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Phillbo

Ramp Follies...

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We've all done it. That bone head move while on the ramp. I've had a few.... Post them up here.

 

Me first- backed the cruiser in to the same depth I always do and climbed aboard. Fired it up and let it warm a minute while checking the bilge. Everything was good so I started to back it off the trailer. Was not moving.. gave it more throttle and still not moving. Just then I see the guy standing at the winch of his trailer in the lane next to me look at me and laugh. He says "I'll get your winch strap for you buddy".... I forgot to unclip the winch strap before climbing on board. 

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My worst boat ramp fail, with my first boat in my 20s (51 now):

. . . prior to getting in line to launch, the admiral and I performed our respective tasks.  One of hers was to install the snap-type plug (you see where this is going).  After launching, while idling around some distance from the ramp, the engine began running rough due to being partially submerged.  The plug, which I was unaware had adjustable tension, had fallen out.  I was very green at the time, but remembered a lesson from my father that, at speed, water in the bilge would be sucked out.  Problem: heavy deep vee 19' Renken boat, 4 cylinder engine, LOTS of water weight in the bilge.  It didn't sink, but for a time I was looking for somewhere to beach it.  Finally got it to plane.  More to the story, but it ends with the boat on the trailer with no harm done.

Later my admiral would remark:  "Yeah, the plug was so loose I could pull it right out again".  Obviously she didn't realize the significance of that . . .  Ultimately my fault of course.

Certainly have witnessed many instances of mistakes others have made on the ramp, but I love the idea of telling on ourselves.  Great idea, Philbo.

 

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Cranked and cranked on my old 243 while backed into the water at the ramp, would not start, blocking incoming boaters. Raised hatch and looked around, jiggled wires and all that stuff. It had always started first turn, just couldn’t figure it out. After what seemed like the longest time with the stares of others cutting me up I was about ready to haul her home when my wife mentions the kill switch. Sure enough that was it, it had slipped off. I felt like an idiot.

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The forgotten or lost plug stories abound :)

 

Thats one reason my plug is never out unless I am standing at the transom with it in my hand. The NPS ranger at Powell perform Mussel inspections where they require you to remove your plug and lower your outdrive when retrieving at the ramp. They tell me it is illegal to trailer a boat with the plug in... I tell them my bilge is always dry (as proven by nothing coming out when I removed the plug) and screw it back in before going about my business...

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2 minutes ago, Chap243 said:

Cranked and cranked on my old 243 while backed into the water at the ramp, would not start, blocking incoming boaters. Raised hatch and looked around, jiggled wired and all that stuff. It had always started first turn, just couldn’t figure it out. After what seemed like the longest time with the stares of others cutting me up I was about ready to haul her home when my wife mentions the kill switch. Sure enough that was it, it had slipped off. I felt like an idiot.

Dude.. I took a boat to my mechanic once for a no start issue.. He laughed at me, flipped the kill switch up and made me buy him lunch..... 

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The funniest one I had was when me and my buddy were pulling a small cruiser that I had. We had stopped and got the trailer out of the storage lot and then he was going to back the trailer in while I brought the boat around. I pulled the boat up on the trailer while he was going to connect the bow strap. Well the next thing I see is he is slapping his shorts and trying to get them off while he is running into the lake. Turned out that some yellow jackets had made a nest in the trailer and were mad after the trailer had been submerged. A couple of them had flown up his shorts. Funniest thing to watch, I am sure he didn't think so.

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I have called my marina & asked how long it will take for thr repairs to be completed ?

Let me know when I drop it off.  

Boat at the wrong marina ?:funny-7327:

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Oh the boat plug....we played that game once years ago with our first boat. 

My wife backed the trailer down the ramp while I got the boat going. Once we were launched I cruised over to the spot where she would hop into the boat. As she stepped into the boat she instantly saw water in the back near the rear seats and jumped back onto shore. She backed the trailer down faster than she ever has and as I kept the boat moving. The engine stalled the moment I lined it up and we were able to coast the last few feet right onto the trailer.

Close call but all was ok. 

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23 hours ago, robbo8199 said:

She backed the trailer down faster than she ever has

You're very lucky. My wife won't touch reverse with a trailer attached.

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Second time launching and the boat didn't come off the trailer on the first or second time. Checked that the winch strap was disconnected and tried again a little deeper. Hammered the brakes and the boat came off. Top half of the tie downs were still attached to transom.

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Single lane boat ramp. Backed boat in and tried to start it. Turns out the starter went bad. winched the boat back tight to the roller and went to the truck. Noticed that it was not running. So, I attempted to start it. It would not start due to the steepness of the ramp and the 1/3 full fuel tank. A good samaritan took me to a gas station where I bought a gas can and filled it with gas (20 minutes away). By the time we got back there was an incredible line in the lake and in the parking lot. My first mate had smartly given out our food and drinks to try to appease the crowd. I now have a full tank of gas each and every time I got to this ramp. 

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First year boating, came home to marina after a solo day on the water. Spun the boat around at the high and dry dock with a few forward/back strokes on the throttle.

When bow was within a foot of the dock, I walked up to the bow with line in hand and stepped off... only to realize that I had left the throttle one click in reverse.

Me and another boater on the dock started pulling hard on the line, to no avail, as my boat slowly puttered away in reverse, and pulled us both in.

Two dock hands started sprinting to the opposite side of the basin towards where the boat was (slowly) heading, while I was sunk to my hips in mud and having no luck mounting the bow.

Just as the stern arrived at the opposite side dock, a dock hand jumped on board and shut her down. Tapped the dock with a quiet thunk. No damage, except to my ego (and wallet, due to the large tips I handed out to the dock hands).

Lesson for the day: even minimum throttle on prop puts out more thrust than a large man can overcome.

 

 

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Am I the only person to try jumping from a canoe to the dock ?:o

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Back in the early days of my boating I was reversing down the slip and a glance in the door mirror showed that the bilge pump was working overtime and water was streaming out the pipe exit. It immediately dawned on me that I'd not put the bung in. Thankfully the boat was still firmly affixed to the trailer so out she came and in went the bung before launch.

Funnily enough I've never forgotten to put the bung in since that time.

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Thats why my plug never leaves my hand when it is out of the drain hole. 

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5 hours ago, Phillbo said:

Thats why my plug never leaves my hand when it is out of the drain hole. 

Hmmm, must be awkward on dates.

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On 6/7/2019 at 1:51 PM, Toddavid said:

First year boating, came home to marina after a solo day on the water. Spun the boat around at the high and dry dock with a few forward/back strokes on the throttle.

When bow was within a foot of the dock, I walked up to the bow with line in hand and stepped off... only to realize that I had left the throttle one click in reverse.

Me and another boater on the dock started pulling hard on the line, to no avail, as my boat slowly puttered away in reverse, and pulled us both in.

Two dock hands started sprinting to the opposite side of the basin towards where the boat was (slowly) heading, while I was sunk to my hips in mud and having no luck mounting the bow.

Just as the stern arrived at the opposite side dock, a dock hand jumped on board and shut her down. Tapped the dock with a quiet thunk. No damage, except to my ego (and wallet, due to the large tips I handed out to the dock hands).

Lesson for the day: even minimum throttle on prop puts out more thrust than a large man can overcome.

 

 

That was horrible at the time but that's funny. After I retire all I need is a chair, cooler, and a boat ramp.

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1 hour ago, summerpenguin said:

Hmmm, must be awkward on dates.

LOL...   Like i said before, no reason to ever remove my plug unless asked to do so by the NPS Ranger on the ramp when retrieving. If so, I take it out, show them the bilge is dry and put it right back in. 

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Forgot plug in my bass boat.  Forgot to trim motor up when rushing to get out of ramp yesterday (nasty storm, screaming kids, flash flood advisories...)

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I find that when in a rush the best thing to do is slow down. You do thing much quicker and more efficient if you slow down. 

I learned that from Yoda :)

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5 minutes ago, Phillbo said:

I find that when in a rush the best thing to do is slow down. You do thing much quicker and more efficient if you slow down. 

I learned that from Yoda :)

With this storm anyone would have been in a rush, had waves forming in ICW, lightning everywhere, i had to look to make sure it wasnt hail.  Pretty nasty, we had 1 ft of water on road as we pulled out of ramp.  Key is planning to avoid rush.

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Years ago, I had picked up the boat at the repair shop and took it to the marina and launched. It didn't feel right so I pulled the engine cover and see water coming in. No plug.  I also learned that the faster you go, the more water flows OUT and when you slow down, water comes back IN.  I never knew he pulled the plug but I never checked either.

But the worse screw up I made was when I was towing the Boat/ trainer home after inspection. I'm cruising along and everything is fine. Went over a couple of bumps and of course I look at them to make sure they are still there.  I get home and I do a walk-around. Gee, why does the hitch and coupler look funny.  I walk closer to it and suddenly realized that the coupler was not clamped down and pinned. I just stood there completely perplexed.  All I could think of was how the heck did this stay on the ball! Good tongue wait I guess.  

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