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ExGavalonnj

Can the 230 or 250 Suncoast's handle the ocean?

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Hello, I am looking to replace my 210 SS with something new and preferably with an outboard. I was looking at the 230 or 250 Suncoast but my dealer said that they didn't have a deep enough V for comfortable ocean use (NJ). 

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In general terms for most people asking this question.  I totally agree with his logic.

 

Too late to change a fully loaded boat off shore to a deep V hull.  Deep water builds tall waves in a matter of minutes as that terrible black sky approaches & the winds go to 40..50...60 so quickly. 

Been there enough times.  Also been very lucky.  Have had locked up fingers from squeezing the wheel or grab rails for over a hour during a fast squall.

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7 hours ago, ExGavalonnj said:

Hello, I am looking to replace my 210 SS with something new and preferably with an outboard. I was looking at the 230 or 250 Suncoast but my dealer said that they didn't have a deep enough V for comfortable ocean use (NJ). 

He's probably right.  If you compare it to say the 267ssx which is the nearest thing to the 250 suncoast, you can see the 267 has a bit more hull area and even a bit more freeboard.

digi57567371_l.jpg

 

chaparral_267ssx_deadrise_2017.jpg

You'll probably get bounced around a bit more in heavier chop and more water will splash over the bow, too. 

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10 hours ago, ExGavalonnj said:

Hello, I am looking to replace my 210 SS with something new and preferably with an outboard. I was looking at the 230 or 250 Suncoast but my dealer said that they didn't have a deep enough V for comfortable ocean use (NJ). 

An honest assessment from your dealer.  There has been a topic or two here from Suncoast owners that were disappointed with its' open water capabilities.

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I agree with the assessment of your dealer too, we were looking starting with Sunesta, and worked our way to SSX.  Coastal was a consideration, but my wife has Parkinson's, so more swim platform (easier for her to get around on) over outboard won.

We ended up with the the 247 SSX, it is the 25' vs of the 267 SSX mentioned above, just two feet of hull shorter (all specs are the same on dead rise, draft, bridge clearance (since they do not state freeboard in the specs this is the closest to being able to tell how much boat is above water), etc.).  From what I can tell (looking at pics on-line of the two and having sat in the two) we loose some of the bench area behind helm and passenger seats, and some space on the forward/aft facing transom bench.  All else looks identical.

Comparing the 247 SSX specs to 250 Suncoast for ride/sea handling I would look at (and I am not an expert, so correct me if I looked at this wrong) Bridge Clearance with out a tower (this should be a good indication of freeboard potentially), Deadrise (higher number deeper V), and Draft engine up (how much of the boat is under the water for the hull to handle seas).

Here is a copy/paste of the 250 and the 247.  I wish I would have taken some pics the other day, our boat was put on a work rack, so I could flush engine and wash, right next to a 230 Suncoast (same as the 250 just two less feet on it).  You could definitely see the difference in the hulls, and our boat was sitting taller on the same height rack.

250 Suncoast

LOA w/ Swim Platform: 24' 10"

Beam:  8' 6"

Bridge Clearance: 4' 10"

Bridge Clearance with Arch Tower: 7' 11"

Bridge Clearance with Arch Tower Folded Down: 6' 1"

Deadrise:  20°

Fuel Capacity: 75 gal

Holding Tank Capacity:  3.80 gal

Water Capacity:  13.50 gal

Draft Down: 32.00"

Draft Up:  15.00"

Max HP: 300 HP

Dry Weight w/ Engines:  4100 lbs

Passenger Capacity (NMMA):  14/1935 lbs

  

247 SSX 

LOA w/ Swim Platform:  25'

Beam:  8' 6"

Bridge Clearance:  5' 4"

Bridge Clearance with Arch Tower:  8' 1"

Bridge Clearance with Arch Tower Folded Down:  6'

Deadrise:  22°

Fuel Capacity: 65 gal

Holding Tank Capacity:  3.80 gal

Water Capacity:  10.00 gal

Draft Down: 35.00"

Draft Up:  23.00"

Max HP: 380 HP

Dry Weight w/ Engines:  4700 lbs

Passenger Capacity (NMMA):  14/2006 lbs

May be more info (and some you probably already knew) than what you needed :)  We just went through the same decisions in July.  These are the things I looked at for the best ride.  We may one day venture into the ocean (just a longer run to get to), but definitely go in the lower Chesapeake and wanted something that can handle a little more and be more comfortable.  We have been very happy with our decision.

If you want to stick with the OB's another consideration in the same "family" as Chaparral could be the Robalo R247?

 

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First and formost!! Its an open bow boat that can get swamped very easy. 

If you get hit with a wave broadside or the bow goes below a big wave. Your going to take on a ton of water. You might want to install one or two extra pumps on board if thats your plan.

Two years ago I saw a bow rider going up the Cape Cod Canal. They hit a 2' wave head on, will they where not very happy. they were wet from head to toe. 

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I have had my suncoast out in the gulf during 1 to 2ft waves. It cuts through them with ease and rides very stable. No harsh pounding.  Also very dry. 

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^^^^^^^ this

That size boat would serve fine in calm seas and good conditions. Your willingness to get tossed around and preparedness for rough seas needs to increase as you move smaller and to an open bow vs a center or dual console with tall hull sides and tons of bow flare.

So I think it would be fine on nice days, tough when the weather catches you by surprise.

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We boat the Gulf in our 250 Suncoast; 2'-3' seas are about the limit, mostly because these boats ride too flat with a low bow height. So although the boat feels solid and stable, the rougher seas will put too much water over the bow. To be honest boating in any boat <25' is not a lot of fun, water over the bow or not.

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Very true Swatt.

I f the wind picks up offshore AND swings around to blow you off shore ?

MAYDAY MAYDAY USCG...….. I am in a open bow boat . 23' long with 8 big adults & children.  We are 5 miles offshore of the inlet. We are barely keeping up with the waves that are  keeping the bilge pump running. Send help now.

Sadly many 1st time offshore boaters find that condition all too soon. .A boat is never like a car. Pull off the road & wait out the wind.

Personal abilities are a big factor.  My coordination has reached a point  that I will need to rent a double , side by side slip. To dock safely next year.

EDIT

Worse is to arrive at the INLET & find sure waves that will flip your boat if you risk it.  we are then screwed . Too rough for transfers. Different sized USCG compared to the bowrider. Call the helicopter.. Or run the boat on to the very calm beach.  Done that 2 times.  

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. Mistake 1  I am in a open bow boat . 23'

Mistake 2   23' long with 8 big adults & children.

Mistake 3   We are 5 miles offshore of the inlet. We are barely keeping up with the waves that are  keeping the bilge            running. 

Mistake 4  We are 5 miles offshore of the inlet. We are barely keeping up with the waves that are  keeping the bilge pump running. Send help now.

Mistake 5   Trying to run an inlet ,with that type of boat, with those types of waves will lead t disaster. also not listening to and not watching the weather for signs of weather approaching . Knowing when to cut and run for it . Now if you had an escape plan, donning life jackets, having a snap bridle for all the pax, a "go bag" with a spare hand held and a spare flare kit, whistle, and light etc.

And of course WARM WATER otherwise you`ll be dead in 3 hours or less.

 

Having been to the East Wall of the canyon (109 mies)even a 41 footer is no match for the ocean when it gets angry.When waves crash onto the bow you can only hold on and face into it. When you look to the side and see a wall of water 20 feet above you  and then see yourself onto   a 20 foot mountain of water  looking down , it`s not a very fun day.

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No...

I would never take an open bow of that size into big water unless it's self bailing. 

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Well put  BT.   There are just so many things that MUST WORK PERFECTLY when off shore. Then  things start  going the wrong way.  

Never B S yourself about .  WE can do it...….As soon as you hear the owner / driver say that ?

You may not be home for dinner.

Again

 

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I wouldn't take a SunCoast or bowriders in general offshore. They just aren't designed for it: only 1 bilge pump, insufficient reserve floatation, easy to take water over the bow and stern and swamping the cockpit / bilge, single engine, single battery, no built in VHF radio with tall antenna, no radar/AIS, etc. I'd stick to inland waters or remain in sight of the beach on a calm day. If your boat gets shoved around by the wakes of large boats in inland waters, then ocean conditions are going to murder you.

 

The real offshore boats are noticeably heavier, sturdier built, bigger engines, beefier batteries, higher freeboards, taller windshields, and a ton more convenience and lifesaving equipment in case the p00p hits the fan. 

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I've taken my 276ssx out past 70 miles offshore several times.  I've always checked the forecast and removed the carpeting for the water to drain much better and the last time I went out was with my new windlass which has a 7" x 3" cutout in the front of the bow.  Most of the cockpit drains drain straight out through their own thru-hulls.  This winter I'll be adding an additional weep hole at the bottom of the anchor locker because of that with another clamshell so that there are 2 of them.  I've dealt with huge swells and water coming overboard and draining out easily almost like my buddy's center console.  Suncoast might be a bit small to handle all that.

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I went with the 250 last year and it has been fine for our needs of just going along the coast between AC and Cape May. Only thing I haven't done yet that I wanted to do was cross to Delaware.

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Just be.....VERY SURE.....of your gasoline consumption if the weather turns ugly suddenly. Which is a impossibility if you only do the trips in a stretch of ideal weather

Simple

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