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Fishstick

Our Upcoming First Weekend on the Hook

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Hi,

We are finally ready to spend the weekend in a cove. I had time this past weekend to take the ski boat out and scout out some good spots.

Reading through some old threads causes me to ask a few things:

1) my plan was to find a cove (fresh water) where the water was glass, virtually no wind, but after reading some threads, it seems that you want some wind to move the air around when using the genset. Since we will be using the genset, do I need to find an area with a little breeze?

2) is there an optimum, or preferred depth for anchoring? I was thinking the 15' range, but wanted to check as this will be our first time.

Thanks in advance!

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Assume you'll swing 360 degrees around the anchor unless you also deploy a stern anchor.  Make sure you have enough water all the way around that anchor point so you don't swing into a shallow.  Also make sure the shoreline and other boats are clear of that full radius.

Deploy enough scope to get a 7:1 ratio of rode to depth.  For example: you're in 7' of water, and it's 3' from the waterline to your cleat, you'll want to deploy a minimum of 70' of rode (line+chain). 

 

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Id opt for a calm anchoring vs finding wind to park in.  Ensure your equipment is operating properly and you have the proper gas alarms on the boat.  Wouldn't over think it.  Be smart but its not like people are dying in droves sleeping on boats.

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You may not need 7 to 1. Chain is key in making your anchor hold. The more  the better. Also know your bottom 

I will pick on me, i have a 290 with 30 feet of chain.  I am in 25 feer of water and my rode is about 60 to 70 feet with 4 to 6 knot winds and 6" to 1 foot waves. The bottom is mud.  I never had a problem. If i used 7 or 8 feet of chain, the anchor would never hold.

Or even better, if the bottom was sand. I would need about 80 to 100 feet of rode.

Anyways, set your anchor drag alarm!!

 

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Thanks Iggy, 

We will probably be in 15-25' of water and didn't realize I will need to release that much line!

I had a battery issue and it took sometime to correct. When we got it corrected, it has been raining here for almost two weeks straight and haven't had a good weekend yet to go out!!!

The lake level is steadily rising and we expect our walkway to the slip to go under within a week. This happened about 4 years ago on the lake when it flooded really bad and slips moved all around the lake. It was a real mess so we are hoping it doesn't come to that as we were unable to get to our boat for around 6 months due to walkway damage. The marina was hit really hard.

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8 hours ago, Phillbo said:

Where are you located Fishstick?

Lake Texoma, Oklahoma

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We are on the Oklahoma side of the lake, almost furthest north, Little Glasses Marina in Madill, OK, been there for about 25 years.

I will go up this weekend and hoping to be able to get to the boat.

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You may not need a lot of line/rode out. It all depends on chain and botton. Let out what you think you need, than put your boat in reverse. Just drop it in gear at idle. Is the anchor holding you ask your self.

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Seems like every year we arrive at the anchor point for fireworks, or Fleet Week and all the "occasional" boater are out in force. Had a pontoon pull up to me in Baltimore Harbor entrance and drop his anchor at low tide, which had just enough line to hit bottom and little more. Tried to relax and watch the airshow only to see him dragging in my direction. I yell "you anchor is dragging" and he shouts back "you sure it's not yours?" Know you tide state and always anticipate a sudden squall. Here Still Pond is notorious for a single 35 to 40 foot cruiser being the mother ship with two anchors and will raft up 3 or 4 on each side. Sudden afternoon thunderstorm and obvious results. In the summer of 2003, had 60 boats aground, and a woman broke her leg trying to save her new flat screen TV. No such thing as too much anchor rode.  W

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