Jump to content
Ranger

Hull Advice - Disappointed

Recommended Posts

Hi -  EU Chap Sunsesta Surf owner here (late 2017 model). After 220hrs the hull has small cracks all around the swim platform and a large crack internally (above the ballast) where the cockpit meets the hull. The first time it went back in the water this year the transom started leaking around the drive (no GRP inside of the mounting bolts - just paint - so it just gave way). When looking closely in and around the hull, the finish internally, grp work is really poor with air pockets and paint over unfinished work. Lots of other small issues such as a multitude of small bubbles/holes in the exterior gel coat which came out when the hull was polished, bolts needing to be replaced as they rusted out.

Is this type of build quality normal for a Chap or is this one a lemon? Hard to compare as we dont have a lot of them in Europe. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ranger said:

Hi -  EU Chap Sunsesta Surf owner here (late 2017 model). After 220hrs the hull has small cracks all around the swim platform and a large crack internally (above the ballast) where the cockpit meets the hull. The first time it went back in the water this year the transom started leaking around the drive (no GRP inside of the mounting bolts - just paint - so it just gave way). When looking closely in and around the hull, the finish internally, grp work is really poor with air pockets and paint over unfinished work. Lots of other small issues such as a multitude of small bubbles/holes in the exterior gel coat which came out when the hull was polished, bolts needing to be replaced as they rusted out.

Is this type of build quality normal for a Chap or is this one a lemon? Hard to compare as we dont have a lot of them in Europe. 

There are always a few issues of sloppy workmanship here and there, but what you're describing seems unusually excessive. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s common to find a few issues and have them fixed by the dealer. What you describe sounds excessive though. Do you have pictures?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you buy the boat used ?

Of did you hit something very hard with the drive section.  All the small cracks & a larger one.   Then had it repaired ? I can not see any other way to have rusting bolts in a 1 year old boat. They should have been S S  Sounds like a drive gasket was left off also ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you bought the boat new, this should be covered under the hull warranty.  If you are the second owner and did the transfer, ditto.  If either are true, I would recommend engaging Chaparral ASAP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like another "drive by " poster. They come on here, complain about quality then never come back to give specifics. Possibly SeaRay employees?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would be interesting to know where in Europe, and how many boats does Chaparral sell there a year?  I remember Keith was in Hong Kong and went to a boat show and saw a Signature 310 on display.  Wonder how big the foreign market is for Chaparral.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for not responding earlier. Here are some images. We purchased the boat new from a UK dealer and have been trying to get it sorted out but not getting a lot of response at the moment. Thought I would wait to get a response before posting.

We have gone ahead and completed some of the works on the transom. Here is some of the internal finish inside. We lifted the boat and filled the bottom with water to identify where the leak was coming from. There was no grp around the fixings so the ply gave way and it all loosened up. Another general pic of what the finish is like internally. And another pic of the drive removed and open transom. This was strengthened and grp done properly. 

 

 

DSC_4523.JPG

DSC_4808.JPG

IMG-20180718-WA0020.jpg

DSC_4277.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pic of the finish after a polish revealed small holes in the final paint finish and gel coat. Another of the finish inside. 

DSC_3304 (2).JPG

DSC_4278 (1).JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fixing point of the transom and stern drive. Crack sitting above the balast looking inside the balast locker. Transom has paint and no grp? 

DSC_4805.JPG

IMG_5140.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That hull looks just like a storm bashed around boat. The excessive staining is from being outdoors...……….. Hull should have been destroyed at the factory.

Another storm hull sold.

Find the HIN number . Run a check on the locations of buyers & sellers before you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Ranger said:

Fixing point of the transom and stern drive. Crack sitting above the balast looking inside the balast locker. Transom has paint and no grp? 

DSC_4805.JPG

Yep, and TBH, they usually don't GRP or cover the cutout at the factories (at least I haven't seen it) which in this case is basically plywood core edges because they always assume that it is going to be a water-tight fitting going in there, between the transom assembly and outdrive to the inner transom shield that bolts to it through those drilled holes there.  And it also appears that they over-cut that keyway because there is a bit of space between the holes and the cutout on the portside and barely anything on this starboard side.

I would say that good thing you noticed it now before that plywood really got soaked and rotted but judging from the other picture, it's already far gone IMO and I think the entire 2 or 3 layers of plywood will need to be replaced.  Removing just the rot and filling it with new material of whatever kind is not the way to go, especially in the last pic below.

32 minutes ago, Ranger said:

Another of the finish inside. 

DSC_4278 (1).JPG

And this here looks like whatever they're fastening on the outside was fastened with non-stainless steel nuts and bolts because they've completely rusted.  That's just terrible.

 

50 minutes ago, Ranger said:

 This was strengthened and grp done properly. 

DSC_4808.JPG

That will need to be cut out completely and all rotted plywood replaced somehow.  Not sure how they will do that without completely replacing the entire plywood transom core.  That's a structural area and really shouldn't be pieced in.  You can see how much pressure is on that bolt or stud by how it compressed the rotted plywood. 

I thought they stopped using plywood on their transoms? 

53 minutes ago, Ranger said:

.Another general pic of what the finish is like internally.  

IMG-20180718-WA0020.jpg

This is just awful fiberglass work.  Shame on whomever was responsible for the work and for quality control inspections.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Bt Doctur said:

Very poor construction and what is this gap where you see wood.

1372119745_DSC_4278_1_thumb_JPG_c566e63d

I noticed that and didn't even know what to say about it.  Looks like the top cap has two pieces with lips on them to join together and they weren't formed very well and ended up with a gap that needed to be filled in with some material to fasten the two flanges together.  Why there needs to be a connection there and two separate pieces is beyond me.  That cap should be a single piece all the way.  I'm sure there's a reason for it but it looks poorly done. 

And all those 6 nuts on the left that have loads of sealant all over them are most likely the hinge for the surf gate.  The wire going through the top and the completely rusted out bolts and nuts to the right are probably to hold the hydraulic motor and actuator for the surf gate.  It's a pretty cool feature for that type of specific sport boat and the rest of the boat is probably in good condition with that unique forward-facing VP outdrive, but the workmanship in the bilge is just terrible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Bt Doctur said:

Very poor construction and what is this gap where you see wood.

1372119745_DSC_4278_1_thumb_JPG_c566e63d

Good point.  Im not qualified to say if this gap is a manfuacturing defect (could be), design defect  (didnt handle loads under normal use,), or shipping damage (from Nashville?), or storm damage, but it doesnt look right. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cyclops2 said:

That hull looks just like a storm bashed around boat. The excessive staining is from being outdoors...……….. Hull should have been destroyed at the factory.

Another storm hull sold.

Find the HIN number . Run a check on the locations of buyers & sellers before you.

Purchased brand new... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it's damaged repair.  That looks like the top cap is two separate pieces meant to join at those flanges and they should be formed to fit snug to one another but ended up not being the case and there was a gap between the two flanges that they filled with a strip of plywood.  And you can easily notice that it was wider at one point and was cut with a saw, as evidenced by a poor and uneven cut.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be contacting Chap directly go get that boat replaced with a new one.  Before any more work is done to it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎9‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 1:06 PM, rjbergen said:

It’s common to find a few issues and have them fixed by the dealer. What you describe sounds excessive though. Do you have pictures?

See to me this is the wrong answer.  I buy 50-60k vehicles every two years and never have a few issues to sort out, buying a 50-100k boat makes is unacceptable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, soldier4402 said:

See to me this is the wrong answer.  I buy 50-60k vehicles every two years and never have a few issues to sort out, buying a 50-100k boat makes is unacceptable

The manufacturing processes are vastly different. Cars are produced on an assembly line where one worked does the same small task time and time again. They become very adept at completing their task quickly and correctly. Whereas a boat is not produced in that fashion. A few skilled workers assemble the boat and perform multiple tasks each. With how many different steps each worker is required to complete in the process, it’s not impossible to miss something, or rush a step and not make it perfect. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×