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jdsdls05

Stainless Manifolds and tubes

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On ‎11‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 3:40 PM, cyclops2 said:

I agree with you completely Hatem.  Time to pull all the exhaust castings apart & see what is still salvageable.  I certainly would. The leaks can go back into the engine on shut down . Or spray outward all over the engine & ruin connectors.   We are talking hot enough water & pressure to ruin wires, connectors  or bilge pumps. Belts.    Heck you have been lucky enough to know what could be coming hours from a return in bad weather...…….. Do it. We will both sleep better.  Good luck on the repairs.  Post back for others to check their boats.   Save some others from a ugly break down.

The best to you.

Thanks, Clops.  You're right that we will BOTH sleep better for sure!  Love that part! :D I'm curious if anyone has ever just changed the gaskets only?  I don't expect an answer the OP hasn't even replied to the question on the condition of his exhaust and if it's comparable to the pic of mine, so interest must be down the crapper.  

But you hear people saying to remove them and inspect them, gaskets and scaling inside the channels but never hear of anyone putting the same ones back in with just new gaskets.  Some of the older fellas on older models would take them off, get in there with a custom-made tool and scrape all the rusted scaling in the water jackets and the exhaust channel and re-install them with new gaskets.  I suppose that's a possibility and a huge savings if they're not too thin at that stage.  Something tells me, though, that with that rusty leaking, the gaskets are gone for sure but to cause that, there must be considerable corrosion and scaling in -- at least -- the water jackets.  I'll open a new thread when I do them since this one has ran its course.

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In my 14 years old childhood ??  :haha-7383:    I worked in a AUTO RADIATOR repair shop. WE did rads, heads, marine water everything.  Gaskets can get squished very thin & look like those pictures.

We would clean holes in the moving flow acid tank. Deep rusts went to a machinist & welding place for a perfect  resurfacing job.  Back then NEW was a unused word. Pull the parts apart Clean the rust off & have a crack check done IF the parts look that good. ANY GREAT auto machine shop will do ALL your needs . Marina is going to send your stuff there anyway...Save a couple of thousand.

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On 11/6/2018 at 5:18 AM, Hatem said:

I'm curious if anyone has ever just changed the gaskets only?

Yes. A handful of suggestions follow. Check mating surfaces. They need to be clean of debris, corrosion, etc. This is usually accomplished with a wire brush and emery cloth. If real bad but internal passages are good, they can be re-decked (surface milled; just a skim cut if you will) (about any auto machine shop can do it; small $). Use new bolts and a two or three stage torque regimen in the prescribed alternating pattern. Apply a brush width patch of anti-seize about an quarter inch above max. insertion depth. This keeps water from penetrating deep and freezing the bolt in place. Chase all threads with a tap, then clean all debris out with compressed air or shop vac and snout.

A reminder... I don't know how much leakage you have and only have the static photo to go from. Setting that, the stainless debate and whether I'd reuse as-is aside, Cyclops and you are both on point with disassembly and inspection. It's easy, and if you don't like what you see, you can then move to replacement. No real wasted time or effort, and your mind will be at ease whether used another season or replaced. Best wishes.

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On ‎11‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 6:27 PM, Curt said:

Yes. A handful of suggestions follow. Check mating surfaces. They need to be clean of debris, corrosion, etc. This is usually accomplished with a wire brush and emery cloth. If real bad but internal passages are good, they can be re-decked (surface milled; just a skim cut if you will) (about any auto machine shop can do it; small $). Use new bolts and a two or three stage torque regimen in the prescribed alternating pattern. Apply a brush width patch of anti-seize about an quarter inch above max. insertion depth. This keeps water from penetrating deep and freezing the bolt in place. Chase all threads with a tap, then clean all debris out with compressed air or shop vac and snout.

A reminder... I don't know how much leakage you have and only have the static photo to go from. Setting that, the stainless debate and whether I'd reuse as-is aside, Cyclops and you are both on point with disassembly and inspection. It's easy, and if you don't like what you see, you can then move to replacement. No real wasted time or effort, and your mind will be at ease whether used another season or replaced. Best wishes.

Very cool.  Thanks, Curt.  So a buddy of mine who's been a boat mechanic for a long time was telling me this just yesterday when he came over the house to loan me his engine oil sucking machine so I can change my oil.  He said that once they see the joints leaking a little rusty water like that, the next off-season they'll pull off the risers & manifolds and most of the time, the water jackets have some decent amount of corrosion BUT, overall, they just need to be cleaned & cleared of that corrosion and have much more life left in them after that.

So he said what they do is take both, the manifolds and risers and soak them in muriatic acid for 1 day.  He said the scaling and any corrosion just separates and melts right off.  Then they pull them out and soak them in a mixture of water and baking soda for a day to neutralize the acid.  Then they clean them with acetone and dry them up and reinstall them with new gaskets and they last another 5+ years.  I think that's such a great solution.  Why replace something expensive that literally has twice the lifespan when all it needs is a little "refurbishing", so to speak?  Might just be the way we go.

I'm also leaning towards your logic regarding the stainless steel setup, especially with this newly revealed cleaning method.  Not only cost, but it sounds like these SS systems are louder as well, and I'm really not into that with this boat.  It's already plenty loud enough.

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