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summerpenguin

Advice on Battery Charger for winter trickling?

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Once I REALLY finish winterizing my (new to me) boat, I plan to take the two batteries off and keep them inside my basement.

 

I don't have any battery chargers. Any advice on what charger to get to keep my batteries in good shape over the winter?

 

Thanks!

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What type of batteries? A.G.M., flooded and gel.

Gel and AGM don't need to trickle changer provided there stored full charged. They only discharge about 2 to 3% per month.

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35 minutes ago, Iggy said:

What type of batteries? A.G.M., flooded and gel.

Gel and AGM don't need to trickle changer provided there stored full charged. They only discharge about 2 to 3% per month.

Hmmm, I am not sure. I don't have them in front of me. I will take a picture and post the pic or the battery information. Thank you.

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Honestly, a little topping off once or twice during your layup is fine, if they are stored fully charged, they will not need any maintaining. they will survive just fine in a basement. For a small device, I like the CTek chargers. Just dont charge next to a gas hot water heater, etc. 

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Hop over to www.batteryuniversity.com   Click on the......Learn about batteries first...….. Read section B U 404 first for Lead Acid battery.

Then look for your type in the BU 400s section.  Enjoy. 

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I charge mine for 24 hours on a 2 amp charge, them put them in the basement for the winter. In the spring I charge them again the same way, then into the boat. They are just basic Marine starting Batteries.

The last set lasted 11 years, no need to over do it. IMO.

 

 

.

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Failing to keep enough water in a battery kills most batteries in 2  years of a lead acid type.  I have done that more than once. 

make sure your engine starts almost instantly. HOT or COLD...…… Long cranking is the 2 biggest killer in my opinion.

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A small reducing current charger is fine. 10  amps is all that is ever needed in a GOOD RUNNING BOAT.

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Don't place them directly on the concrete floor. A couple short 2x4's are best.

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4 hours ago, Phillbo said:

Don't place them directly on the concrete floor. A couple short 2x4's are best.

Ask The Experts.

Your question is a frequent one. Many people have the impression that when batteries sit on concrete, energy "leaks out" or they are ruined. The short answer is that letting modern batteries sit on concrete does not harm or discharge them in any way.

That is according to Ask The Experts.  Denny.

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How do you know he is really an expert? I guess if it's on the interwebs it's true... 

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47 minutes ago, Was_Wylie_Tunes said:

dont know about his expert status, but he's correct. No worries with a modern battery sitting on a concrete floor. 

Yes, thats old school. I believe it had something to do with what the case was made from. 

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46 minutes ago, Was_Wylie_Tunes said:

dont know about his expert status, but he's correct. No worries with a modern battery sitting on a concrete floor. 

Probably like a lot of things on the net, some guy working out of his garage.

Working in the trade for 50 years, I knew, I was just looking for someone to blame if I was wrong.:)

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3 minutes ago, Iggy said:

Yes, thats old school. I believe it had something to do with what the case was made from. 

Yes, it stated that, in the next paragraph.

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In cars & fork trucks they are placed ON STEEL PLATES.  Never a problem.

Now a battery near the end of it's life and holding a charge ?  Will internally discharge to almost dead in 5 to 7 months

Put it anywhere you want to.

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19 hours ago, Iggy said:

What type of batteries? A.G.M., flooded and gel.

Gel and AGM don't need to trickle changer provided there stored full charged. They only discharge about 2 to 3% per month.

Here is a pic of one of my two batteries. I don't believe they are the kind I can top off, but I could be wrong here (also). I will read the info that Cyclops posted. In the meantime, will I need a charger over the winter? Approximately 5 months in Maryland (4 months, 28 days, 21 hours, 43 minutes... 42...)

ChapBattery.jpg.7cd6a50cc7b15410693246a2256a7939.jpg

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if its pulled and stored in moderate temps with a full charge, then no, you will not need to charge them over the layup. Just recharge them prior to returning to service. Will it hurt to give them a little refresh during the off season? No. 

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2 hours ago, summerpenguin said:

Here is a pic of one of my two batteries. I don't believe they are the kind I can top off, but I could be wrong here (also). I will read the info that Cyclops posted. In the meantime, will I need a charger over the winter? Approximately 5 months in Maryland (4 months, 28 days, 21 hours, 43 minutes... 42...)

ChapBattery.jpg.7cd6a50cc7b15410693246a2256a7939.jpg

 

There a  wet cell battery and also called a flooded battery.  To add Mr. Tunes said and there ARE MANY trains of thought on this.

You could, once a month or every other month, use a trickle charger for 15 to 30 minutes. Just to top them off, use one with an automatic feature. Meaning once the battery is fully charged, it will shut down. NOT keep charging and over charge the battery.   

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On ‎11‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 10:42 AM, summerpenguin said:

Once I REALLY finish winterizing my (new to me) boat, I plan to take the two batteries off and keep them inside my basement.

 

I don't have any battery chargers. Any advice on what charger to get to keep my batteries in good shape over the winter?

 

Thanks!

1998 Signature 240, do you have a charger in the boat and a shorepower connection by any chance?

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1 hour ago, Hatem said:

1998 Signature 240, do you have a charger in the boat and a shorepower connection by any chance?

I take it you did not read his post. He is taking his batteries off the boat.

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5 hours ago, Iggy said:

I take it you did not read his post. He is taking his batteries off the boat.

I did.  He wouldn't have to if he has a charger and shorepower connection is what I was getting at.  All he would have to do is get an adapter for the shorepower chord to plug into a 110 outlet at his house and plug it into his boat.  Just don't know if a 1998 Signature 240 came with all that or there was one installed in his boat by the previous owner, hence why I asked the question.

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I am odd ball about batteries.  I have 5 trickle chargers for all 12 vdc wet lead acid batteries. All are handmade & can be  adjusted to constantly add 50 milliamps of current to fully charged batteries...…….

The 50 milliamps is to eliminate any possibility of lead sulphate.  Also known as lead rust on battery plates. I get 8+ years normally. Battery stays in the boat.  All wires off of 1 post.

There are a couple of different ways to keep your batteries happy.

ALWAYS check the water levels in / under each cell cover. Whatever amount of a lead plate is EVER EXPOSED to the air / dries out ?  Is usually dead FOREVER. So covered battery plates is most important.   Winter storage loss of water is 0 amount.

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On 11/22/2018 at 6:10 PM, Hatem said:

I did.  He wouldn't have to if he has a charger and shorepower connection is what I was getting at.  All he would have to do is get an adapter for the shorepower chord to plug into a 110 outlet at his house and plug it into his boat.  Just don't know if a 1998 Signature 240 came with all that or there was one installed in his boat by the previous owner, hence why I asked the question.

I do have a charger onboard and I have a 30Amp outlet at the dock and the boat came with a cord. I guess I was thinking I would take the batteries off the boat and store them inside because I thought that was the best way to store them over the winter. If it doesn't hurt them to be on the boat on the lift all winter, then I will leave them on and just disconnect one of the posts and reconnect it before I plug in the shore power for an hour once a month.

I guess I am looking for the best way to store my batteries so they will be ready for spring.

 

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