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EliW

Bottom Paint Questions

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16 minutes ago, Water Dawg 6 said:

RJ, I have Bravo III outdrives and my prop anodes alone cost me 50+.  I use boat zincs to buy the kits, but the prop anode that comes in the kit doesn't fit my prop, so I always have to buy them at West Marine.  Two years??? I get a month and half if I'm lucky.  It's not my boat as I have a Mercathoid system and a Galvonic Isolator.  I did find once though that my neighbor was using a non-marine battery charger next to me.  But other than that don't know why the electrolysis is so bad here.  I've switched to three different Marinas in the area and they're all the same and my neighbors have all burned through them as well.  Salt water is definitely different than fresh when it comes to bottom growth (specifically with the muscles and barnacles).  If you don't have a diver here your boat isn't leaving the dock cause you'll never get on plane that's for sure.  I can share with you the link to the YouTube channel my diver has which shows the before and after videos of the cleaning under my boat and what it looks like in just one month.  It's crazy!

A month and a half?! You have a serious issue that should be addressed.

I would get the hanging electrode and connect that to your battery negative terminal and hang it overboard while at the slip. Maybe run a 4 AWG black wire from the negative to a terminal post somewhere accessible to connect easily when you come and go.

Then I would invest in the corrosion reference electrode and get to work figuring out where the stray current is coming from. It takes some effort, but this is something you should address.

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Been dealing with it for three years now.  The hanging electrode seems like a good idea, I'll give that a shot.  Still playing exhaust manifold games, but after that I'll look deeper into the electrolysis issue.  It's already in the 80's down here, time to get out fishing.

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On 5/9/2019 at 7:47 AM, sburke91 said:

I think the big question is, why is speed very important to you?  If speed is that important, you probably should have made another boat choice.  A 19' H20's a great boot, but it's not what one would consider a speedy boat.  

Money....  primarily I'm also new to boating and thought this would be a good boa

 

On 5/8/2019 at 10:31 PM, Iggy said:

I found that this paint works the best on the out-drives. I tried the spray on, but this will give you a better coat and its glossy.  https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?path=-1|2200442|2200447|2200453&id=2108143

thanks so much, ill look into this.

 

On 5/8/2019 at 11:17 AM, TexasPilot71 said:

Remember, I'm not comparing unpainted to painted.  Just saying that my experience with a painted hull was such that if you let the paint "go" it can eventually erode your speed considerably.

oh... I understand now

 

Thanks so much guys, if anyone has an opinion about hard and soft paints (which one is better having to sand or not) and which ones you use let me know!

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1 hour ago, EliW said:

Thanks so much guys, if anyone has an opinion about hard and soft paints (which one is better having to sand or not) and which ones you use let me know!

If you're trying to get every last MPH out of it, something like VC-17M will do that. You can even burnish it for an even smoother surface. However, it can't be left out of the water or it will require a scuff sand to reactivate. And every so many years you'll have to have it soda blasted off because it doesn't wear away so each time you touch up the paint you just add more and it gets too thick eventually.

If you want the least maintenance and be able to trailer it without scuff sanding, I would use a soft ablative. There are many choices of soft ablatives and some are better than others. Some also work better in freshwater than saltwater or warm water vs colder water. Where will you be boating?

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10 hours ago, EliW said:

Money....  primarily I'm also new to boating and thought this would be a good boa

 

thanks so much, ill look into this.

 

oh... I understand now

 

Thanks so much guys, if anyone has an opinion about hard and soft paints (which one is better having to sand or not) and which ones you use let me know!

As I mentioned, ablative (soft) paint.  But thats me?

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15 hours ago, Iggy said:

As I mentioned, ablative (soft) paint.  But thats me?

I agree with Iggy. For that boat, go ablative. The extra work required for a hard paint is not worth it for your use case. 

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You people that are going thru Zincs so fast ?   

Get the Power & Light company to check for a UNDERWATER CABLE that is causing the powerful eating up of your anodes. There is also a possibility that a severe shock may exist.

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Will not slow you down, I put it on the bottom of my girl in 1992, and the original is still on, of course I trailer. 

When I put it on they advertized that it would make the bottom slipperier.  Denny

Interlux VC 17M Extra with Biolux

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On 5/10/2019 at 10:53 AM, rjbergen said:

If you're trying to get every last MPH out of it, something like VC-17M will do that. You can even burnish it for an even smoother surface. However, it can't be left out of the water or it will require a scuff sand to reactivate. And every so many years you'll have to have it soda blasted off because it doesn't wear away so each time you touch up the paint you just add more and it gets too thick eventually.

If you want the least maintenance and be able to trailer it without scuff sanding, I would use a soft ablative. There are many choices of soft ablatives and some are better than others. Some also work better in freshwater than saltwater or warm water vs colder water. Where will you be boating?

In Annapolis Maryland on the Severn.

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On 5/11/2019 at 11:35 AM, rjbergen said:

I agree with Iggy. For that boat, go ablative. The extra work required for a hard paint is not worth it for your use case. 

We would hire someone to do it for us. Does soda blasting hurt the boat?

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One more thing if i want to switch from hard to soft or soft to hard can i if i remove the old paint or double layer a soft and hard so when the soft goes the hard shows? Just wondering.

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On 5/9/2019 at 2:12 PM, Water Dawg 6 said:

RJ, I have Bravo III outdrives and my prop anodes alone cost me 50+.  I use boat zincs to buy the kits, but the prop anode that comes in the kit doesn't fit my prop, so I always have to buy them at West Marine.  Two years??? I get a month and half if I'm lucky.  It's not my boat as I have a Mercathoid system and a Galvonic Isolator.  I did find once though that my neighbor was using a non-marine battery charger next to me.  But other than that don't know why the electrolysis is so bad here.  I've switched to three different Marinas in the area and they're all the same and my neighbors have all burned through them as well.  Salt water is definitely different than fresh when it comes to bottom growth (specifically with the muscles and barnacles).  If you don't have a diver here your boat isn't leaving the dock cause you'll never get on plane that's for sure.  I can share with you the link to the YouTube channel my diver has which shows the before and after videos of the cleaning under my boat and what it looks like in just one month.  It's crazy!

Regarding anode life, while I know almost zero about saltwater boating, 1.5 months seems ridiculously short. I’m sure you’ve checked, but you’re being supplied with the correct ones, zinc, right?

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1 hour ago, EliW said:

We would hire someone to do it for us. Does soda blasting hurt the boat?

No it doesn’t hurt the boat, but it costs money. Back in 2014 when I had my last boat done, it was $3.50 per sq ft for soda blasting, and $2.50 per sq ft for 2 coats of paint. An epoxy barrier coat could be applied for an extra $2.50 per sq ft, but should not be needed in your case with a new boat. Square footage was determine as length time beam. Add $150 for paint. So say 23 ft x 8 ft beam for 184 sq ft, or about $460 to paint.

A soft paint will get 3 - 5 years prior to repainting. With soft paint I recommend the 2 coats be different colors so you can monitor wear.

A hard paint could go longer. 

Keep in mind that VC-17M loses its anti-fouling properties after more than a day or two out of the water. It requires a scuff sand to reactivate. 

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1 hour ago, EliW said:

One more thing if i want to switch from hard to soft or soft to hard can i if i remove the old paint or double layer a soft and hard so when the soft goes the hard shows? Just wondering.

All of the paint manufacturers have charts that show what paint can be applied over other paints and how to properly prep the surface. A basic rule of thumb is that soft paint can be applied over hard paint, but not the other way around. 

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Other basic rule ? Few soft will stick to a well done slick, hard surfaced paint...……..

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9 minutes ago, cyclops2 said:

Other basic rule ? Few soft will stick to a well done slick, hard surfaced paint...……..

Ok, true. I just pulled up Interlux's compatibility chart. Their recommendations show that if VC-17m is the current paint, the only compatible paint is more VC-17m. All other paints require complete removal of VC-17m prior to painting.

Basically, I don't recommend VC-17m for your use. It's too much of a unicorn. It's great for racing boats, but for pleasure use it's a pain.

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On 5/10/2019 at 10:53 AM, rjbergen said:

If you're trying to get every last MPH out of it, something like VC-17M will do that. You can even burnish it for an even smoother surface. However, it can't be left out of the water or it will require a scuff sand to reactivate. And every so many years you'll have to have it soda blasted off because it doesn't wear away so each time you touch up the paint you just add more and it gets too thick eventually.

If you want the least maintenance and be able to trailer it without scuff sanding, I would use a soft ablative. There are many choices of soft ablatives and some are better than others. Some also work better in freshwater than saltwater or warm water vs colder water. Where will you be boating?

If you're trying to get every last MPH out of it, something like VC-17M will do that. You can even burnish it for an even smoother surface. However, it can't be left out of the water or it will require a scuff sand to reactivate. And every so many years you'll have to have it soda blasted off because it doesn't wear away so each time you touch up the paint you just add more and it gets too thick eventually.

I heard that they had changed the formula. My girl is a trailer Queen, and I have had mine on since 1992. Only touched it up, never scuffed it to do so, and no build up. It will eventually ware off where it rests or rubs on the trailer. You can also apply it using an airless sprayer, that is how I did mine. I have had gas spill on it with no effect, and I have never wash it. It is some pretty tough stuff.  Denny

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23 hours ago, Curt said:

Regarding anode life, while I know almost zero about saltwater boating, 1.5 months seems ridiculously short. I’m sure you’ve checked, but you’re being supplied with the correct ones, zinc, right?

Actually Aluminum is better than zinc in the salt water here.

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8 minutes ago, Water Dawg 6 said:

Actually Aluminum is better than zinc in the salt water here.

Thanks. 1.5 months is still unreal short.

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1 minute ago, Curt said:

Thanks. 1.5 months is still unreal short.

Yah tell me about it.  I think it has to do with these cheaply made docks around here.  They get beat up by hurricanes and then patched back together by third graders.  So I think the docks around here are causing the excess electrolysis issues.   

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Just now, Water Dawg 6 said:

Yah tell me about it.  I think it has to do with these cheaply made docks around here.  They get beat up by hurricanes and then patched back together by third graders.  So I think the docks around here are causing the excess electrolysis issues.   

Sure could be. I’d stay out of the water around those docks.

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