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Tidal behavior at an inlet

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I was looking at the video here of Haulover inlet in Florida.  Very interesting to watch. There were two boats that were underpowered to handle the speed of the tidal flow. One was almost swept out to sea.  So I wonder....

A] What speeds can an inlet obtain?

B] Once the tidal flow is finished going in or out, does the flow come to a stop and if so, how long before the flow begins to reverse itself?

 

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This is my inlet.

Irt can get very sloppy but it is a short run.

Most of the problems are caused by the large yachts going in and out.

Coming in it gets real shallow real fast, you need to plan in advance or go aground especially at low tide.

If it is real bad ft lauderdale and gov cut are ten miles away.

I prefer the tides pushing me.

At slack tide, the tide is still.

 

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Tides come in and out twice a day but the water (current) is always moving.  The main reason when you should be concerned about the tide (like Jeff said) is when the water is shallow.  Then you obviously want to attack the inlet at high tide.  When the water is shallow and you're at low tide breakers are more prevalent and very dangerous.  Navigating any inlet is probably the most stressful and dangerous part of any boating trip I think.  Here in the outter banks of North Carolina more boats and ships get sunk here in the inlets more than any other place in the world.  I always watch what other boats are coming in an out and what paths they take.  If you see a larger boat turn around, that's usually your sign to do the same. 

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14 hours ago, jeffk said:

This is my inlet.

Irt can get very sloppy but it is a short run.

Most of the problems are caused by the large yachts going in and out.

Coming in it gets real shallow real fast, you need to plan in advance or go aground especially at low tide.

If it is real bad ft lauderdale and gov cut are ten miles away.

I prefer the tides pushing me.

At slack tide, the tide is still.

Did you hear about the husband and wife who hit the jetty at Government Cut and died?  This happened last week if I'm not mistaken and they leave behind a 17 year old boy that the news station went to interview the next morning which created a whole other issue.  But they were celebrating the mother's birthday and coming in at night and didn't see the north jetty which juts out further than the south one and slammed into it.  Both died and I think the friend that was with them was rescued and is in the hospital.  It was big news in Miami.

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18 hours ago, SST said:

I was looking at the video here of Haulover inlet in Florida.  Very interesting to watch. There were two boats that were underpowered to handle the speed of the tidal flow. One was almost swept out to sea.  So I wonder....

A] What speeds can an inlet obtain?

B] Once the tidal flow is finished going in or out, does the flow come to a stop and if so, how long before the flow begins to reverse itself

Here's today's tidal chart for Haulover.  So to answer at least your second question, it's fluid from one tidal direction to the other.  It doesn't stop at all.  The second it's done coming in, it starts going out and vice-versa.  Pretty much the same way around here.

Local time: 2019-04-30 Tue 8:01 AM EDT

PNG graph: Bakers Haulover Inlet (inside), Florida

<p><p><img class="predictions-plot" alt="PNG graph: Bakers Haulover Inlet (inside), Florida" src="/graphs/422.png\" width=960 height=312></p>

51tLEdnHexL._AC_SL170_.jpg
 

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I like ridding the back side of any wave while in forward gear.  I never ran the narrow OLD inlets of N J at near maximum wave height.  TOO EASY to shove the bow under the base of a wave.  As several boats almost did.  Lots of  lucky people in that video clip.

 

Oh well

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From the movie, it looks like there was a storm off shore due to the size of the waves. Also, I don't know the area but I would think only headway speed would be allowed. It looks like a canal of some sort. Also, some boaters were not looking at the marine weather for wave size.

You really don't want to look at the tides, but the current speeds. What I mean is, I have gone through the Cape Cod Canal and Woods Hole. The waves going though the canal are generally around one footers. But the currents can reach 6 to 7 knots in ether direction.   Woods Hole the waves are bigger but the same currents. 

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Talk about a offshore storm blowing straight in line with the inlet ???

I saw 10 to 20 foot standing waves.  With foolish cruisers rolling their boats.  Several a day. Is there that much booze on a cruiser ? In the 19 50s.  I just stood on the jetty wall for hours watching the nuts.

Each weekend storm day we watched with little emotion as they rolled their boats.

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