on Saturday and I couldn't believe how many shorepower chords were actually dipped in the water.  I know that technically it shouldn't be a problem since those chords are heavily insulated just for that reason, but it was a bit worrisome since that's not really what you want to do with those chords.  If they accidently fall into the water, it's a failsafe to have that heavy insulation.  But it's not the way they should be run.

Maybe that's why after the last season, my anodes looked like this.  They'll probably be the same this year when I get to them in about a week.

 

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I re-read his post and maybe you should too. See below and he is saying that the boat was removed and sold but not put back. We all make mistakes....  But also remember what most bottom paint is made up of.

 

 

  • Update to all who offered information and help.

 

Recently, my neighbor took his sailboat to the yard for a bottom job. Guess what, no more current on my prop!

His boat was the source, not mine. Fortunately, he has now sold his boat and it will be removed next week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry. 

 

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9 minutes ago, Iggy said:

I re-read his post and maybe you should too. See below and he is saying that the boat was removed and sold but not put back. We all make mistakes....  

Recently, my neighbor took his sailboat to the yard for a bottom job. Guess what, no more current on my prop!

His boat was the source, not mine. Fortunately, he has now sold his boat and it will be removed next week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry. 

 

Actually the blow boat was returned to the slip but his boat is out of the water. I would have been curious to see if the new paint would have made a difference. 

 

Stray currents is one reason I never swim in the marina. 

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17 hours ago, Iggy said:

I re-read his post and maybe you should too. See below and he is saying that the boat was removed and sold but not put back.

Let's reread it again, then.

On ‎9‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 10:14 AM, docdixon said:

Recently, my neighbor took his sailboat to the yard for a bottom job. Guess what, no more current on my prop!

His boat was the source, not mine. Fortunately, he has now sold his boat and it will be removed next week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry. 

That doesn't sound like the boat has been staying at the yard since it got bottom painted.  It sounds like it was brought back and the stray current solved by the bottom paint and whomever bought is it removing it next week.

At any rate, the OP doesn't really need to be too concerned with his anodes even.  I bet they're perfectly fine unless he leaves his boat in the water at his dock but that doesn't sound like it's the case.  He has it on the lift all the time so there isn't any current going through the props and the only time that happens is if he or his friend touches them, which is once or twice?  His boat is fine.

Question is, if indeed the bottom paint insulated the stray current (which it sounds much like that's the case), it must've covered a certain metallic part on the sailboat that was conducting the current and not just the fiberglass hull.  Perhaps the prop shaft and prop or the rudder(s) was covered in the paint.  Or there's a thru-hull or two that were leaking AC or even DC current and they were painted over.

 

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49 minutes ago, Hatem said:

Let's reread it again, then.

That doesn't sound like the boat has been staying at the yard since it got bottom painted.  It sounds like it was brought back and the stray current solved by the bottom paint and whomever bought is it removing it next week.

At any rate, the OP doesn't really need to be too concerned with his anodes even.  I bet they're perfectly fine unless he leaves his boat in the water at his dock but that doesn't sound like it's the case.  He has it on the lift all the time so there isn't any current going through the props and the only time that happens is if he or his friend touches them, which is once or twice?  His boat is fine.

Question is, if indeed the bottom paint insulated the stray current (which it sounds much like that's the case), it must've covered a certain metallic part on the sailboat that was conducting the current and not just the fiberglass hull.  Perhaps the prop shaft and prop or the rudder(s) was covered in the paint.  Or there's a thru-hull or two that were leaking AC or even DC current and they were painted over.

 

Well it is not very clear if the boat is in the water or not. At lest to me...

I will put my neck out to say that 80 to 90% of bottom paint is copper. If the bottom is done right, it will not insulate any current. If done wrong, it will conduct if the current is there.

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Neighbor's sailboat was out of nearby slip for couple of weeks. During that time there was no current at my prop when I lowered boat into water. When he brought his boat home from the yard, there was no more current at my boat. He did have boat bottom painted and some 'other work.' regardless, the source was. his boat. Hopefully, the new owner will be removing this sailboat this week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry on it's covered lift. Sorry for any confusion.

Joe

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3 hours ago, docdixon said:

Neighbor's sailboat was out of nearby slip for couple of weeks. During that time there was no current at my prop when I lowered boat into water. When he brought his boat home from the yard, there was no more current at my boat. He did have boat bottom painted and some 'other work.' regardless, the source was. his boat. Hopefully, the new owner will be removing this sailboat this week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry on it's covered lift. Sorry for any confusion.

Joe

Don't be. Bottom paint or not, that boat has a A.C. problem. Your drive was the shortest path to ground and you felt it. Good luck!! 

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6 hours ago, Iggy said:

Well it is not very clear if the boat is in the water or not. At lest to me...

I will put my neck out to say that 80 to 90% of bottom paint is copper. If the bottom is done right, it will not insulate any current. If done wrong, it will conduct if the current is there.

Exactly. Copper Oxide is very conductive and that's why it is imperative to have a small parting line around the transom housing so the copper never touches the aluminum. The Tri-Lux out drive paints are TBD tin based as that is a lessor metal.  W

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10 hours ago, Iggy said:

Well it is not very clear if the boat is in the water or not. At lest to me...

Well it's clear now, yes?  So obviously the fix was either related to the bottom paint or some of the "other work" that Joe eluded to that the guy had done on the sailboat at the same time, which we don't know, but he should really find out for his own sake and future safety purposes.

10 hours ago, Iggy said:

I will put my neck out to say that 80 to 90% of bottom paint is copper. If the bottom is done right, it will not insulate any current. If done wrong, it will conduct if the current is there.

HOLD YOUR HORSES, and your neck!  You're automatically assuming that the bottom paint that was used is the copper oxide antifouling paint that we all put on our boats, but you know that most sailboats have vivid-colored bottom paints which is different than the black, anti-fouling paint that we have.  Look around our area and in your marina at all the sailboats with blue, red, green bottom paint.  Those are different and contain white copper (cuprous thiocyanate), zinc or ECONEA as the biocide that fights marine growth instead of "cuprous oxide" and that is not the same stuff.  That's much closer to the same anti-fouling paints we do use on our aluminum outdrives that do not contain that conductive copper.  That might very well be the case here because what else can explain this phenomenon other than that? 

8 hours ago, docdixon said:

Neighbor's sailboat was out of nearby slip for couple of weeks. During that time there was no current at my prop when I lowered boat into water. When he brought his boat home from the yard, there was no more current at my boat. He did have boat bottom painted and some 'other work.' regardless, the source was. his boat. Hopefully, the new owner will be removing this sailboat this week. Meanwhile, my boat is high and dry on it's covered lift. Sorry for any confusion.

Joe

Not to beat a dead horse, but is the original owner of the sailboat in question still around?  If so, it might be beneficial to you to not only tell him that his boat was causing a stray current that was affecting your boat (and actually gave you a good zap), but to find out exactly what was the other work that was done to the boat.  Knowing that information will only help you in the future just incase there's a similar issue with the new neighbor.  Just a suggestion. 

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Reading back in this thread you’ll discover that this neighbor is the fellow who felt the tingle on my prop. Not me. There is no tingle now when my prop in in the water. He did have some  electrical work done but not sure what. He is selling this boat soon.  Hopefully his next sailboat won’t cause a tingle. :-) if so the problem is likely in his dock wiring and lift. 

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18 hours ago, Hatem said:

Well it's clear now, yes?  So obviously the fix was either related to the bottom paint or some of the "other work" that Joe eluded to that the guy had done on the sailboat at the same time, which we don't know, but he should really find out for his own sake and future safety purposes.

HOLD YOUR HORSES, and your neck!  You're automatically assuming that the bottom paint that was used is the copper oxide antifouling paint that we all put on our boats, but you know that most sailboats have vivid-colored bottom paints which is different than the black, anti-fouling paint that we have.  Look around our area and in your marina at all the sailboats with blue, red, green bottom paint.  Those are different and contain white copper (cuprous thiocyanate), zinc or ECONEA as the biocide that fights marine growth instead of "cuprous oxide" and that is not the same stuff.  That's much closer to the same anti-fouling paints we do use on our aluminum outdrives that do not contain that conductive copper.  That might very well be the case here because what else can explain this phenomenon other than that? 

Not to beat a dead horse, but is the original owner of the sailboat in question still around?  If so, it might be beneficial to you to not only tell him that his boat was causing a stray current that was affecting your boat (and actually gave you a good zap), but to find out exactly what was the other work that was done to the boat.  Knowing that information will only help you in the future just incase there's a similar issue with the new neighbor.  Just a suggestion. 

How in the world can you assume that most sail boaters use a vivid paint from Pettit. Did you take a poll? With all the brands and types out there. Really?  Now I did my homework, as Wingnut stated "TBD tin based as that is a lessor metal." So that got me thinking......... I call Pittit, and Vivid paint does have copper in it. But they said "the copper is formulated differently" and "is conductive". 

ALSO, if you read my post I said "I will put my neck out to say that 80 to 90% of bottom paint is copper. "Meaning on the basis that you said "Question is, if indeed the bottom paint insulated the stray current (which it sounds much like that's the case)" I never said that he had copper based paint. My point was, that bottom paint will not act as a insulator. If anything, it will act as a conductor which Wingnut agreed and again Petiit conformed that Vivid will too. 

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19 hours ago, Iggy said:

How in the world can you assume that most sail boaters use a vivid paint from Pettit. Did you take a poll? With all the brands and types out there. Really?  Now I did my homework, as Wingnut stated "TBD tin based as that is a lessor metal." So that got me thinking......... I call Pittit, and Vivid paint does have copper in it. But they said "the copper is formulated differently" and "is conductive". 

ALSO, if you read my post I said "I will put my neck out to say that 80 to 90% of bottom paint is copper. "Meaning on the basis that you said "Question is, if indeed the bottom paint insulated the stray current (which it sounds much like that's the case)" I never said that he had copper based paint. My point was, that bottom paint will not act as a insulator. If anything, it will act as a conductor which Wingnut agreed and again Petiit conformed that Vivid will too. 

lol, I'm talking about vivid colors, as in bright colors.  And what's the silliness about taking a poll?  I told you look around your yacht club at all the colors that are used for bottom paint on sailboats, they're different than the crap we use.  Almost every single sailboat at my marina is a super bright blue paint like the pic below. 

Oh, and also; there's no big revealing secret about what the other member said regarding copper and it's conductivity in the bottom paints that we use.  It's not some monumental breakthrough information LOL.    

I'll try one final time with a link since you -- nor anyone else for that matter -- has been able to either debunk the point that the bottom paint was either the cure to the stray current or not.  All you've done is spout about copper in paint and it's conductivity rah rah rah which we all already know!  I'm showing you that most bottom paint used on sailboats are different and it could very well have been the cause of insulating the stray current.   

Here, from West Marine:

Do you want bright colors?

If you want your bottom paint to really pop, use one that contains white copper (cuprous thiocyanate), zinc or ECONEA as the biocide. White copper is clean white in color and used in brightly colored paints such as Pettit’s Vivid and Interlux Trilux 33. White copper formulations require 50% less copper than heavier conventional antifouling paint formulated with dark cuprous oxide. White copper produces the brightest colors, whitest whites and blackest blacks. Paints that contain ECONEA as the biocide are another choice. ECONEA® is a metal-free biocide that, depending on the paint formulation, can be as effective as cuprous oxide at about one tenth the concentration in paint by weight. This results in a brighter range of colors compared to darker cuprous oxide based paints. ECONEA also does not cause discoloration in the presence of sulfides, as do metal-based paints.

Of course the guy at Vivid is gonna say "Uh yeah, there is copper in the paint."  Did he mention that is was 50% less copper?  Besides, it might not even be Vivid.

This is 95% of the bottom paint colors up here in the Boston area, a bright blue.

Antifouling-Paint-3.jpg

This ECONEA-based paint has virtually no smell.

Are you in an area that restricts copper biocides?

Your best bet here is to use a bottom paint that contains zinc or ECONEA as the biocide. Worthy of mention, is the specialty paint PropSpeed which contains no biocide at all. Instead, it is a super-slick coating that easily sheds marine growth. Propspeed is used on underwater metals, including props, struts, shafts and keel coolers.

https://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/Top-Ten-Antifouling-Paint-Buying-Questions

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6 hours ago, Hatem said:

lol, I'm talking about vivid colors, as in bright colors.  And what's the silliness about taking a poll?  I told you look around your yacht club at all the colors that are used for bottom paint on sailboats, they're different than the crap we use.  Almost every single sailboat at my marina is a super bright blue paint like the pic below. 

Oh, and also; there's no big revealing secret about what the other member said regarding copper and it's conductivity in the bottom paints that we use.  It's not some monumental breakthrough information LOL.    

I'll try one final time with a link since you -- nor anyone else for that matter -- has been able to either debunk the point that the bottom paint was either the cure to the stray current or not.  All you've done is spout about copper in paint and it's conductivity rah rah rah which we all already know!  I'm showing you that most bottom paint used on sailboats are different and it could very well have been the cause of insulating the stray current.   

Here, from West Marine:

Do you want bright colors?

If you want your bottom paint to really pop, use one that contains white copper (cuprous thiocyanate), zinc or ECONEA as the biocide. White copper is clean white in color and used in brightly colored paints such as Pettit’s Vivid and Interlux Trilux 33. White copper formulations require 50% less copper than heavier conventional antifouling paint formulated with dark cuprous oxide. White copper produces the brightest colors, whitest whites and blackest blacks. Paints that contain ECONEA as the biocide are another choice. ECONEA® is a metal-free biocide that, depending on the paint formulation, can be as effective as cuprous oxide at about one tenth the concentration in paint by weight. This results in a brighter range of colors compared to darker cuprous oxide based paints. ECONEA also does not cause discoloration in the presence of sulfides, as do metal-based paints.

Of course the guy at Vivid is gonna say "Uh yeah, there is copper in the paint."  Did he mention that is was 50% less copper?  Besides, it might not even be Vivid.

This is 95% of the bottom paint colors up here in the Boston area, a bright blue.

Antifouling-Paint-3.jpg

This ECONEA-based paint has virtually no smell.

Are you in an area that restricts copper biocides?

Your best bet here is to use a bottom paint that contains zinc or ECONEA as the biocide. Worthy of mention, is the specialty paint PropSpeed which contains no biocide at all. Instead, it is a super-slick coating that easily sheds marine growth. Propspeed is used on underwater metals, including props, struts, shafts and keel coolers.

https://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/Top-Ten-Antifouling-Paint-Buying-Questions

This is getting stupid...........

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6 hours ago, Phillbo said:

What is a Keel Cooler?

What comes to mind is.... Rather than having a standard heat exchanger.  Meaning raw water going though the heat exchanger cooling off the AF. The heat exchanger is bolted to the underside of the boat and sea water passes over it, rather than though it to cool of the AF. 

This is mainly used in diesel engines and big boats. Not boats of our size, in the 22 to 34 footer. 

A little off topic, no??

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21 hours ago, docdixon said:

Ditto to what Hatem said. My previous boat was an IP27 and we used Interlux as did many in the marina. Peace

It seems everyone knows this except for one individual.  So what made you jump from being a blow-boater to a smoke stacker? lol 

15 hours ago, Iggy said:

This is getting stupid...........

I didn't expect anything of substance so I'm not surprised by this.  At least you didn't repeat "copper is in bottom paint" again!

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We moved from coastal NC to coastal Ala. In NC we had inland deep water and plenty of affordable marinas with wet slips for sailboats. In Ala we have shallower inland waters and few affordable wet slip marinas. We live on a canal with easy access to Perdido Bay and the Gulf. Lots of resturants here to get to by power boat quickly. Different lifestyle here. You ever own a sailboat? We love both. 

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