Jump to content
Dozer

Need help replacing coupler to Bravo 3

Recommended Posts

Folks I need some help, it seams this boat just keeps giving me one surprise after another…and not the good ones!

So, I finally got the boat back to Pre-Hurricane Michael condition which has been a real pain, but that will be another topic… this means I still have to work on the Starboard engine like I did on the Port engine.

A week before the storm I took the boat out to test the rebuild of the port engine (thanks to wingnut for all the help) – which went very well, until I lost the ability to engage the starboard outdrive. I was hoping it was just a stretched lower unit shift cable… today I finally got the time to remove the outdrive, it came out without any issue at all.

As soon as I pulled the drive shaft out, I saw a couple of long skinny metal pieces hit the ground, they were thinner than a toothpick and were in between the splines of the drive shaft…my heart sunk as I knew exactly what this was. Got the borescope camera and verified that the splines in the coupler were completely gone. Although I expected to see more metal shavings in there, but only saw another one of those long metal shavings all curled up. not sure where they went

 

So here is the help I need; How hard is it to replace the coupler?

I read that the engine has to come out, but this boat does not have much wiggle room…between the black water tank, the Generator and the other engine, it’s pretty tight.

I was hoping since I plan on having the heads redone on this engine (like the port engine), and I have to remove the manifolds and risers, if it’s possible to reach behind the engine and remove the coupler from the fly wheel without moving the engine?

Thank you for any info and tricks on how to get this done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, The rear housing is removed first, but the dust cover bolts cant be reached with the motor in the boat. then you unbolt the coupler from the flywheel.

You have to atleast raise the motor up far enough to work on it . Coupler failure is from engine /coupler misalignment and thats usually cause by collapsed rear bushings so plan on replacing them too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bt Doctur

I guess the TODO list is just getting bigger.
So here is the plan…please let me know if I need to do anything else in regard to replacing the coupler.
Because I was planning on having the heads machined like I did on the port engine -- I will be removing the heads, exhaust and intake manifolds and risers along with a few other parts, I’m thinking I can lift the remainder of the motor and move it forward enough that hopefully I can remove the flywheel cover and then have access to the coupler, without having to pull it all the way out of the engine bay, otherwise I will have to remove the generator. Do you all think it can be done this way?

 

I initially assumed that it was the stern Drive Shift cable that it was bad, so I went ahead and ordered one. From what I could tell when I removed the outdrive, the cable looked fine. Should I still replace it, or get my money back?

Also, is there a specific brand for the coupler that is preferred? Right now just searching for “Coupler Assembly 8M0098795” – the prices range from 440 to 570 deer

 

Could have the following events caused this failure? – the engines have 300hrs each.
The second time I took this boat out after I purchased it, I had a dock line that was accidentally left on the swim platform fall through and wrapped itself around the dual props, we only went a short distance – maybe 1.5 miles when we noticed it, we had to cut it out because it was wrapped tightly, and the boat ran fine after that…at least I couldn’t tell any difference. But this was about 5 months before the drive failed to engage. Also, I don’t believe the previous owners ever removed the outdrive to check alignment or to lube the splines – when I removed it there was no evidence of ANY grease on the splines. Now the gimble bearing had plenty of grease because there’s a grease nipple on the gimble housing. So, do you think this could have been the cause of the problem?

I will be taking out the Port side outdrive tomorrow to check the splines and make sure that one is not also ready to fail -- fingers crossed, I don't want to pull two engines.

Finally, if anyone has done this before, I could use any tips that will help this process as much as possible.
Thank you very much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might want to look into a standard Alpha type coupler. your not pushing the horsepower to require a bravo coupler. It will do the same job

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A new hull will cure a bit over the first year and that will change the relationship between the transom and keel, which will in turn alter the initial factory engine alignment. That's why it is imperative to pull the drive after the first season, and then every 300 hours afterward. The newer couplers come with an external grease fitting which can be accessed by cranking the engine until the fitting points straight up. On these drives, the spline/coupler gets greased yearly or at something less than 100 hours. On the earlier couplers without the fitting, the drive needs to come off annually. As an owner, if your drives do not have a fitting, then buy an alignment tool so that you can spot check alignment annually. Couplers fail, as do gimbel bearings from miss-alignment so I would figure on replacing the gimbel bearing also. Your U-joints may also have grease fittings too but likely they are the newer sealed units. When you buy your alignment tool also buy the bearing driver plate that slides on the end of it, as it makes installing the new bearing easier.

As far as the coupler goes, the bell housing needs to be removed to access the coupler bolts. Your coupler teeth are aluminum and the splined out drive input shaft is steel so when failures occur the coupler takes the hit. I would highly recommend that you upgrade to the stainless steel splined coupler that is used on big block engines and work boats. Simple bolt up replacement per attached illustration. While you are in there, inspect the ring gear teeth on the flywheel, and as you did on the port engine rebuild the starter. Also if any rust patches are seen on the oil pan, now is the time, along with exhaust flappers. You already know that drill.

As Doc mentioned, the rubber vibration isolation mounts (item #29) can fail which causes the back of the engine to drop a tad. Inspect them carefully and confirm alignment after engine re-installation. The bell housing hangs off of the transom plate, and any failure of those mounts cannot be adjusted around. The only adjustment available to you is the two hull mounted front mounts which are adjusted independently. It's important that the front of the engine is suspended from it's mid-point so that there is no twisting moment induced during alignment. You slowly drop the front of the engine in 1/8" increments until the alignment tool slides effortlessly through the new gimbel bearing and into the entire length of the coupler spline. You then crank the engine over by hand to the 3,6, and 9 o'clock points of rotation, re-checking alignment along the way. Any tight points encountered need to be mediated by splitting the difference between too tight and perfect. Take some time to get it right but the end results are worth the effort. Longevity of replacement parts and smoother operation. I've had friends swear I worked on their engines after an alignment issue was resolved, as in extreme cases it can make a huge difference in drive-ability.

Lastly, we need to talk about grease. A multi-purpose grease is fine for a bearing as the bearing itself is an anti-friction element and the main purpose of the lubricant in those applications is to disperse heat. Splines are a different animal altogether. The spline teeth are know as an extreme pressure application, and require a lube that is rated for EP as they contain heavy metal additives that prevent galling of the mating surfaces during each revolution. A spline has both face loading and sliding moment with each and every turn so the proper lube is essential. A simple multi-purpose  (MP) grease used here will lead to premature failure. The message? Use EP specialty grease in splines, and a high quality MP grease in a bearing as a bearing actually does not like the heavy metal additives as they impede heat transfer.

See Below Drawing, and if it were me I would opt for the older style gimbel bearing that has a grease hole so that you can grease it. The newer ones are seal bearings and I've never been a fan of those as they will fail someday, and a greased gimbel properly aligned will last virtually for ever. Sorry there is no easy way out of this as you have paid your dues, but if you have a friend with a back hoe, reach fork, or can use a simple lumber truss built from scaffolding or even 2x10"s, I would just lift the short block and pull the boat from under it. You lost most of your huge oak trees during the storm, but you did say there was one remaining. Just saying...  Ha.  Build the frame right and then you can assemble the entire engine, painted, pretty, and perfect for re-installation. Plug and play is always better.  W

 

https://www.marinepartsplus.com/catalog/mercruiser/serialize(value)/5.0L_MPI_ALPHA-BRAVO/8M0049000/15322-160

https://www.marinepartsplus.com/catalog/mercruiser/serialize(value)/5.0L_MPI_ALPHA-BRAVO/8M0049000/15322-410

https://www.marinepartsplus.com/catalog/mercruiser/serialize(value)/INTEGRATED_TRANSOM/891749/10270-70

https://www.marinepartsplus.com/catalog/mercruiser/serialize(value)/INTEGRATED_TRANSOM/891749/10270-60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bt Doctur and Wingnut rock.

Dozier, glad to see you back.

Answering the question about cause, since no grease was found, this appears to be the primary cause. Misalignment is likely present to some degree given age, but the drive shaft/outdrive came off and didn’t hang-up. Alignment should be performed nonetheless at reassembly.

Since Dozier’s going to remove heads, intake, etc., two dumb questions about Mercury:

(1) Is there any harm trying to get those lower bolts without removing the engine or is it simply impossible?

(2) I’ve welded a number of sockets to various bars, pipes, flats, etc. to get where my short arms can’t reach. In many cases I’ve added bends, angles, etc. On occasion I’ve also cut various slots, head patterns, etc. into various metal stock and bypassed welding the socket/wrench when clearance is especially tight. Takes time for sure, just wondering if something like this is possible. (Granted, if the site is equipped to pull the motor, that’s probably quicker.)

Thanks in advance guys. Just trying to learn more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/6/2019 at 1:04 AM, Dozer said:

Because I was planning on having the heads machined like I did on the port engine -- I will be removing the heads, exhaust and intake manifolds and risers along with a few other parts, I’m thinking I can lift the remainder of the motor and move it forward enough that hopefully I can remove the flywheel cover and then have access to the coupler, without having to pull it all the way out of the engine bay, otherwise I will have to remove the generator. Do you all think it can be done this way?

Yes, why not?  Work smarter, not harder.  I was just telling another member who had water in his oil on a 5.7 merc and he thought he needed to pull the whole engine out and I told him he didn't to do that since there was really only 3 areas water could've gotten into the engine, carb, head gasket and manifold gasket and all three of those  could easily come off without having to pull the whole engine out.  If you have enough room in front of the bilge to pull the block up and have the access you need to work on the coupler, I'd say that's the easiest and smartest way to do it.

On 1/6/2019 at 1:04 AM, Dozer said:

Could have the following events caused this failure? – the engines have 300hrs each.
The second time I took this boat out after I purchased it, I had a dock line that was accidentally left on the swim platform fall through and wrapped itself around the dual props, we only went a short distance – maybe 1.5 miles when we noticed it, we had to cut it out because it was wrapped tightly, and the boat ran fine after that…at least I couldn’t tell any difference. But this was about 5 months before the drive failed to engage. Also, I don’t believe the previous owners ever removed the outdrive to check alignment or to lube the splines – when I removed it there was no evidence of ANY grease on the splines. Now the gimble bearing had plenty of grease because there’s a grease nipple on the gimble housing. So, do you think this could have been the cause of the problem?

Hard to say, it's possible.  I guess it depends on how the rope ended up wrapping itself around the props and if it was tight enough to prevent them from spinning.  But even so, those props have hubs that are designed specifically for that, should the props get stuck in the ground or sand or rocks, they spin off the hubs as to not damage the shaft, spline, coupler etc.  If the boat ran fine after that, I doubt it was a contributing factor, but you never know.

I had a similar thing happen to me and luckily no damage.  In our area there are thousands of gaddam lobster traps all over the area and it's almost inevitable if you boat a lot in these waters not to miss one of their lines.  Got the boat out of the water and trailered it home and took the props off and cleared the line and everything was fine.  But this is VP.

tV6dLfg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone, thank you for all the replies. I have a few more comments and questions;

2 hours ago, Wingnut said:

The newer couplers come with an external grease fitting which can be accessed by cranking the engine until the fitting points straight up. On these drives, the spline/coupler gets greased yearly or at something less than 100 hours. On the earlier couplers without the fitting, the drive needs to come off annually.

The current drive has the fittings, but with twin engines how to you even see behind the engines to access the fittings. I guess you have to remove the drives...which I don't think the previous owners did.

 

2 hours ago, Wingnut said:

When you buy your alignment tool also buy the bearing driver plate that slides on the end of it, as it makes installing the new bearing easier.

Got any good suggestions, or any will do? 

 

2 hours ago, Wingnut said:

I would highly recommend that you upgrade to the stainless steel splined coupler that is used on big block engines and work boats

Do you happen to have a part number for this upgraded coupler?

2 hours ago, Wingnut said:

As Doc mentioned, the rubber vibration isolation mounts (item #29) can fail which causes the back of the engine to drop a tad. Inspect them carefully and confirm alignment after engine re-installation. 

What do I need to look for when inspecting the rubber mounts?

How do I check to see if the gimbal bearing needs to be replaced, what do I look for?
How often should the Stern Drive shift cable be replaced? I just ordered some but after removing the drive, the current one seams to be in good shape.

As usual, this forum is a life saver, thank you all for your responses and advice.

2 hours ago, Wingnut said:

I would just lift the short block and pull the boat from under it. You lost most of your huge oak trees during the storm, but you did say there was one remaining

Being the starboard engine, I don't think I can lift it all the way out of the engine bay unless I remove  the generator. I was hoping I would have enough room to just lift it off the mounts, slide It against the generator and remove the flywheel housing and replace the coupler while hanging in the engine bay...your thoughts on that? ya, no luck on the oak trees, the ones I could have used are gone. Here is a quick video as the storm was ending -- we're very lucky in our neighborhood, the houses are all pretty much brand new 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Dozer said:

Everyone, thank you for all the replies. I have a few more comments and questions;

The current drive has the fittings, but with twin engines how to you even see behind the engines to access the fittings. I guess you have to remove the drives...which I don't think the previous owners did.

 

Got any good suggestions, or any will do? 

 

Do you happen to have a part number for this upgraded coupler?

What do I need to look for when inspecting the rubber mounts?

How do I check to see if the gimbal bearing needs to be replaced, what do I look for?
How often should the Stern Drive shift cable be replaced? I just ordered some but after removing the drive, the current one seams to be in good shape.

As usual, this forum is a life saver, thank you all for your responses and advice.

Being the starboard engine, I don't think I can lift it all the way out of the engine bay unless I remove  the generator. I was hoping I would have enough room to just lift it off the mounts, slide It against the generator and remove the flywheel housing and replace the coupler while hanging in the engine bay...your thoughts on that? ya, no luck on the oak trees, the ones I could have used are gone. Here is a quick video as the storm was ending -- we're very lucky in our neighborhood, the houses are all pretty much brand new 

 

Any new generation Merc alignment tool will work and the bearing installer plate slips on the end. Amazon, E-Bay. Just buy the best deal.   Pulling the gennerator is pretty easy once you have an overhead rigged.  The HD coupler is shown  as an option on the attachment I sent before.  To grease the couplers one typically needs to lay face down across the engine. If the rubber in the mount is soft or can be deflected by hand, replace it.  The gimbel bearing is a 40$ unit that had been abused due to the couple failure.  Replace it.  W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Wingnut said:

The HD coupler is shown  as an option on the attachment I sent before.

You mean the cheaper one??? #20 on the chart
https://www.marinepartsplus.com/catalog/mercruiser/serialize(value)/5.0L_MPI_ALPHA-BRAVO/8M0049000/15322-160

5 hours ago, Wingnut said:

To grease the couplers one typically needs to lay face down across the engine

on my boat unless you're a skinny 5 year old...LOL The air intake cover is about 6 inches from the top of the engine bay and the risers are less than 2 inches... No way to get in there.

5 hours ago, Wingnut said:

The gimbel bearing is a 40$ unit that had been abused due to the couple failure.  Replace it.

Will do, is there a specific tool to pull it out or can I just borrow a bearing puller from the local auto store?

On the positive side, I took the Port side outdrive out today and all looks good in there, the splines were dry, not a bit of grease in sight... except on the gimber bearing, which has plenty.

As for the grease to use on the splines, can I use the same as I use on the prop shaft?
Last question, (for now) when I pulled the outdrives, there was this whitish paste like grease between the drive and the bell housing - is that just grease or some other material? Should I use the same type of material once I put it back together?

Again, thanks for all the guidance...This is going to be a big one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The grease Merc uses is their Quicksilver Engine Coupler Spline Grease 92-802869A. As you can see from their table below, that is the only place this specialty lube is recommended as the application is very specific. All this information is detailed in the Bravo manual #28. 

Lubricants / Sealants / Adhesives
Description Part Number Quicksilver 4-Cycle 25W-40 Marine Engine Oil 92-802837A1      SAE 20W, 30W Or 40W Engine Oil Obtain Locally       Quicksilver High Performance Gear Lube 92-802854A1       Extended Life Ethylene Glycol Antifreeze Obtain Locally          Quicksilver Special Lubricant 101 92-13872A1     Quicksilver Engine Coupler Spline Grease 92-802869A1 Quicksilver Corrosion Guard Spray 92-802878 55        Quicksilver 2-4-C Marine Lubricant With Teflon 92-825407A3      Quicksilver U-Joint and Gimbal Bearing Grease 92-828052A2 Quicksilver Power Trim And Steering Fluid 92-802880A1      Exxon Unirex EP 2 Grease Obtain Locally
Quicksilver Hydraulic Fluid 64-826485A1        Texaco H015 92-862014A1        SeaStar Hydraulic Fluid HA5430 Approved Hydraulic       Chevron Aviation Fluid A Steering Fluids    Mobil Aero HFA Obtain Locally         Shell Aero 4 Fluid meeting MIL Specification H5606C

The coupler is the HD work boat, big block optional coupler part number...              861523A11  COUPLER ASSEMBLY,   Engine OPT Bravo,    Steel Hub for Work Application

The white-ish paste between the mating surfaces of the drive and gimbel housing I can only guess as to what it may be. Could be a spray grease a dealer used to resist corrosion but who knows. I use spray adhesive on the drive side of the o-rings just before putting them into position to keep them in place, and when they are affixed to the drive, I spray the face with silicone to assure they come off with the drive next time it gets pulled.

You mentioned that the splines were dry on the port engine. Do your bore scope inspection on the soft aluminum coupler there too as if that coupler is on it's way out, now is the time. In for a penny, in for a pound. Hey, somebody had to say it. Below is a link to E-Bay for a puller, installer, alignment kit that I think is very reasonable. Once the old bearing is pulled there is a seal in the cavity that is designed to limit sea water intrusion into the bilge spaces in the event of a bellows failure which would allow water to enter the bearing cavity. Having the right tools makes installation a bunch easier. I inspect that seal but I don't routinely replace them unless they show signs of failure, as they are a pain. The other trick while installing the new bearing is keeping the outer retention ring in place while you are driving the new bearing into the pocket. First, slide the alignment tool with driver ring into the old bearing and mark the installed depth on to the alignment tool shaft at some reference point. This way you will know when the new bearing is installed to the proper depth. Secondly, position both the bearing grease hole and the gap in the retention ring properly on the alignment tool shaft and put a reference mark on the outer face of the bearing race. Put another mark on the gimbel housing receiver cavity which corresponds to the grease hole so that when you begin to drive in the bearing, you can align the grease port and bearing hole properly. Once the bearing lands hard into the cavity, attach your grease gun to the zirk fitting and pump up the bearing to visually assure that grease gets to the new races and balls.

Another trick to keep the outer ring in place is to compress it into it's cavity on the new bearing by hand, then wrap the OD tightly with multiple layers of Teflon tape. As you drive the bearing into position, the tape gets pushed out of the way harmlessly, until it is pushed off, and sits in the bottom of the bellows, where it can be grabbed easily and discarded.  W

https://www.ebay.com/i/183548294319?chn=ps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/6/2019 at 8:13 AM, Hatem said:

 

Hard to say, it's possible.  I guess it depends on how the rope ended up wrapping itself around the props and if it was tight enough to prevent them from spinning.  But even so, those props have hubs that are designed specifically for that, should the props get stuck in the ground or sand or rocks, they spin off the hubs as to not damage the shaft, spline, coupler etc. 

Not true on a Bravo 3. The hubs are solid. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something that’s helpful when installing the gimbal bearing and almost all bearings into a housing, put it in the freezer for a day or two. To keep condensation away, make sure it’s dry and don’t wrap in plastic or put it into a bag. Liquid nitrogen also works and is much faster, but improper handling can burn your skin and/or snap the bearing. Once removed from the freezer, drive it home. Takes a lot less effort, but get everything ready before taking it out. Time is not on your side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Phillbo said:

Not true on a Bravo 3. The hubs are solid. 

Bravo 3 duo props don't have the spinoff hubs? That's dissapointing.  Sheesh, kinda supports my theory about Mercury even more.

1 hour ago, Curt said:

Something that’s helpful when installing the gimbal bearing and almost all bearings into a housing, put it in the freezer for a day or two. To keep condensation away, make sure it’s dry and don’t wrap in plastic or put it into a bag. Liquid nitrogen also works and is much faster, but improper handling can burn your skin and/or snap the bearing. Once removed from the freezer, drive it home. Takes a lot less effort, but get everything ready before taking it out. Time is not on your side.

You can get your hands on liquid nitrogen?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liquid nitrogen is readily available. Airgas, Praxair, etc. all have it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Wingnut said:

The coupler is the HD work boat, big block optional coupler part number...              861523A11  COUPLER ASSEMBLY,   Engine OPT Bravo,    Steel Hub for Work Application

W.
When looking at the photos for the HD coupler compared to the one I have in the boat - they are different, Looks like the HD has longer splines.
Should I just stick to the original in case the HD would not fit?
Here are the image links for both;
HD Coupler   https://www.marineengine.com/newparts/part_details.php?pnum=MER861523A11
Original Coupler https://www.marineengine.com/newparts/part_details.php?pnum=MER8M0098795

Thanks for the other info, currently trying to order all the necessary parts to get this going along with rebuilding the engine.. at least the weather is cool and I will not be sweating my you know what in the engine bay  :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dozer said:

W.
When looking at the photos for the HD coupler compared to the one I have in the boat - they are different, Looks like the HD has longer splines.
Should I just stick to the original in case the HD would not fit?
Here are the image links for both;
HD Coupler   https://www.marineengine.com/newparts/part_details.php?pnum=MER861523A11
Original Coupler https://www.marineengine.com/newparts/part_details.php?pnum=MER8M0098795

Thanks for the other info, currently trying to order all the necessary parts to get this going along with rebuilding the engine.. at least the weather is cool and I will not be sweating my you know what in the engine bay  :) 

The representation from your parts supplier depicts but one of the models used on these engines. You must order your replacement via serial number from your engine to ensure proper fit and you will have the choice between the standard and the HD options. As I said, you had a failure and I never go back with the aluminum couplers as the HD version properly greased and kept in alignment will last forever. All you are trying to do is push the failure to the next weakest link which is the cone clutch in your case. If you do run aground something has to give, and a little momentary clutch slippage can be recovered from if you are fast enough on the go stick. A coupler is one and done.  W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Curt said:

Liquid nitrogen is readily available. Airgas, Praxair, etc. all have it.

 Always thought that was a highly regulated chemical since it's extremely dangerous stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 12:42 PM, Wingnut said:

You must order your replacement via serial number from your engine to ensure proper fit and you will have the choice between the standard and the HD options.

Hope this deal I got is NOT one of those "too good" deals; a seller on eBay had a brand new HD coupler that fits my engine. They were asking 575 deer for it with option to make an offer, so I figured I would low ball it at 450, thinking they would either say no or counter offer around 500...but I was surprised to receive a YES. With shipping I got it for under 500 deer. Most prices on eBay and other sites listed the same coupler around 600-800.  So, is there anything I should be on the look out before installing this coupler?  I definitely need something to go my way, it seams this boat just loves to stick it to my bank account.  :)  Thanks

Another question, I initially assumed the reason the starboard was not going into gear was due to a faulty outdrive shift cable, but the cables on both drives seem to in good shape. I ordered some at about 140 deer each and was wondering if I need to replace them? I was thinking of just returning it and using the "mula" for something else. Your thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not impossible to change later, just easier now.  If they look good then take the chance.  On the coupler, make sure the female spline is stainless and that there are no bolt head indentations on the mounting flange indication used.  Otherwise, good deal. Slip you drive input shaft into the new coupling to check for free yet snug fit.  W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/7/2019 at 12:52 PM, Curt said:

Liquid nitrogen is readily available. Airgas, Praxair, etc. all have it.

Dry ice works too.   W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sure does. Can be easier to find in some areas. Same cautions though. Typically, when the bearing is chilled it drops right in and the drift is used to ensure it’s fully seated. Align, tap, tap, done. Don’t try to grease it when still cold though. The pressure tends to move ‘em.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you delete a post?

I started posting a question about a gimbal bearing but figured out the answer right after I posted the question....So how do I get rid of this post?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×