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Water Dawg 6

Sea Story To Share

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My family loves to go to deep sea fishing here in the North Carolina Outer Banks.  One day last summer, I checked the sea conditions and it stated the waves will be 2-4 feet with 8 second intervals.  That is usually an acceptable range for my 290 Signature and sea conditions any bigger my 5 year old will start turning green on me.  So as we started to head out the inlet, I glanced in the far distance and was able to see white caps for as far as my eyes could see.  Knowing the sea conditions, I thought this to be odd because the waves would have had to be much greater than four feet to be visable from this far away.  The inlet is usually pretty rough but once you get past the breakers it usually flattens out to the stated NOAA sea conditions.  NOT on this day!  As I continued to proceed the waves gotten bigger, faster and more violent to say the least.  I was having 7-10 foot swells coming over the bow.  The waves weren't just coming straight forward from the East either, there were some coming from the side (South).  I knew we couldn't continue but at the same time I knew that attempting to turn the boat around and risk a 10 foot swell coming over the side of the boat would sink and/or roll us for sure.  But we had no choice.....So I got my composure and starting counting the seconds between each swell and noticed somewhat of a pattern.  I decided when the pattern was due to be around 6 seconds, I would hit the throttles as hard as I could and flip her around.  As she came around a rolling wave went under the boat and lifted the rear of the boat basically out of the water high enough to where my props were not under the water, so immediately lost power and was at the mercy of the swell.  Luckily, the swell continued to turn the boat back inland and I was able to pick up speed and get out of the inlet.  My kids and wife were all soaking wet and shaking like leaves.  Lessons learned that day for sure and the Outer Banks and an inlets are very unforgiving...I found out quickly why it is named the Grave Yard of the Atlantic.  But guess what?  The bite is on and we're heading out this weekend!! 

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I tense when the prop races for a couple of seconds in the air.  I rethink the whole Idea of being out. By the time the prop reenters the water.

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Been there, done that and its no fun. Totally know what you went through. And the passengers are  flipping out!

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Pitch poling is no fun that's for sure.  Yep my wife and kids were totally flipping out even though they couldn't see with all the salt water in their faces.

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I did bury the 186 to within 4 " of the windshield top frame. Bow cover held all the water out. Seemed like forever before I said anything to the wife.

I now do not go towards any fast moving freighters while in less than 50' 0f water.

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Similar story in my H2O first time I took it out into open water, though I’m only 21’ open bow.  Definitely wouldn’t take it out again if I see white cap anything. 

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That’s scary stuff, especially with kids on board :wacko:

A couple years ago on LOTO I was leaving a restaurant at a very busy part of the lake.  As I was leaving I was being very cautious as there was a 40’ Sundancer plowing thru directly between me and where I needed to get. Just as the wake was about to hit the bow I was setup to take it at a 45 and then get the #$^% out of dodge, when a 30’ Baja came flying about 60+ mph and jumped the cruisers wake literally 10 ft in front of us. I’m guessing he never saw our little boat and we were lucky there wasn’t a collision.  Well long story short, the Baja wake was at the perfect distance behind the other that when my bow dipped from the cruiser wake it plowed right into the second one and let’s just say I was lucky we weren’t swimming to shore.

 I had some friends still at the dock that saw it happen and said my entire boat disappeared after the impact, and thought they were gonna be retrieving us from the water.

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Boats are just like a car without wheels.

 

Said the marina salesman.             :haha-7383:

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2 hours ago, cyclops2 said:

Boats are just like a car without wheels.

 

Said the marina salesman.             :haha-7383:

That would explain the only reason bowriders come with docking lights!

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Whew. Glad all worked out.  What is the saying?  "A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor"  Every once in a while I get into a situation that pushes my skills.  Fortunately nothing serious.    

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Every time is a new adventure and new things learned that's for sure.  I stay away from the busy coves and islands that are famous for party goers around here as most are young, don't know the first thing about boating, boat safety and most have been drinking making them even more stupid.  Haven't been on a lake as a Captain before, but I would expect there are a bunch of ignorant boaters out there who do not pay attention to what they're doing.  Boating is fun, but safety is paramount if you want to boat another day.  I witnessed a 40 foot donzi speed boat fly past another boat going about 60.  Problem was that he went to left of the other boat, right where the shoal was.  His motors where riped right off the boat and flipped twice landing back perfectly.  The people where ok, but knowing having local knowledge of waterways is very important, as nautical charts often do not show the shoaling in this area. Specially the shoaling caused by midnight dredging of the ICW.

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