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dloreski

Beginner Advice - 1992 Chaparral 2200SLC

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Hi everyone.
I'm new here and never owned a boat.
Just bought a house at the lake and looking for my first boat.
We test drove a new Sweetwater tritoon with a 150 and LOVED it. 
BUT, with spending all the money on the house, not really wanting to shell out 40K for 2 or 3 years.
Just looking to cruise around and tube.
I found this boat at the lake. It's a 1992 Chaparral 2200 SLC with new upholstery, new cover, and original merc cruiser io. Includes tandem axle trailer also
They are asking $5,750 for it.
Going to test drive it Sunday and if we like it plan on having the local shop look it over.
Any thoughts?
- Dave

Chaparal 2200slc.jpg

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One piece of advice that stands true, if YOU are happy with it, then that is all that matters. If you have a single doubt, keep looking. Does it run well? what speed and rpm? how does it handle with a full load of people? Any records? 

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For a 27 year old boat it looks nice, from the one pic.  Have your shop go over it good.  check compression, vibration, bellows, look for leaks, etc etc.

Make sure they check the trailer (frame, brakes, electrical).

If you buy it and then the engine goes... it may not be worth fixing.

good luck.

 

 

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Man that's an oldie but sure looks nice.  Tritoons and pontoons, new ones, are all the rage at my lake place as well but you aren't going to get into one for five grand.  Bowriders are dying a slow death.  I'd water test it for a nice long ride and go for it if it meets your expectations.  Bet they have over 2k into the upholstery.  

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7 minutes ago, Futzin' said:

check the floor and transom . . . 

Was thinking the same but the boat wouldn't be worth the upholstery job with rotted stringers or transom.  Stranger things have happened I suppose.  Can only think someone had some attachment to it to put the money into it.  

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Plenty of folks will put lipstick on a pig to pretty it up. 

She looks nice, but at that age due diligence is required, especially if she's lived outdoors.

First time used boat buyers often aren't sure what to watch for; that's where some of us come in . . . 

I've purchased a 1981 and a 1978 in my past . . . 

The '78 Browning Aerocraft Monte Carlo II is in the background here . . . helluva nice boat

y4mnwBGTrBymY-9FN4piMr6ziUx0qNvNuygF5cyy

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17 hours ago, dloreski said:

Hi everyone.
I'm new here and never owned a boat.
Just bought a house at the lake and looking for my first boat.
We test drove a new Sweetwater tritoon with a 150 and LOVED it. 
BUT, with spending all the money on the house, not really wanting to shell out 40K for 2 or 3 years.
Just looking to cruise around and tube.
I found this boat at the lake. It's a 1992 Chaparral 2200 SLC with new upholstery, new cover, and original merc cruiser io. Includes tandem axle trailer also
They are asking $5,750 for it.
Going to test drive it Sunday and if we like it plan on having the local shop look it over.
Any thoughts?
- Dave

Chaparal 2200slc.jpg

That looks really nice.  And that's also short money, even for it's age.  The few things I would do.  The most common problem with these boats is exactly what Futzin mentioned.  You're new to boating so you probably aren't familiar with the construction of these boats, this particular style and era, so familiarize yourself with that more so than anything else because the main thing that happens to these boats is water intrusion which ends up rotting out the floor and frame (stringers & bulkheads).

Unlike boats that are fiberglass hulls and tops, these have a combination of a fiberglass hull, forward bow area and helm but have a plywood floor that is carpeted and sitting on wood stringers.  In time, it's inevitable that rain, lake/ocean water ends up on that floor and seeps through it to the bottom of the hull and soak the stringers until they rot.  The rear of the boat (transom) has its outer layer made out of fiberglass and is part of the lower hull and sides, but the inside layers are plywood with layers of chopstrand & fiberglass and that is where the sterndrive keyway (cutout) is.  Through all the many years, that cutout is susceptible to water intrusion and when it gets to those plywood layers, it soaks them up and rots.  Repairing the floor, stringers and transom is not a small job, and there is always a likelihood that there is some moisture in there.  It's just inevitable, only what degree is it?  So you need to find that out before anything else.  At least that's what I would do.  But it looks great, and nice red color.  Tomnjo will love that! :)

Some examples to give you an idea and I don't mean to scare you or anything like that, just heads up.  That boat could be very dry also.  

So what could possibly be under that carpeted, plywood floor?  There is also -- more than likely -- to be foam like in this picture filled in all between the stringers, bulkheads and floor which if it does gets wet, it absorbs that water and almost never dries, making the boat also much heavier.  You can see the foam to the right.

replacing-stringers-floor-maybe-transom-

Rotted transom.

Transom%20Rot2.JPG

Best thing to do is have a surveyor look at it and they can usually spot this stuff by either tapping on the hull in many places or even drilling a small hole (which will be tough to get the owner to agree to) but definitely check for moisture and rot.

 

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14 hours ago, Futzin' said:

Plenty of folks will put lipstick on a pig to pretty it up. 

She looks nice, but at that age due diligence is required, especially if she's lived outdoors.

First time used boat buyers often aren't sure what to watch for; that's where some of us come in . . . 

I've purchased a 1981 and a 1978 in my past . . . 

The '78 Browning Aerocraft Monte Carlo II is in the background here . . . helluva nice boat

y4mnwBGTrBymY-9FN4piMr6ziUx0qNvNuygF5cyy

You get the most awesome diversity of boats where you lake.  I remember that thread you posted with all the pics or the different boats from mahogany Chris Crafts  to Chaps to pontoons to some other beauties like this one.  But first thing I noticed in that pic is that it sucks getting old!  All 5 adults are still in the water and look at the buoyant kid, he's almost all the way out already LOL! :haha-7383:

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Since we are going down this road, one of the tricks people will pull to flip a boat with rotted floor and stringers is to redeck over the rotted plywood, recarpet it and sell it to a new boater who doesn't speak the language yet.  A boat as old as the subject boat has a substantially higher probability of rot issues.  The qualities of wood in a boat are great and hard to beat but that the massive downside is rot.  

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