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EliW

Bottom Paint Questions

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Hey guys, 

 

I have 2018 19Ft H20 Sport with an Inboard Outboard drive. Lime green top and black bottom. I am getting it painted and need some help.

1. What bottom paint or antifouling paint is best for speed and effectiveness (salt water, Severn River Maryland). Speed is a very important part for me.

2. My Stern drive does not come all the way out of the water, is this normal? Should I paint this? How much would it affect speed? If so when the stern drive is fully extended (up) there is a rod from the "hydraulics" that is exposed when it is extended should this be painted too?

 

Sorry guys new to boating and don't want to mess any of this up. Thanks for any help!

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If speed is very important ?  DO NOT COAT ANYTHING WITH PAINT.

Pull the boat. Wash off bottom salt . 

Better still. The offshore racing boats used to coat the CLEANED hull boat bottom with a super slippery coating to increase speed.

Then decide if a lift is available at a marina..  If no lift ?  The trailer in & out.

EXTREME caution is needed for that slippery coating on the bottom. Boats WILL & HAVE slid.................... RIGHT OFF OF fork trucks                   carrying the boats around the boat yard.  Many boat yards REFUSE to accept ANY COSTS / LAWSUITS if the boat has a coated / slippery bottom. Check first who & where will allow that coating.  We racers strap the boat to the fork trucks. Never a slide off.

 

ADDED ///////////////////////       The big straddling lifters have had slippery bottom boats slip off of slings spread outward .  Almost always the curved up bow sling.

Floating all the time in salt water ?  Paint   People do not remember the special needs of a slippery bottom when they are busy.   Your risk decision all the way.

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7 minutes ago, cyclops2 said:

If speed is very important ?  DO NOT COAT ANYTHING WITH PAINT.

Pull the boat. Wash off bottom salt . 

Better still. The offshore racing boats used to coat the CLEANED hull boat bottom with a super slippery coating to increase speed.

Then decide if a lift is available at a marina..  If no lift ?  The trailer in & out.

EXTREME caution is needed for that slippery coating on the bottom. Boats WILL & HAVE slid.................... RIGHT OFF OF fork trucks                   carrying the boats around the boat yard.  Many boat yards REFUSE to accept ANY COSTS / LAWSUITS if the boat has a coated / slippery bottom. Check first who & where will allow that coating.  We racers strap the boat to the fork trucks. Never a slide off.

Ok thanks, ill look into that. how much would paint slow the boat down?

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Checkout   ............Sea Coat Technology ............For some actual results............. Surf the web about super slippery boat bottom coatings.  Lots of information............... They claimed NO growths on the sail boats.  

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Slowing down ?  Too many vairables........... Crappy place ?  enough.   WITH slime & growths............... You have a lot of research to do.

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1 hour ago, cyclops2 said:

Slowing down ?  Too many vairables........... Crappy place ?  enough.   WITH slime & growths............... You have a lot of research to do.

ok thanks

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2 hours ago, EliW said:

Ok thanks, ill look into that. how much would paint slow the boat down?

cyclops can be difficult to understand...bottom paint will slow the boat down less than 5 MPH in most cases.

Soft ablative bottom paints will slow you the most, but require the least maintenance. Hard modified paints won't slow you that much, but many require a scuff sand to reactivate the paint if it's been out of the water more than 24 hours.

Will you ever trailer this boat?

For your sterndrive questions, no, it never comes out of the water like an outboard, and should not be stored in the up position. That places stress on the bellows and it should be stored in the down position. The shiny hydraulic ram should never be painted. It should be kept free of debris and touched as little as possible. That ram must not be scratched so it doesn't leak hydraulic oil. Leave it alone. Do not paint the sterndrive. If you don't know what you're doing, you can cause severe corrosion to your sterndrive. Many bottom paints contain copper which will cause galvanic corrosion with the aluminum outdrive. Any bottom paints that contain metal as an anti-fouling agent should be kept at least 1-inch away from underwater metal surfaces.

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1 hour ago, rjbergen said:

cyclops can be difficult to understand...bottom paint will slow the boat down less than 5 MPH in most cases.

Soft ablative bottom paints will slow you the most, but require the least maintenance. Hard modified paints won't slow you that much, but many require a scuff sand to reactivate the paint if it's been out of the water more than 24 hours.

Will you ever trailer this boat?

For your sterndrive questions, no, it never comes out of the water like an outboard, and should not be stored in the up position. That places stress on the bellows and it should be stored in the down position. The shiny hydraulic ram should never be painted. It should be kept free of debris and touched as little as possible. That ram must not be scratched so it doesn't leak hydraulic oil. Leave it alone. Do not paint the sterndrive. If you don't know what you're doing, you can cause severe corrosion to your sterndrive. Many bottom paints contain copper which will cause galvanic corrosion with the aluminum outdrive. Any bottom paints that contain metal as an anti-fouling agent should be kept at least 1-inch away from underwater metal surfaces.

ok thanks so much, id prefer leaving it in the water at our slip as it is much easier. I'm having professionals do the painting for us just asking more about having it painted and if I should because it develops growth just as much as the bottom of the boat. I'm researching which bottom paint (hard) would be the best for us giving the most speed and best colors (black). I may just end up trailering it instead of painting or taking it out every couple of days and cleaning because there are spots that are covered that we can never clean because of the trailer.

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I don't think you will louse that much speed " down less than 5 MPH in most cases". Maybe 1 or 2 MPH I would think.  I do agree with rjbergen except on painting the drive.

Do paint it, but you MUST use a non copper bottom paint. I do it every year to the drive and hull. Its been 7 years now with this boat and so far so good. I just finished painting last week and the boat goes in next week.

 

Who is going the work? You are a boat yard?

  

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1 minute ago, EliW said:

ok thanks so much, id prefer leaving it in the water at our slip as it is much easier. I'm having professionals do the painting for us just asking more about having it painted and if I should because it develops growth just as much as the bottom of the boat. I'm researching which bottom paint (hard) would be the best for us giving the most speed and best colors (black). I may just end up trailering it instead of painting or taking it out every couple of days and cleaning because there are spots that are covered that we can never clean because of the trailer.

I would use an ablative, not a hard. The hard will build up over time and then it will need to be soda blasted off.  

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Bottom paint WILL slow you down. 

I have a heavier boat than yours (with more surface area...more drag).  When I purchased the boat, the older bottom job needed refreshing.  But before I spent money on a new bottom job, I was trying to troubleshoot performance issues first.  Mechanic went through the boat and nothing seemed to work.  I finally accepted the slow planing time and slower than anticipated top end speed. 

Next season I had the bottom stripped and repainted.  It looked SO nice!  Took the boat out on the water and found that I picked up around 10 MPH!  Point is, as the bottom paint ablates you will lose even more speed.  Keep the bottom refreshed and you'll keep as much speed as possible but certainly lose some MPH over a clean, non-bottom painted boat.

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About scum areas & trailers.....................

Bunk / long board trailers are not my type for salt water boats. ...............Roller  trailers are what  I consider the best for salt water hull bottoms. Easy to do a super clean job.

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3 hours ago, Iggy said:

I don't think you will louse that much speed " down less than 5 MPH in most cases". Maybe 1 or 2 MPH I would think.  I do agree with rjbergen except on painting the drive.

Do paint it, but you MUST use a non copper bottom paint. I do it every year to the drive and hull. Its been 7 years now with this boat and so far so good. I just finished painting last week and the boat goes in next week.

 

Who is going the work? You are a boat yard?

  

I'm going to "Prestige Yacht Management" for the painting.

 

Thanks so much for all the replies. I think I'm just gonna have to suck it up and go with paint, still deciding between hard or soft. a 1-2 mph difference is not worth trailering my boat in and out or cleaning it every 4-5 days. Unless it is as bad as @TexasPilot71 explained.

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Growth build up in the water varies ….WILDLY ….. depends on the water temperature , nutrients in the berthing dock area. Also currents & amount of sunlight going under the hull bringing new growths & critters to attack the hull.

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Posted (edited)

No question, if you pull it Dont paint it. If you slip it you have to paint the bottom and the outdrive - different paints. I swear by Pettit Ablative hydrocoat for the bottom, I use an outboard ablative spray can also by pettit. This season I had to actually use a paint on the outdrive because the actual paint had worn off in some spots, but that should last another 5 years or so with only having to do the ablative spray each season. I keep mine slipped in salt water and splash from, at earliest, April ( but no later than the Kentucky Derby) to Halloween 

Edited by 287SSX
clarification

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16 hours ago, EliW said:

. a 1-2 mph difference is not worth trailering my boat in and out or cleaning it every 4-5 days. Unless it is as bad as @TexasPilot71 explained.

Remember, I'm not comparing unpainted to painted.  Just saying that my experience with a painted hull was such that if you let the paint "go" it can eventually erode your speed considerably.

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On 5/7/2019 at 7:15 PM, EliW said:

I'm going to "Prestige Yacht Management" for the painting.

 

Thanks so much for all the replies. I think I'm just gonna have to suck it up and go with paint, still deciding between hard or soft. a 1-2 mph difference is not worth trailering my boat in and out or cleaning it every 4-5 days. Unless it is as bad as @TexasPilot71 explained.

I found that this paint works the best on the out-drives. I tried the spray on, but this will give you a better coat and its glossy.  https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?path=-1|2200442|2200447|2200453&id=2108143

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I think the big question is, why is speed very important to you?  If speed is that important, you probably should have made another boat choice.  A 19' H20's a great boot, but it's not what one would consider a speedy boat.  

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20 hours ago, 287SSX said:

No question, if you pull it Dont paint it. If you slip it you have to paint the bottom and the outdrive - different paints. I swear by Pettit Ablative hydrocoat for the bottom, I use an outboard ablative spray can also by pettit. This season I had to actually use a paint on the outdrive because the actual paint had worn off in some spots, but that should last another 5 years or so with only having to do the ablative spray each season. I keep mine slipped in salt water and splash from, at earliest, April ( but no later than the Kentucky Derby) to Halloween 

Same here.  The bottom paint and the outdrive paint I used worked really well this past season, considering the boat was slipped in salt water all summer.  It takes a bit of work to paint the outdrive and get all the areas that need paint, but well worth it when it was time to haul her out.  A little bit of growth in small areas but generally, the paint repelled most of it.

I have a new product I'm going to try this year that I bought at the NE boat show called "Prop Glop."  Supposedly it works really well!

tPBYJsq.jpg

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Bottom paint should last between 3-5 years.  However, if you beach your boat (pulling up to islands, etc.) you will loose that paint very quickly.  Also, West Marine sells a Spray Paint specifically for outdrives.  Outdrives usually have to be done every year.  Because remember this - you WILL have to pay a diver every month or so to clean the bottom of you boat and outdrives if your boat stays in the water to remove barnacles, muscles and other growth.  And when the diver does this he will eventually be scrapping all the paint of your drives no matter how careful they are.  Hatem must have some good water where he is at, cause I'm in salt water and the growth is ridiculous here no matter what type of paint you put on the boat.  My boat has a 10 feet beam so I keep her in the water cause it's too big for my truck to tow and in NC anything 10 feet or great you have to have special permits to tow it on the roads.  But with your boat, I would highly recommend you trailer it.  It will cost you less in the long run.  Cause with the outdrives in the water you also go through zincs (anodes) like crazy and they can get pretty pricy.  And is an extra cost people don't think about.  Plus, your bellows wear out faster, it's hard to change the oil and gear lube, removing and lubing your props, and doing other standard outdrive maintenance. 

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53 minutes ago, Water Dawg 6 said:

Bottom paint should last between 3-5 years.  However, if you beach your boat (pulling up to islands, etc.) you will loose that paint very quickly.  Also, West Marine sells a Spray Paint specifically for outdrives.  Outdrives usually have to be done every year.  Because remember this - you WILL have to pay a diver every month or so to clean the bottom of you boat and outdrives if your boat stays in the water to remove barnacles, muscles and other growth.  And when the diver does this he will eventually be scrapping all the paint of your drives no matter how careful they are.  Hatem must have some good water where he is at, cause I'm in salt water and the growth is ridiculous here no matter what type of paint you put on the boat.  My boat has a 10 feet beam so I keep her in the water cause it's too big for my truck to tow and in NC anything 10 feet or great you have to have special permits to tow it on the roads.  But with your boat, I would highly recommend you trailer it.  It will cost you less in the long run.  Cause with the outdrives in the water you also go through zincs (anodes) like crazy and they can get pretty pricy.  And is an extra cost people don't think about.  Plus, your bellows wear out faster, it's hard to change the oil and gear lube, removing and lubing your props, and doing other standard outdrive maintenance. 

Are you saying that after you bottom paint, you still need a diver to clean your hull?

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59 minutes ago, Water Dawg 6 said:

Bottom paint should last between 3-5 years.  However, if you beach your boat (pulling up to islands, etc.) you will loose that paint very quickly.  Also, West Marine sells a Spray Paint specifically for outdrives.  Outdrives usually have to be done every year.  Because remember this - you WILL have to pay a diver every month or so to clean the bottom of you boat and outdrives if your boat stays in the water to remove barnacles, muscles and other growth.  And when the diver does this he will eventually be scrapping all the paint of your drives no matter how careful they are.  Hatem must have some good water where he is at, cause I'm in salt water and the growth is ridiculous here no matter what type of paint you put on the boat.  My boat has a 10 feet beam so I keep her in the water cause it's too big for my truck to tow and in NC anything 10 feet or great you have to have special permits to tow it on the roads.  But with your boat, I would highly recommend you trailer it.  It will cost you less in the long run.  Cause with the outdrives in the water you also go through zincs (anodes) like crazy and they can get pretty pricy.  And is an extra cost people don't think about.  Plus, your bellows wear out faster, it's hard to change the oil and gear lube, removing and lubing your props, and doing other standard outdrive maintenance. 

I'm a freshwater boater on the Great Lakes, so some differences, but I never have a diver clean my bottom and my boat comes clean with a pressure washer when they haul it out for winter.

Also, for zincs, use Boat Zincs. I've used them for 5 years and they have good prices. They range from $33 to $43 for an anode set (price varies by material) for VP SX/DP drives. I get 2 years out of magnesium anodes in freshwater. If you're going through zincs "like crazy" you are either using the wrong zincs, or there is an electrical problem in where you dock (could be your boat, your neighbors' boats, or the dock itself).

As for bellows, sure they wear out slightly faster in the water, but you still get 5 years or so out of them. Depending on the drive, gear lube can be impossible to change while in the water (on VP DP drives like mine, the drain plug is behind the props).

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12 minutes ago, rjbergen said:

I'm a freshwater boater on the Great Lakes, so some differences, but I never have a diver clean my bottom and my boat comes clean with a pressure washer when they haul it out for winter.

Also, for zincs, use Boat Zincs. I've used them for 5 years and they have good prices. They range from $33 to $43 for an anode set (price varies by material) for VP SX/DP drives. I get 2 years out of magnesium anodes in freshwater. If you're going through zincs "like crazy" you are either using the wrong zincs, or there is an electrical problem in where you dock (could be your boat, your neighbors' boats, or the dock itself).

As for bellows, sure they wear out slightly faster in the water, but you still get 5 years or so out of them. Depending on the drive, gear lube can be impossible to change while in the water (on VP DP drives like mine, the drain plug is behind the props).

Yep!! But my bellows lasted 8 years in salt water. I went in the slip in May and come out in October. So the drives never went more than half way up.

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RJ, I have Bravo III outdrives and my prop anodes alone cost me 50+.  I use boat zincs to buy the kits, but the prop anode that comes in the kit doesn't fit my prop, so I always have to buy them at West Marine.  Two years??? I get a month and half if I'm lucky.  It's not my boat as I have a Mercathoid system and a Galvonic Isolator.  I did find once though that my neighbor was using a non-marine battery charger next to me.  But other than that don't know why the electrolysis is so bad here.  I've switched to three different Marinas in the area and they're all the same and my neighbors have all burned through them as well.  Salt water is definitely different than fresh when it comes to bottom growth (specifically with the muscles and barnacles).  If you don't have a diver here your boat isn't leaving the dock cause you'll never get on plane that's for sure.  I can share with you the link to the YouTube channel my diver has which shows the before and after videos of the cleaning under my boat and what it looks like in just one month.  It's crazy!

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Iggy, yes I still need a diver even though my paint is very good.  However, the hull doesn't too too bad it's more the Outdrives that get the thick muscles and barnacles all over them.

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