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Tuglife

Spectrum gelcoat patch can it be rolled on?

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When i bought my boat the bow had some mashed up gelcoat as shown in picture. So i used the spectrum kit and it worked pretty well except one problem. As i was sanding down in a couple areas i sanded a bit too much. Not enough to get to the fiberglass but just enough so that you can see some of the color of the fiberglass so it looks like i have these riddish little strips in a couple spots.

So i grabbed my dremel and etched out those spots and applied more gelcoat and got to sanding again and the sane thing happens in other areas. Ive tried 3 times and just as i have sanded to make everything smoothe i always go a ting bit too far. I am chasing my tail at this point. I am sanding with the utmost care using a sanding block by hand starting with 220 then moving to higher grits. It doesnt matter how i do it i always eventually start making some of that red fiberglass color show through. The original damaga and me etching out the cracks has resulted in to much of tye original gelcoat to be removed i guess.

All i need to do i think really is just brush or roll on the gelcoat and just put a super thin layer or two on it so i dont have to see those faint red marks and i would be happy. The question is has anyone ever tried brushing or using a high density foam roller to just apply a coat of this stuff to a small area? 

The pic below is the before picture. You can see it kind of a tricky area. Unfortunately i dont have the after pic to show the red marks but in sure you can imagine.

Thanks in advance!

8DB6D75B-CA48-424D-B27B-E46526F09494.jpeg

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Corners are difficult - rough sand prior to application, apply and overlap an entire area, cover w/ Mylar and use a roller to push the gelcoat into the voids and obtain a "rough" smoothness.  let it dry.  you mentioned starting w/ 220 grit and moving up.  hopefully you are wet sanding - sounds like you are pushing too hard,  this is a process that requires patience, once a dull finish exists and there is a ever so slight raised area, switch to a polishing compound and or the highest grit you can find 1000 grit or higher, continue to wet sand with almost no pressure at all.  

it is hard enough on a flat surface, you have a tough corner - patience  once you start to see even a slight shine, i switch to a wool pad and a power buffer to finish it

Image result for wax on wax off

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17 hours ago, Tuglife said:

So i grabbed my dremel and etched out those spots and applied more gelcoat and got to sanding again and the sane thing happens in other areas. Ive tried 3 times and just as i have sanded to make everything smoothe i always go a ting bit too far. I am chasing my tail at this point. I am sanding with the utmost care using a sanding block by hand starting with 220 then moving to higher grits. It doesnt matter how i do it i always eventually start making some of that red fiberglass color show through. The original damaga and me etching out the cracks has resulted in to much of tye original gelcoat to be removed i guess.

All i need to do i think really is just brush or roll on the gelcoat and just put a super thin layer or two on it so i dont have to see those faint red marks and i would be happy. The question is has anyone ever tried brushing or using a high density foam roller to just apply a coat of this stuff to a small area?

So a couple of things to add to Delaney's post, why did you use the dremel to etch out anything?  That was probably not needed because the factory gelcoat application is very thin to begin with and you don't want to see any fiberglass.  A dremel tool -- even if you use it lightly -- will take out that thin gelcoat rapidly and you really don't want to do that because then you actually need to build more thickness with either several coats of gelcoat or start with a fairing compound and then gelcoat.  So since you started seeing the red of the fiberglass come through, you're gonna need to apply several coats on that spot to build it up.

Really the best way to fix that spot is to sand it dry by hand very lightly with 320 grit sandpaper.  2 or 3 passes only just to scuff it up enough for the new gelcoat to stick.  Sand a little bit into the finish gelcoat so that you can feather the new stuff into it and it will stick.  Then just use a small, throw-away brush and apply a medium layer of new gelcoat.  Let it dry and lightly sand that again with 320 (just to develop some tooth) and apply another coat with a new brush.  Do at least 3 coats and feather over and into the finish gelcoat so that it blends nicely.  Be patient.  Once you have enough buildup of gelcoat, and it's completely dry, start the wet sanding process.  Very light pressure and even put a little soap in your water mix because you really don't need too much sanding.  Very lightly in small circles and keep it wet.  Clean the paint off the sandpaper as you work it.  Move to 800 grit then 1000 or even 1500 and then wipe it clean and dry and then follow the buffing instructions above and it should come out perfect.  Just be patient and put enough layers on so when you sand, you bring it down to where it's needed and not to the fiberglass.

Don't use a roller.  All the gelcoat that is available is actually engineered for large application by spray.  The makeup of gelcoat is designed specifically for commercial use and so when you buy these repair kits or small amounts, it's the same engineered gelcoat for spraying large surfaces.  So it's not made to be absorbed by a roller nap but it can be brushed on, but then it needs to be lightly sanded and buffed.

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I used the dremel because just about every youtube video i watched recommended it. Oops. Lol. I hope using a brush will work ok i am skeptical because the spectrum paste is like a vaseline rather than a paint. Hope i can some how apply it somewhat evenly.

Thanks guys for the advice! 

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22 hours ago, Tuglife said:

I used the dremel because just about every youtube video i watched recommended it. Oops. Lol. I hope using a brush will work ok i am skeptical because the spectrum paste is like a vaseline rather than a paint. Hope i can some how apply it somewhat evenly.

Thanks guys for the advice! 

It sounds as if you have gelcoat paste, a gelcoat filler that is use to treat gouges, scratches, and minor chips.  Hatem is referring to the application of gelcoat on a larger surface area requiring a different preparation treatment than scratches.  You may need to fill with filler (regular filler) first as Hatem is suggesting, sand, and then spray the matched spectrum gelcoat.  Spectrum has different gelcoat types, use the right type for your application.  

Practice on piece of wood first to get an idea of how things work

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Buy their spran can gel for top coat, then just compound to get the perfect shine.   W

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On ‎2‎/‎28‎/‎2019 at 10:05 AM, Tuglife said:

I used the dremel because just about every youtube video i watched recommended it. Oops. Lol. I hope using a brush will work ok i am skeptical because the spectrum paste is like a vaseline rather than a paint. Hope i can some how apply it somewhat evenly.

Thanks guys for the advice! 

I see.  When you said "I grabbed the dremel and etched out those spots," that's usually a technique that removes quite a bit of material, which is why I was questioning why you used it.  Typically that process is necessary if you have deep gouges with flaking material around it like from an impact or a hard hit against something.  Then using the dremel to etch out a groove is necessary to open and clean out the damage for new material to stick but that also means that now you're really deep into the surface.  In that case you need filler material first although there is a way to do it with several layers of gelcoat and that paste in the Spectrum kit but that gets tricky in order to do it right and get excellent results.  By looking at that pic, you probably only needed to sand that scuffed up area by hand and then follow the steps I outlined for you.

On ‎2‎/‎28‎/‎2019 at 10:05 AM, Tuglife said:

I used the dremel because just about every youtube video i watched recommended it. Oops. Lol. I hope using a brush will work ok i am skeptical because the spectrum paste is like a vaseline rather than a paint. Hope i can some how apply it somewhat evenly.

Thanks guys for the advice! 

IIRC that spectrum kit has a paste-like goo that you mix the gelcoat paint with and apply with a putty knife of some sort.  That's for deeper gouges and gashes so you might not have the correct stuff to use with a brush like Tidal mentioned.  If it's not deep where you need to build up material, then just use the gelcoat paint itself without the paste and brush on several layers sanding in between until you have enough coverage to just buff out that final coat.

The reason you must sand in between layers is because almost all the gelcoats come with a built-in wax.  That's usually for a one layer application and then buff so the wax brings out the shine.  But in your case, you might need to do several coats which is why you need to sand in between to temper that wax for the next layer to bond.  Otherwise each layer won't bond correctly. 

If it's not too deep, use only the gelcoat paint and don't mix it with the paste.  If it's too deep from the dremel, use the paste and spread it with a putty knife (much harder to do) and then sand down your final layer and brush on straight gelcoat and feather in and blend the final coat then buff.

That kit also comes with some plastic sheets.  You putty on the paste, cover it with that plastic sheet and let it dry.  Then remove the plastic and you have a really smooth surface.  But that is really tricky to do and blend in to existing areas. 

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The spectrum kit only has two ingredients. The vaseline like paste and the hardening agent. Also it will really help if i showed a picture of what it currently looks like. Unfortunately i cant do that until the shrink wrap comes off in a few weeks.

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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 7:17 AM, Tuglife said:

The spectrum kit only has two ingredients. The vaseline like paste and the hardening agent.

That sucks.  So the pasty gelcoat is already the right color match?  That's why I thought you were using a similar kit to the West Marine one which comes with a that paste and white and black and yellow I believe (or you can buy other colors depending on what you need) and mix the paint with the paste, add the appropriate hardener and apply.  When I used it on my boat, I puttied in on with a plastic putty knife and feathered it off really nicely onto the finish surroundings and then used the plastic sheet that also comes with the kit and laid it on top for a super flat and smooth finish.  Worked out perfectly.  My next gouge when it does happen I will use a totally different technique that I've learned recently but check this guy out using the West Marine repair kit.  This guy has no skills whatsoever yet look how well it came out, considering he didn't event try matching the white color.

 

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