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Hello all new to this site  I have a 1995 2130 SST which has some soft spots on the deck. Does anyone know if the stringers are glassed in or exposed wood? Also, I'm wondering if I should pull all the decking out and replace or just repair the rotted area.  All advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks

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Stringers on many boats you have to pop the cap.  I would see about dissecting deck and see how bad rot is, if bad consider using your boat as a donor for sound hull if yours is bad.  Some people sell good hull w/ bad engine/ drive for cheap (new turn key block is around 7k & long block is 3.5k) so it can easily be an upside down project.  My boat has been almost 11k book is 9, i did engine and upholstery so know i will have good luck for next few years and price is worth peace of mind since major stuff i know is done.

Rot is going to hold moisture and keep spreading so you have to get it all.

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Thanks for getting back Rwright1985 not sure what "pop the cap" means. After the season I plan on pulling the boat out of the water and pull the carpet back to see exactly what I am dealing with.  I'm hoping that I can just cut out what is bad and replace with new decking. Also if it works out I would like to put something back down other than carpet, something that will not hold moisture. 

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On ‎7‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 10:29 AM, steele153 said:

Hello all new to this site  I have a 1995 2130 SST which has some soft spots on the deck. Does anyone know if the stringers are glassed in or exposed wood? Also, I'm wondering if I should pull all the decking out and replace or just repair the rotted area.  All advice is appreciated.

Thanks

The stringers on a 1995 boat are almost certainly glassed in.  That doesn't mean that after a certain amount of water exposure that it finds its way thought a defective or cracked section and rot out the stringer at that area and spread out depending on how long it's been doing that. 

As far as repairing it, the extent will be determined as to whether you intend to keep the boat and are willing to put in all the necessary work to fix everything (AND it can be a lot of work) and if you're like me and many of us, we wouldn't mind tackling such a project because we have the skills and the desire.  If you don't then pass it along and try to get something in better condition.

9 hours ago, steele153 said:

Thanks for getting back Rwright1985 not sure what "pop the cap" means. After the season I plan on pulling the boat out of the water and pull the carpet back to see exactly what I am dealing with.  I'm hoping that I can just cut out what is bad and replace with new decking. Also if it works out I would like to put something back down other than carpet, something that will not hold moisture. 

If it has glued on carpet, then I doubt it has a "cap" as previously mentioned.  Usually glued-on carpet and "soft spots" means a plywood floor sitting on stringers.  Sometimes, depending on the model, the front floor area is all fiberglass so the plywood floor stops at that area and you don't need to go all the way to the bow, which means dismantling everything including the helm to remove it and expose the entire wood floor.

Cut out what is the bad section like you said and try to take a look inside with a strong light (careful for gas fumes) or a flashlight to see the extent of the damage.  A lot of times you can tell how much water has been in there just by looking at the motor mounts and what condition they're in.

If after you see everything as best as possible with a flashlight and are convinced 100% that everything else looks good, you can repair that section of plywood and then add a fairing compound (very easy to do if you've done any wall board work in your house and sanded it down for painting, that's what fairing is) and cover all other plywood with that and then paint several coats of gelcoat.  I've simplified the method for you to keep it short but then you have a very nice, gelcoated floor that is water resitant but there are several other things you will need to do like add self bailing drains etc. So if you do decide to go that way, let us know and I can walk you through it step by step including videos to help you.

But first, you have to be certain that the only damage that was done is the soft plywood floor in that one section and the rest of the boat (including the stringers) are in good shape.  Can you take pics and post them once you get in there?

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The cap is the top part of the boat that wraps to the inside.  I had a bass boat that I had to do stringers (back half rotted) deck and transom.  The way the deck sat had edges of the floor tucked far under the cap where it transitioned into the floor and went out to outer edge of hull, so couldnt even kick it in by sections, some boats are more accessible where plywood is just attached to the stringers and not tucked too much and its patient carpentry work with a jigsaw puzzle, just have to look at it carefully and try seeing as much as possible because you can get in over your head easily.  I had to pull engine, rear deck, rub rail and split it apart which was a nightmare.  Not too expensive to do but a lot of labor. 

Knowing what i know now with some people ditching basketcase boats if I had to do it again i would find a new boat w/ major mechanical issues (like my current boat was when i bought it for 1k with blown head gasket, warped block deck, stripped starter bolt hole, bad riser bent rod... but hull just need a lot of elbow grease and upholstery, trailer needed tongue and lights) and have used mine as a donor since stringers and transom were a nightmare.

Main thing is trying to accurately figure out what is going on because it could be the deck was replaced and not secured well in certain spots like my friends boat where we just had to pull up 1/2 the deck and put a strip to join front and rear half between the stringers or it can be an ugly can of worms like my bass boat.

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9 hours ago, Hatem said:

The stringers on a 1995 boat are almost certainly glassed in.  That doesn't mean that after a certain amount of water exposure that it finds its way thought a defective or cracked section and rot out the stringer at that area and spread out depending on how long it's been doing that. 

As far as repairing it, the extent will be determined as to whether you intend to keep the boat and are willing to put in all the necessary work to fix everything (AND it can be a lot of work) and if you're like me and many of us, we wouldn't mind tackling such a project because we have the skills and the desire.  If you don't then pass it along and try to get something in better condition.

If it has glued on carpet, then I doubt it has a "cap" as previously mentioned.  Usually glued-on carpet and "soft spots" means a plywood floor sitting on stringers.  Sometimes, depending on the model, the front floor area is all fiberglass so the plywood floor stops at that area and you don't need to go all the way to the bow, which means dismantling everything including the helm to remove it and expose the entire wood floor.

Cut out what is the bad section like you said and try to take a look inside with a strong light (careful for gas fumes) or a flashlight to see the extent of the damage.  A lot of times you can tell how much water has been in there just by looking at the motor mounts and what condition they're in.

If after you see everything as best as possible with a flashlight and are convinced 100% that everything else looks good, you can repair that section of plywood and then add a fairing compound (very easy to do if you've done any wall board work in your house and sanded it down for painting, that's what fairing is) and cover all other plywood with that and then paint several coats of gelcoat.  I've simplified the method for you to keep it short but then you have a very nice, gelcoated floor that is water resitant but there are several other things you will need to do like add self bailing drains etc. So if you do decide to go that way, let us know and I can walk you through it step by step including videos to help you.

But first, you have to be certain that the only damage that was done is the soft plywood floor in that one section and the rest of the boat (including the stringers) are in good shape.  Can you take pics and post them once you get in there?

Now what would a glued carpet have to do with the stringers being capped? Please explain?

 

A boat like this as Rwight had explained can be costly. The big question is, is it worth it too you?

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2 hours ago, Rwright1985 said:

The cap is the top part of the boat that wraps to the inside.  I had a bass boat that I had to do stringers (back half rotted) deck and transom.  The way the deck sat had edges of the floor tucked far under the cap where it transitioned into the floor and went out to outer edge of hull, so couldnt even kick it in by sections, some boats are more accessible where plywood is just attached to the stringers and not tucked too much and its patient carpentry work with a jigsaw puzzle, just have to look at it carefully and try seeing as much as possible because you can get in over your head easily.

This is the boat he's talking about in the bellow attached video.  Drew used to have a 1999 2335 SS which is almost identical.  If you search this forum, you'll find a thread about the comparison of wood used in Chaparral boats vs other brands that he had opened up that ran about 10 pages (just a guess) but we took a lot of pictures of the insides of our boats including members with 210ssi's and such and we found out for the most part that all the stringers are glassed in as well as filet'ed, believe it or not.  Granted some of the glassing of the top areas at the top of the bulkheads didn't have much glassing from what we saw.  But the bulkheads joining stringers and hull sides were all very well done.  And if you look at this video, you'll see exactly what I described that the carpeted section runs from the stern engine hatch opening just to the entrance through the helm to the bow seating area.  That floor in the front is actually fiberglass and part of that entire cap which includes the gunwale and the side walls and also sits on plywood floor.  That fiberglass floor would need to come off if the plywood flooring under it needed to come of and yeah, that's basically a Frisco job.  The part that has the teal/blue glued on carpeting is 100% marine plywood under it and has a tendency to get wet and rot more so than the front area under that fiberglass, but if you want to take all that fiberglass apart just to fix a few soft spots on the plywood floor IF the stringers are in good shape, be my guest.  (Not directing that at you personally, just we've been through this several times with several modes through the many years of Chaparral's development) and it's best to open that one section of rotted floor area and take a look at the stringers, then look at the motor mounts and those are really the only, two, manageable, repairable areas without doing a complete disassembly. 

 

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1 hour ago, Rwright1985 said:

I don't think I have the time to read all 47 pages, but looks like it's right along the lines we were talking about.  Carpet gets wet, plywood below it starts to get wet and STAY wet and when it dries, that is really when the rot begins.  If it dried quickly, it usually is ok.  (I'm in the construction business and a woodworker for 35 years just FYI) but I do see where you mentioned the panels.   All those side walls and seats and whatever is sitting on that wood will need to come off.  Yeah it can turn into a bear for sure. 

I've actually been thinking of joining that forum for a long time, now.  Looks like a bunch of neat fellas compared to this @#$%@# hole :D and much more boating enthusiasm which is the main draw.  I also see Drew in there.  I've seen a few of those, a few videos and actually helped a friend with his (my end was VERY MINOR) since I just don't have the time.  Are you on that forum? 

Anyway, good luck to the OP hopefully it's just a contained spot...

 

On ‎7‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 10:29 AM, steele153 said:

Hello all new to this site  I have a 1995 2130 SST which has some soft spots on the deck. Does anyone know if the stringers are glassed in or exposed wood? Also, I'm wondering if I should pull all the decking out and replace or just repair the rotted area.  All advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks

Does your carpet floor run just to the helm way entrance into the bow seating area and there actually is a thin, fiberglass skin for the floor at the bow seating area or does the carpeting run all the way to the bow area?

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I am pretty sure i have an account there and on THT but dont use them other than snooping.  Just now i was trying to figure out how to add hours to my boats hourmeter.  Saw they are using a sine generator @ i believe 430hz so going to see if i can just use a pik or arduino.  Just like any forum, some usefull some bad.

 

Im on here because you guys are probably most knowledgeable on these fancy boats.  Im overwhelmed with hour meter, trim gauge, speedo that works, cargo capacity, squishy cushions, cigarette lighter, anchor box...  My bass boat was minimal 150HP 1350lbs loaded no passengers to give you an idea of how stripped it was.

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16 hours ago, Iggy said:

Now what would a glued carpet have to do with the stringers being capped? Please explain?

 

A boat like this as Rwight had explained can be costly. The big question is, is it worth it too you?

Actually carpet makes it possibly better. Since it holds moisture could accelerate rotting rate hopefully just hitting the deck.  Cost isnt that much, probably less than 500 bucks, time is the factor

Proper rot i guess you could say would be bottom to top so stringers and such should be beaten up more than a deck.  Also try sticking to as much 3/4 marine ply as you can if you redo it.  Its optimal size for cost.

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5 hours ago, Hatem said:

I don't think I have the time to read all 47 pages, but looks like it's right along the lines we were talking about.  Carpet gets wet, plywood below it starts to get wet and STAY wet and when it dries, that is really when the rot begins.  If it dried quickly, it usually is ok.  (I'm in the construction business and a woodworker for 35 years just FYI) but I do see where you mentioned the panels.   All those side walls and seats and whatever is sitting on that wood will need to come off.  Yeah it can turn into a bear for sure. 

I've actually been thinking of joining that forum for a long time, now.  Looks like a bunch of neat fellas compared to this @#$%@# hole :D and much more boating enthusiasm which is the main draw.  I also see Drew in there.  I've seen a few of those, a few videos and actually helped a friend with his (my end was VERY MINOR) since I just don't have the time.  Are you on that forum? 

Anyway, good luck to the OP hopefully it's just a contained spot...

 

Does your carpet floor run just to the helm way entrance into the bow seating area and there actually is a thin, fiberglass skin for the floor at the bow seating area or does the carpeting run all the way to the bow area?

My carpet runs to just under the front seats the bow area is fiberglass setting on wood. I really don't want to disassemble the entire helm to get to that wood. would like to just repair the rot on the stern side of the boat and be done with it. When I pull the boat out of the water at the end of the season will post some pictures for your input.  If some of the strings did show signs of deterioration and did not replace just replace the rotted decking would could be the consequences.  

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5 hours ago, Hatem said:

I don't think I have the time to read all 47 pages, but looks like it's right along the lines we were talking about.  Carpet gets wet, plywood below it starts to get wet and STAY wet and when it dries, that is really when the rot begins.  If it dried quickly, it usually is ok.  (I'm in the construction business and a woodworker for 35 years just FYI) but I do see where you mentioned the panels.   All those side walls and seats and whatever is sitting on that wood will need to come off.  Yeah it can turn into a bear for sure. 

I've actually been thinking of joining that forum for a long time, now.  Looks like a bunch of neat fellas compared to this @#$%@# hole :D and much more boating enthusiasm which is the main draw.  I also see Drew in there.  I've seen a few of those, a few videos and actually helped a friend with his (my end was VERY MINOR) since I just don't have the time.  Are you on that forum? 

Anyway, good luck to the OP hopefully it's just a contained spot...

 

Does your carpet floor run just to the helm way entrance into the bow seating area and there actually is a thin, fiberglass skin for the floor at the bow seating area or does the carpeting run all the way to the bow area?

My carpet runs just to the helm way entrance, not into the bow seating area.

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16 minutes ago, Rwright1985 said:

Actually carpet makes it possibly better. Since it holds moisture could accelerate rotting rate hopefully just hitting the deck.  Cost isnt that much, probably less than 500 bucks, time is the factor

Thanks, that part i get. What i didn't is why having carpet means that the stringers are capped is what Hatem is saying.

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Steele,

I think your project is going to be very similar to the link I sent you.  I would look at that and try seeing how similar it is, areas they had problems and try looking at with a borescope, mirror, flashlight & whatever creative ways you can, take notes and keep digging as minimally invasive as you can while enjoying the boat  a little.  My bass boat took about a month and a half working intensively on it, due to all the grinding, fitting everything as close as you can, glassing & allowing resin to set before next step....

 

Iggy,

I think he was thinking more along the lines of older hulls where they would use the carpet as a transition to the Gunwale since carpet would give prettier transition for the price than trying to glass a molded contour.  Then they just put a guard on the edge of the glass to prevent injuries, still looks decent and saves a lot of work as they started glassing floors and such they went to bigger more elaborate molds, looks really nice, but everything for the hull is sealed pretty freaking good.

image.jpeg.de7f6df9ef7360c28dd10dc850d1f6e8.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Rwright1985 said:

Steele,

I think your project is going to be very similar to the link I sent you.  I would look at that and try seeing how similar it is, areas they had problems and try looking at with a borescope, mirror, flashlight & whatever creative ways you can, take notes and keep digging as minimally invasive as you can while enjoying the boat  a little.  My bass boat took about a month and a half working intensively on it, due to all the grinding, fitting everything as close as you can, glassing & allowing resin to set before next step....

 

Iggy,

I think he was thinking more along the lines of older hulls where they would use the carpet as a transition to the Gunwale since carpet would give prettier transition for the price than trying to glass a molded contour.  Then they just put a guard on the edge of the glass to prevent injuries, still looks decent and saves a lot of work as they started glassing floors and such they went to bigger more elaborate molds, looks really nice, but everything for the hull is sealed pretty freaking good.

image.jpeg.de7f6df9ef7360c28dd10dc850d1f6e8.jpeg

Oh, thanks!

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21 hours ago, steele153 said:

My carpet runs just to the helm way entrance, not into the bow seating area.

That's what I thought, which is why I asked because that has a lot to do with how much disassembling you'll need to do, should the plywood be in just absolutey terrible shape, as in worst case condition.  That means that the from bow seating area  where the carpet ends at the helm walkway is a thin (approx. 1/4") fiberglass floor lining that is GLUED to the plywood floor.  It is a BEAR, no wait, a WHALE to remove the plywood in that section, again the reason why I brought it up.  And in many cases, it's actually a completely molded section that includes the walls for the bow seats and the helm storage and even the helm itself!  So you want to hope and pray that not only the plywood under that fiberglass lining floor is fine, but that the stringers are ok under that bow area. 

21 hours ago, Iggy said:

Thanks, that part i get. What i didn't is why having carpet means that the stringers are capped is what Hatem is saying.

I never made any correlation between the carpeted flooring and the stringers being glassed.  Not sure where you got that.  Find what I said that made you think that and paste it and I'll bet you it was a complete misunderstanding on your part.

21 hours ago, Rwright1985 said:

I am pretty sure i have an account there and on THT but dont use them other than snooping.  Just now i was trying to figure out how to add hours to my boats hourmeter.  Saw they are using a sine generator @ i believe 430hz so going to see if i can just use a pik or arduino.  Just like any forum, some usefull some bad.

 

Im on here because you guys are probably most knowledgeable on these fancy boats.  Im overwhelmed with hour meter, trim gauge, speedo that works, cargo capacity, squishy cushions, cigarette lighter, anchor box...  My bass boat was minimal 150HP 1350lbs loaded no passengers to give you an idea of how stripped it was.

Hey man, if anyone has NO idea what boat you're talking about, all they have to do is take a look at that video and see how awesome it is.

Like Right and myself said, just peel off the carpet right at that soft spot of flooring first and take a pic and post it.  Tell us exactly where it is in relation to the boat and the gas tank.  Then we can take it from there.  I told you how you can replace the entire floor and gelcoat its so you have no more carpeting getting wet or can even install carpet sections to make it cozy and homy. There are A LOT of GREAT products out there for exactly that function.  But get under that deck any way you can and examine as much as you can on how much water damage is done to the stringers or bulkheads or motor mounts.  If the engine is installed directly over the stringers, check for compression marks and take pics and show them to us.  I would do whatever I could (shy of replacing the entire plywood flooring and stringer systems to keep that boat.  Do you know how to post pics?  Very easy, copy their JPG link and just paste that link into the box and the pic will automatically show up.

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The boat in that video is like mine except my boat has two captain chairs in front and a bench seat that runs across the back with a 5.7L merc. I did some further investigating since my last post. I opened up my ski compartment and stuck my hand up toward the bow area to inspect that plywood and I can tell that it does have some damage but I don't think it is that bad not bad enough to disassemble the entire helm to repair that small of a piece of wood. I'm just hoping that my stringers are Okay and all I have to do is repair the rot which is all on the starboard side.

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6 hours ago, steele153 said:

The boat in that video is like mine except my boat has two captain chairs in front and a bench seat that runs across the back with a 5.7L merc. I did some further investigating since my last post. I opened up my ski compartment and stuck my hand up toward the bow area to inspect that plywood and I can tell that it does have some damage but I don't think it is that bad not bad enough to disassemble the entire helm to repair that small of a piece of wood. I'm just hoping that my stringers are Okay and all I have to do is repair the rot which is all on the starboard side.

Well that's great news!  Question is, will that damaged plywood further up the bow get worst?  Probably.  So you'll need to find that source of water intrusion and then there are several ways to stop that plywood from getting worst ONLY once you stop the water from getting to it. 

Couple of questions.

1) Have you settled on ripping up the carpet at least up to the helm area and probably up the sides where it goes there to at least investigate the soft spot?

2)  Can you see any of the stringers when you stuck your head through the ski locker?

3) can you see anywhere near the motor mounts?  If so, how do they look?

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17 hours ago, Hatem said:

Well that's great news!  Question is, will that damaged plywood further up the bow get worst?  Probably.  So you'll need to find that source of water intrusion and then there are several ways to stop that plywood from getting worst ONLY once you stop the water from getting to it. 

Couple of questions.

1) Have you settled on ripping up the carpet at least up to the helm area and probably up the sides where it goes there to at least investigate the soft spot?

2)  Can you see any of the stringers when you stuck your head through the ski locker?

3) can you see anywhere near the motor mounts?  If so, how do they look?

I think the reason for the damage to the bow area is because when water leaked through my cover into the bow area it would run down the fiberglass and drip where the fiberglass meets the deck. I think I am okay up closer to the front of the boat. As far as the stingers at my ski locker I have banged on them and they seem pretty solid. Once I pull the carpet up and cut out the rotted decking I will check out the strings in that area. I am keeping my fingers crossed that they are Okay. I have not taken a close look at my motor mounts just yet but I should be able to see them pretty easily as it is pretty wide open back there. I plan on doing that this weekend.  

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On 8/6/2019 at 11:29 AM, steele153 said:

I think the reason for the damage to the bow area is because when water leaked through my cover into the bow area it would run down the fiberglass and drip where the fiberglass meets the deck. I think I am okay up closer to the front of the boat. As far as the stingers at my ski locker I have banged on them and they seem pretty solid. Once I pull the carpet up and cut out the rotted decking I will check out the strings in that area. I am keeping my fingers crossed that they are Okay. I have not taken a close look at my motor mounts just yet but I should be able to see them pretty easily as it is pretty wide open back there. I plan on doing that this weekend.  

Ok, definitely keep us posted. 

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