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stangman

1981 restoration

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Seller says he was going to put twin 1990 Mercury 2 strokes (about 300 hours each) on it, wiling to part with them also. No price for those yet...

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18 hours ago, stangman said:

Seller says he was going to put twin 1990 Mercury 2 strokes (about 300 hours each) on it, wiling to part with them also. No price for those yet...

So are you going to do it or what?  I hope they're 115HP because you're going to need enough power to push a 24' boat with a cabin around.  You don't want it underpowered because by the time you add all the stuff you need in the boat (batteries, gas, people, shhhtuff) you need enough power.  Those are low hours for motors built in 1990.  Are you able to verify those hours?

If they run good and are at least 115HP, I would find a way to package them in the deal.  But putting a pair of outboards is a bit more complicated than a single I'm sure you know that.  You need one with its prop rotating one way and the other counter rotating to that, and the right one going on the right side.  Then you need a steering arm for both to steer together etc.

 

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Morning, went to see the boat and motors yesterday. Motors are 200 hp but I think he's asking too much for the pair $5,500 and he said the I/o was 200 hp About the boat, transom area needs much more shoring up and fiberglass work and wiring is a mess, remaining work appears to be cosmetic. Boat is in a storage facility stall but appears to have been sitting for a while (dirty spider webs etc.) Here's the big issue, all I have right now to pull this is a 96 Ford bronco and this boat must be at least 5,000+ pounds. Will it pull the boat yes, safely probably not. Even with all this I would like to have and work on this beast. I figure a good year to get it where I want it and by that time have an old body style ford f250 or 350.

He offered the whole package for $6,000. I figure maybe just get the boat and worry about a motor after all needed repairs and clean up. Can't believe I'm considering this but the idea of working on it really excites me.   I'm no kid, will be 64 next month. I remember my Dad would get excited about projects like this, enjoyed the work more than the use after all was done.  

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I pulled my 1987 Chap with a Bronco. Piece of cake. Although, if you don't have anti-lock brakes, then I wouldn't do it.  As I've mentioned many times over the years, I had a situation that I had to "panic brake" to avoid plowing into teenagers. The Bronco kept control of the boat and came to a stop in a straight line.  

My combined trailer weight is 6000lbs.

If you're going to do just local towing the other vehicles are over kill. The Bronco will be fine.

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Any more thoughts? Seller is now listing for $2,000, down $500 from earlier this week. I'm thinking of offering $750 with a top end of $1,000.

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might look around online and see if you can find the weight.  older boats are heavy but 5 grand might be hight.  I would guessing 3500-low 4s. 

as far as ,motors outboards need less HP to achieve the same results as an I/O.  Boat like that depending on what you want to do 150-200hp outboard would probably get you into the 40 mph range. 

 

I think your right  1g maybe 1500 tops is about all id be willing to part with for that.

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10 minutes ago, Curt said:

Suggest starting @ $500. 

Could start there and might, just didn't want the seller to hang up on me.

 

9 minutes ago, soldier4402 said:

might look around online and see if you can find the weight.  older boats are heavy but 5 grand might be hight.  I would guessing 3500-low 4s. 

as far as ,motors outboards need less HP to achieve the same results as an I/O.  Boat like that depending on what you want to do 150-200hp outboard would probably get you into the 40 mph range. 

 

I think your right  1g maybe 1500 tops is about all id be willing to part with for that.

Nice to know about the outboard power, any special make you like? Four stroke or two stroke? Not a speed demon, some fishing and putting around. 

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34 minutes ago, stangman said:

Could start there and might, just didn't want the seller to hang up on me.

He/she doesn't have another option, other than paying to dispose of it.  Plus, he/she is paying a monthly storage cost.  Go meet the seller face to face, with a stack of $100's in hand.  A stack of $100's and immediate payment are hard to say no to.

As to the motor(s), I'd go 4-stroke.  Mercury, Honda, Yamaha.  I'd go demo or new, or verifiable lightly used.  Personally, I'd leave the motors with him.  He's overpriced, and they are too old for me to trust on the ocean.  $5,500 gets a much newer outboard, at least where I live.  If you really plan on ocean, though, twins but I don't think the transom is currently set-up for that.

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19 minutes ago, Curt said:

He/she doesn't have another option, other than paying to dispose of it.  Plus, he/she is paying a monthly storage cost.  Go meet the seller face to face, with a stack of $100's in hand.  A stack of $100's and immediate payment is hard to say no to.

As to the motor(s), I'd go 4-stroke.  Mercury, Honda, Yamaha.  I'd go demo or new, or verifiable lightly used.  Personally, I'd leave his motors with him.  He is overpriced, and they are too old for me to trust on the ocean.  $5,500 gets a much newer outboard, at least where I live.  If you really plan on ocean, though, twins but I don't think the transom is currently set-up for that.

Not planning to go too far out, probably would scare my wife if she couldn't see land.

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On ‎8‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 7:53 AM, summerpenguin said:

In the 90s, my father-in-law's Chesapeake scow got caught under the dock at low tide and sank when the tide came in. Because the OB still ran, another son-in-law and I took it upon ourselves to restore it to working condition since I do woodwork and he restored cars. We saw the transom had lost its strength (it was rotten in parts and it wiggled), so I took an 8 foot, 12 inch wide, 3 inch thick mahogany board and cut it in half. Then I drilled holes in both pieces and put rebar in the holes and glued them together to get the height of the old transom. Then I cut the notch in the top part for the OB (angled the sides and bottom) and we glued and screwed it all into the bottom and the sides of the boat. Then the other guy put coats of fiberglass on it. The hardest part was taking out the old transom because screws and nails were holding it in at all angles. It was a fun project! That boat lasted another 3 years. My FIL sold it and bought a 22' Grady White which, after a few years, became my first boat when I bought it from him. 

That's pretty neat that you used rebar between that new piece of mahogany and the bottom section of the original transom.  That's the perfect example of improvising a great solution as you're working on something like that.  Some people would've just put a pair of wooden dowels and glued them in to connect the two pieces, but rebar is 100x better.  And a solid piece of mahogany is better than 3 layers of marine plywood laminated together to get that thickness.  And you actually had a horizontal seam in that transom and it was fine, how about that?  Because you know there was quite a bit of strain on that joint from the weight and force and tilting of the outboard but with the rebar, glue and fiberglass it was solid as a rock.  Awesome.

23 hours ago, Dennis A said:

Is the transom notch wide enough for (2) 115s?

And need clearance for them when they're turning.  Turns out that boat came with either a 200HP or 260HP sterndrive, so he doesn't really need 400HP. 

23 hours ago, stangman said:

Motors are 200 hp but I think he's asking too much for the pair $5,500 and he said the I/o was 200 hp About the boat, transom area needs much more shoring up and fiberglass work and wiring is a mess, remaining work appears to be cosmetic. Boat is in a storage facility stall but appears to have been sitting for a while (dirty spider webs etc.)

I guess Chaparral made 2 models of the 244 Cuddy Delux, one with a 200HP I/O and another one with a 260HP.  So current owner was truthful about the original sterndrive motor being 200HP.  In that case you really don't need a pair of those 200HP outboards and make that stern that much heavier.  You can take a look at the NADA listing for that model year here: http://www.nadaguides.com/Boats/1981/CHAPARRAL-BOATS .  Knowing the value of the boat should help you with your negotiating.

23 hours ago, stangman said:

Can't believe I'm considering this but the idea of working on it really excites me.   I'm no kid, will be 64 next month. I remember my Dad would get excited about projects like this, enjoyed the work more than the use after all was done.  

Definitely.  You're still a young man, plenty left in the tank.  Have you seen these Frisco series on YT?  They're pretty popular in the boating forum circuit because this guy bought a Sea Ray 220 and after buying it he finds a soft spot on the deck floor and then decides to open it up only to find out the thing was pretty rotted in a major way.  Deck, transom, stringer and all the foam between the deck and stringers was almost completely water-logged.  He ends up taking the entire thing apart and basically rebuilding the whole boat minus the hull and whatever fiberglass cap is on that thing.  Puts a brand new Merc motor and sterndrive and just does an outstanding job with that.  He shows how he cuts the new stringers and glues them in place and all the buttering and glassing and chopstrand he used and explains it really well.  He even explains all the mixing for the thick cake he puts in the corners and how he mixes the glassing etc.  I highly recommend watching the entire series.  It's pretty long because it's a MAJOR project and he also goes into some personal stuff like his mother died during the process and other things like that but you can skip through all of that and get to all the nitty gritty and you'll see how easy it is to do your boat compared to this one and you'll learn a lot.  And yours is MUCH easier than what this fella had to do.  He's also in Texas if I'm not mistaken.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kopF4muvF0c&list=PL02C318B574CD948D

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1 hour ago, Hatem said:

That's pretty neat that you used rebar between that new piece of mahogany and the bottom section of the original transom.  That's the perfect example of improvising a great solution as you're working on something like that.  Some people would've just put a pair of wooden dowels and glued them in to connect the two pieces, but rebar is 100x better.  And a solid piece of mahogany is better than 3 layers of marine plywood laminated together to get that thickness.  And you actually had a horizontal seam in that transom and it was fine, how about that?  Because you know there was quite a bit of strain on that joint from the weight and force and tilting of the outboard but with the rebar, glue and fiberglass it was solid as a rock.  Awesome.

And need clearance for them when they're turning.  Turns out that boat came with either a 200HP or 260HP sterndrive, so he doesn't really need 400HP. 

I guess Chaparral made 2 models of the 244 Cuddy Delux, one with a 200HP I/O and another one with a 260HP.  So current owner was truthful about the original sterndrive motor being 200HP.  In that case you really don't need a pair of those 200HP outboards and make that stern that much heavier.  You can take a look at the NADA listing for that model year here: http://www.nadaguides.com/Boats/1981/CHAPARRAL-BOATS .  Knowing the value of the boat should help you with your negotiating.

Definitely.  You're still a young man, plenty left in the tank.  Have you seen these Frisco series on YT?  They're pretty popular in the boating forum circuit because this guy bought a Sea Ray 220 and after buying it he finds a soft spot on the deck floor and then decides to open it up only to find out the thing was pretty rotted in a major way.  Deck, transom, stringer and all the foam between the deck and stringers was almost completely water-logged.  He ends up taking the entire thing apart and basically rebuilding the whole boat minus the hull and whatever fiberglass cap is on that thing.  Puts a brand new Merc motor and sterndrive and just does an outstanding job with that.  He shows how he cuts the new stringers and glues them in place and all the buttering and glassing and chopstrand he used and explains it really well.  He even explains all the mixing for the thick cake he puts in the corners and how he mixes the glassing etc.  I highly recommend watching the entire series.  It's pretty long because it's a MAJOR project and he also goes into some personal stuff like his mother died during the process and other things like that but you can skip through all of that and get to all the nitty gritty and you'll see how easy it is to do your boat compared to this one and you'll learn a lot.  And yours is MUCH easier than what this fella had to do.  He's also in Texas if I'm not mistaken.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kopF4muvF0c&list=PL02C318B574CD948D

I'll take a look, thanks

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3 hours ago, stangman said:

I watched the whole series, great information!

And shortly after he lost his marriage.  Not saying it was the boat, but all time spent on it and not his wife probably didn't help.  Definitely something to consider.

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3 hours ago, stangman said:

I watched the whole series, great information!

Yeah it's pretty good.  That guy is an animal lol.  He went all out with that thing but then again, sometimes that's the best thing to do if you're willing to make the sacrifice.  I couldn't remember and thought he put in a whole new motor and sterndrive but he didn't.  He actually replaced a lot of parts on the outdrive and made it practically brand new.  He also goes into great detail about the enamel and hardener he used with his HVLP gun to spray the outdrive and make it look brand new.  I thought that was great.

He went the poly way and not epoxy FYI.  Something to be mindful about if and when you decide to do your stuff.  He does a great job explaining the mixing of the tabbing & glassing/resin and all that stuff.  Adding the chop strand and fumed silica to the resin to strengthen the filet (or as he called it the peanut butter mix) to fill in all the gaps and round the corners etc., really good stuff.  He also used closed cell foam which is brilliant.  That stuff doesn't absorb any moisture and he made channels at the bottom of the stringers near the keel so that if there ever was any water intrusion that the foam wouldn't absorb, it can find its way out the bilge drain.  So many little cool details like that.

He also didn't use marine plywood.  He didn't think it was necessary not only because of cost, but because he knew he wasn't going to leave a single millimeter of bare wood.  He covered everything with at least 2 coats of glass.  He even applied resin on all 4 edges of every piece of stringer and bulkheads, some before installing them.  Then he glassed the living daylights out of everything.

One cool thing he mentioned that I thought was pretty interesting is when the laid the stringer down on the fiberglass hull (which if you noticed he spent a couple of days grinding that hull down to bare material which was incredible), he applied a thick bead of that liquid nail under the stringer.  He didn't just glue the stringer down to the hull, he kept the stringers up a good 3/8" or so with those little tabs of rigid insulation and that space between was filled with the adhesive which he mentioned is better than applying the stringers tight onto the hull so that when the hull is bouncing and pounding off the water and it flexes, that thick bead acts as a shock absorber so those joints have a lesser chance of cracking.  I thought that was a pretty cool detail and made a ton of sense.  So many little things like that all over that entire series.

He did spend a good amount of money.  The initial batch for all the fiberglass materials was something like $1,600.  Then add all the foam and all the additional resin that he probably had to get, along with the sheets of rigid insulation that he used to make templates of for the transom and deck and some of the specialty tools he had to get weren't cheap, either.  But if you have the basic tools (most of the stuff you'll need is all the standard stuff we all have - cordless and corded drills, drill bits, saws, grinders, belt sanders, clamps, screws, glue etc, you're almost there. 

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Unfortunately my purchase is not going to happen, lowest seller will go is $1,500. I just can't see him getting that much and my wife would probably divorce me if I paid that much for a 36 year old boat with no motor and a partially built transom. Must say though after watching the videos I was stoked to start some major grinding.

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9 hours ago, Dennis A said:

Grinding fiberglass in high heat requires this:

Is that flex tube plugged into an AC unit?  lol.  That stuff sucks a$$.  It's one of the worst things to grind or sand.  It turns into a fine powder that actually floats in the air for a while.  Kinda like horsehair plaster.  Plus it has silica in it which is the WORST thing for your lungs.   

This guy is great..  Andy from Boatworks Today probably does the best glassing & gelcoat application instructional videos out there.  He's repairing/replacing this transom on an old Boston Whaler and it's got a nasty bend or curve to it and the way he handled that problem is great. 

 

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2 hours ago, Hatem said:

Is that flex tube plugged into an AC unit?  lol.  That stuff sucks a$$.  It's one of the worst things to grind or sand.  It turns into a fine powder that actually floats in the air for a while.  Kinda like horsehair plaster.  Plus it has silica in it which is the WORST thing for your lungs.   

This guy is great..  Andy from Boatworks Today probably does the best glassing & gelcoat application instructional videos out there.  He's repairing/replacing this transom on an old Boston Whaler and it's got a nasty bend or curve to it and the way he handled that problem is great. 

 

Yes,  tyvek suit, flex pipe and a 5000 btu window air.  Andy is a true professional.

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My thoughts........

If your an all around handyman type and enjoy the type of effort this will require then Go for it!!  

As for the Bronco pulling it....its a big boat, and its not the pulling that's an issue, its the Stopping!! :)  That all said I love the ol Chaps.....mine is the 1973 variety :) Very similar actually. 

 

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picked it up relatively inexpensive and use it for offshore fishing here in Southern California. replaced all the electrical etc. Issue is the range. Its only a 55 gallon tank :(  I get on average 125 miles before I need to start worrying if I'll make it back :) 

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1973?!  That looks amazing for a 45 year-old boat!  The hull looks nice and shiny, that thing is in excellent condition.  The seat bases are longer and have the foot rest on them unlike the 81 which looks like they're mounted on storage units.  Did you do any body work to it?

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