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Chap243

Engine Removal Proceedure

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Has anybody ever removed your own engine? If so, how difficult a process is this? How did you get the hinged seat/engine cover off without damaging it and what contraption did you use to remove the engine. I have a tractor with a bucket but don't think it will go high enough.

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If its the boat in the pic and the engine hatch/cover is part of the rear deck , locate a higher lift point, stand/support hatch upright, lift motor up and out, move boat, place motor on pallet

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8 minutes ago, Bt Doctur said:

If its the boat in the pic and the engine hatch/cover is part of the rear deck , locate a higher lift point, stand/support hatch upright, lift motor up and out, move boat, place motor on pallet

So leave the hatch/cover/seat hinged and disconnect the lifting actuator, and fold it over onto the swim platform until you can get the motor out, then flip it back over? All done slowly and carefully obviously? Those covers are heavy.

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Last one I did I was a 31 Formula twin. Unhooked the lift screw, ties a rope around the hatch  and supported it vertically , straight up.Then pulled the motor

Or carefully lay it rearward as much as possable and support the edge hanging off the stern

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Is the question about the 264 Sunesta? If so, there are 2 hinges with three bolts each. With a buddy behind the hatch putting foot pressure on each hinge, open it, skinny in and remove the six nuts and washers from the inside. Disconnect the lift arm from the top bracket, disconnect the two lift assists and all wiring. The hatch has to be supported with a block on each side, and it’s best to have another set of hands holding it as backup. With the seat assembly installed, it weighs about 150 pounds and will break your back, arm, hand, whatever if it falls on you. You’ll be on your belly and back doing this work. Shimmy back out, then carefully close without letting it scoot. Remove both hinges and bolts. With someone on the grab bar in front and someone on the swim deck, lift it straight up and walk it carefully off the boat. This is a two person job given the tight space, bulk and weight. Be careful and know you have to clear the transom walkthrough. The hatch will not lay back without breaking it, and it’s weight will bustout the hinge mounting area on both sides if put up vertical. It’s not a cheap part and hard to find. Room is needed to pull the engine, so pull it on this boat. A suggestion. Tape moving blankets over all of the cosmetic surfaces, including the swim deck or there will be fiberglass scufffs, cuts, etc. No need to make more work. Another suggestion. Don’t remove the seat and track assembly despite being tempted to. It’s a real pain to install and align.

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How about lifting it off with the same device that I use to pull the engine after disconnecting the hinges? I have a friend with a backhoe, thinking about using that.

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I've found it safer, easier and quicker by hand with someone helping.  Much less time compared to rigging it and positioning a piece of equipment.  The bar on the front is a good lift point.  But, there are no lift points on the sides or rear.  A suggested caution.  Don't pull or lift using the seat assembly.  The track is fastened to the hatch by 6 or 8 bolts (sorry, I forget the exact count).  The glass is so thin in this area they will tear right out.  The good news, this part of the hatch is not cosmetic and can be fixed if damaged.  Rule one, safety.  Rule two, no collateral damage.  Once the hatch is off (about 15 minutes), the engine is out inside of two hours (less with preparation).  While an overhead hoist or mobile gantry are preferred, a track hoe, Bobcat, JLG, etc. are okay.  A suggestion and caution.  If the hydraulics are jumpy or your hand not rock stead on the controls, be careful because a swinging engine can create a lot of damage quickly.  Back to rule one and two.         

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11 hours ago, Chap243 said:

How about lifting it off with the same device that I use to pull the engine after disconnecting the hinges? I have a friend with a backhoe, thinking about using that.

What's on the end of the backhoe, a large bucket or a small one?  You could do it with either but preferably a large bucket if you have straps that are long enough to wrap around the hatch through the front bar that you hold as if you're lifting the seat and then straight underneath through to the rear bar and up to the fingers on the bucket.  That way the straps are pinned inside the bars and no chance of them slipping off if your buddy accidentally jerks the backhoe or whatever.  That would be the way I would do it if I didn't have the manpower to do it by hand, which is the way I did mine.  I lift all sorts of things like that on my job sites with buckets on large backhoes and even small bobcats.  But you definitely need those straps.

Took my hatch off last year to get into the rear of the bilge and clean it and inspect the transom plate and all the stuff that you can't get to even with the hatch wide open.  I wish I took pics but I'll tell you exactly how I did it.  I put a pair of 2x4x8s sideways across the top of the bed on my truck and put a sheet of 3/4 plywood over that, then backed right up to the swim platform.  The plywood was further up against he cab.  I raised the hatch, disconnected the 2 screw pistons at the top where they meet the hatch (really easy with just a pin removed).  Once I loosened the nuts on all 6 bolts on the top of the hinges, I put blue tape on them so they wouldn't fall into the back of the  bilge then finished unscrewing the heads from outside.  This worked great because I didn't have to loosen them from inside which isn't that easy.  With my son holding the front bar, set the hatch back down carefully then I grabbed the rear bar (while I'm on the swim platform and my son at the front bar), lifted it up and I just pivoted while he walked through the transom walkway  onto the swim platform and we both stepped off the swim platform onto the truck bed  and laid the hatch on the plywood setup. 

Why are you thinking of removing the engine?

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Yep, going to rebuild or replace. Motor has been burning a lot of oil lately and I don't know why. Debating now the rebuild vs. new long block route. If I go long block, I may try to do this myself over the winter as a project.

Any suggestions as rebuild existing vs new long block.

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I've done more rebuilds than I care to remember, and have the tools and access to the necessary specificity equipment to keep the costs down. That said, with the advent of CNC machines it's almost impossible to beat the cost of a turn key crate engine. Shop around, price your rebuild parts, and I think you will end up with a long block. Two year warranty, and as the R&R labor is on you, starting out new is always a better option. Do the starter rebuild while you are in there along with careful coupler inspection, and go through the risers and manifolds as now is the time. Take your time with engine alignment and your coupler, and gimbel bearing will thank you. I'm really good at alignments but I will never be really fast.  W

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7 minutes ago, Wingnut said:

I've done more rebuilds than I care to remember, and have the tools and access to the necessary specificity equipment to keep the costs down. That said, with the advent of CNC machines it's almost impossible to beat the cost of a turn key crate engine. Shop around, price your rebuild parts, and I think you will end up with a long block. Two year warranty, and as the R&R labor is on you, starting out new is always a better option. Do the starter rebuild while you are in there along with careful coupler inspection, and go through the risers and manifolds as now is the time. Take your time with engine alignment and your coupler, and gimbel bearing will thank you. I'm really good at alignments but I will never be really fast.  W

+1 on the long block.  I too have found that getting a long block, whether it is an automotive, marine, pwc, etc from a company that does even small volume production is cheaper and with a better warranty than rebuilding myself.  Economy of scale.  I have also seen this with drives and transmissions.  

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25 minutes ago, Chap243 said:

Motor has been burning a lot of oil lately and I don't know why.

How many hours do you have on the engine?  What oil do you use?  What does your typical operation look like, cruising on plane for long stretches, water sports, trolling, mix, etc?

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Long block for sure. But, once in awhile a complete NOS engine can be had at a decent price. 

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49 minutes ago, MonkeySeaII said:

do you have a Merc or VP?  What size engine?

Its a VP 5.7 GXI, 320 hp

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29 minutes ago, Dennis A said:

How many hours do you have on the engine?  What oil do you use?  What does your typical operation look like, cruising on plane for long stretches, water sports, trolling, mix, etc?

About 430 hrs. Have always used Mobil 1 . It has gone through almost 5 qts since May and about 50hrs.

Anybody know anything good or bad about Michigan Motors. They have a new longblock there for about $3500 deer.

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They just had to pull my motor this summer to replace the starter, bolts would not budge.  The 256 is one heavy hatch also while it was out we cleaned and repainted the pan, changed the drive coupler, and also the flywheel plate was all rusted as well.  Checked all the hoses.

I agree a long block is the best way to go if you want to replace unless you have a very TRUST WORTH MECHANIC.

 

Also a quart of hour is not great, but really a lot cheaper then rebuilding if you motor is still strong.    Not sure how many hours you boat a year but or if you have a lot of cash burning a hole in you pocket just look at the big picture.

 

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5 minutes ago, Chap243 said:
39 minutes ago, Dennis A said:

How many hours do you have on the engine?  What oil do you use?  What does your typical operation look like, cruising on plane for long stretches, water sports, trolling, mix, etc?

About 430 hrs. Have always used Mobil 1

15w50?

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I have seen lots of complete Merc 496 Mags on the used market with low hours.  You see a lot of high performance guys pulling them to upgrade to big power.   Not so many VP engines tho.  

"Funny story", my buddy bought a brand new 2017 Cobalt last year.  It has the VP 300 engine.  He lost most of this summer to have a brand new engine put in under warranty because there was some issue with the remote oil filter bracket on that particular engine.  Evidently it broke off while running 35 mph, dumping all of the oil into the bilge and toasting the engine!

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What year motor and weight Mobil1 is in there?  There’s a specific spec. on a few years of that engine because it was picky.  If the oil that’s in there is too light and it’s running strong, it might be the wrong oil causing the problem.  Has compression been checked?  I’d do this first.

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3 hours ago, Wingnut said:

I'm really good at alignments but I will never be really fast.  W

Quote of the week.  Aligning anything is never to be rushed, that is unless you'd like a do-over.

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