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Jessedylan

2007 5.0 Penta sx-a trim drive won’t raise or lower

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I recently took my chaparral out and landed at a sand bar so the kids could play, raised the stern drive to protect it. Went to leave- stern drive wouldn’t go back down. I can hear something running when I push the trim button up or down, but the stern drive won’t go up or down. Just the sound of a motor running. What’s the issue here?

2007 Volvo Penta 5.0 SX-A with outdrive.

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2019 at 7:02 PM, Jessedylan said:

I recently took my chaparral out and landed at a sand bar so the kids could play, raised the stern drive to protect it. Went to leave- stern drive wouldn’t go back down. I can hear something running when I push the trim button up or down, but the stern drive won’t go up or down. Just the sound of a motor running. What’s the issue here?

2007 Volvo Penta 5.0 SX-A with outdrive.

I'm sure you've figured it out by now but curious what was the issue?  Trim sender gone bad? 

I currently discovered my portside outdrive cylinder slightly leaking even though it didn't show any issues during the season and you can see the seal popping out and a bit of oil spewing out.  So I struggled to see whether to buy a whole new cylinder (pretty expensive) or order the repair kit which I did, for both since it was much more reasonable than buying the entire cylinder.  Just gotta figure out how to take the old one apart and install the new "guts" in is what I'm guessing looking at it and getting it filled with oil.  I would ask if anyone has even repaired one of these but judging by the way people responded to your question, I'm sure we'll figure it out. 

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On 10/15/2019 at 9:49 PM, Jessedylan said:

So, I went ahead and took it in to be repaired. $2K later and the entire motor had to be replaced. Works like a champ now.

Yeah had to do mine after the first season I got it when it was only 4 years old.  Wondering if it was like mine, mounted on the exterior of the outdrive assembly itself?  Terrible design by Volvo.  I slip mine in salt water every year and I can't power wash that area because of how delicate all the hoses and the gasket is, so I have to carefully and painstakingly scrape all the growth that gets on it.  Sucks.  

On 10/15/2019 at 9:50 PM, Jessedylan said:

I say motor, the hydraulic pump and hoses.

Yeah, same here but now I have this leaky cylinder but I'm actually looking forward to it after the intake manifold plate and knock sensors I just did on my TA.  That was quite the project but a lot of fun and I've never rebuilt a cylinder before.  I don't even know what I bought TBH.  I think I have to take out the entire inside of the old cylinder and put in a brand new one, not just change the gaskets and O-rings and all that PITA stuff.  Glad you're back and running.  When my sender went, the gasket basically went and oil was seeping out of the bottom and mostly resting on the transom assembly shelf.

CaZhKyt.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Hatem said:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/331837734371  That's what I ordered.  Can you tell if it's a complete replacement on the interior of the cylinder?

 

Hatem, the kit includes seals and o-rings. It doesn’t include rods, pistons, housings or bushings/pins. If your rods aren’t worn (undersized, scored or gouged) or pistons damaged, you ordered what’s needed. FWIW, it’s likely this is all you need but micing each rod and bore is best practice. When measuring the bore, three places (near end of travel on both ends and middle). We’re checking to make sure the bore is round and not oval. Since these are small bore cylinders, a telescoping I.D. mic or fixed length rod is best. Honestly, most don’t check this and it’s almost always fine. (This habit is carried over from a different day.) Regarding rods, were verifying they’re not significantly undersized over the seal riding length. Square up the seals with a drift or cup-follower when installing. Wetting the bore with some hydraulic fluid makes installation easier. Likewise, put some on the new seal lips also. Remember to flush, fill and bleed the system. Not much different than disc brakes. Scotch-Brite is to carefully and not excessively clean rods and bores. Don’t sand or use abrasives. Drilling the flag mounting hole and windlass is harder than this job.

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10 hours ago, Jessedylan said:

I say motor, the hydraulic pump and hoses.

I hope they put in a Gen2 pump for you.  The Gen1s like your boat came with are garbage.  The picture Hatem posted is a Gen1.  Notice the plug on the bottom right that's mostly hidden by the shield.  It's nylon and will leak killing the motor.  Gen2 pumps have 2 lines coming out the top and 2 coming out the sides where the plugs are on the side.

I've heard of people pulling the cover off a Gen1 pump, removing the plugs, and tapping for a steel plug that can be sealed better.  

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8 hours ago, Curt said:

Hatem, the kit includes seals and o-rings. It doesn’t include rods, pistons, housings or bushings/pins. If your rods aren’t worn (undersized, scored or gouged) or pistons damaged, you ordered what’s needed. FWIW, it’s likely this is all you need but micing each rod and bore is best practice. When measuring the bore, three places (near end of travel on both ends and middle). We’re checking to make sure the bore is round and not oval. Since these are small bore cylinders, a telescoping I.D. mic or fixed length rod is best. Honestly, most don’t check this and it’s almost always fine. (This habit is carried over from a different day.) Regarding rods, were verifying they’re not significantly undersized over the seal riding length. Square up the seals with a drift or cup-follower when installing. Wetting the bore with some hydraulic fluid makes installation easier. Likewise, put some on the new seal lips also. Remember to flush, fill and bleed the system. Not much different than disc brakes. Scotch-Brite is to carefully and not excessively clean rods and bores. Don’t sand or use abrasives. Drilling the flag mounting hole and windlass is harder than this job.

Thanks, Curt.  I would say that replacing the knock sensors on the WS6  and discovering the completely corroded valley plate and cleaning all that mess and replacing the plate was a bit more difficult than drilling that flagpole hole, despite it being at an angle and drilling an approximately 30 degree angle with a holesaw bit into fiberglass using a jig wasn't too bad.  Done a lot of crap like that through the decades but interestingly enough, I've never worked on a cylinder.  Glad to hear it's relatively easy.  Removing and replacing the intake manifold and throttle body (which btw I was strongly thinking of upgrading to a high performance FAST LSXR TB & manifold but just didn't want to put the $ into it at the time) was A LOT more difficult than drilling an angled fagpole.  Thankfully I took a lot of pictures before dismantling because I had to refer to them as I was putting everything back together.  But thanks for the advice on the cylinder work. I like the idea of a careful and soft scotch brite pad brush up and down the rods.

Here is where it's leaking right at the O-ring which if you enlarge the picture, you can actually see it popping out at the bottom which I pushed in and crumbled lol but you can also see it at the top left popping out a little.  Some corrosion at the around the interior edge is visible also.  I'm guessing the rods are good and not scratched at all, but I'll take a closer look.  I always stay away from them when cleaning and tape them when painting, but you never know.   You can really see some cracking and drying out of the Orings too.

Hey @Jessedylan, sorry your thread took a bit of a nasty turn.  Hope you don't mind me posting about my cylinder issue.  I won't reply to that last post since insulting comments like that tend to follow me every once in a while. 

B9bf9IE.jpg

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24 minutes ago, Hatem said:

Thanks, Curt.  I would say that replacing the knock sensors on the WS6  and discovering the completely corroded valley plate and cleaning all that mess and replacing the plate was a bit more difficult than drilling that flagpole hole, despite it being at an angle and drilling an approximately 30 degree angle with a holesaw bit into fiberglass using a jig wasn't too bad.  Done a lot of crap like that through the decades but interestingly enough, I've never worked on a cylinder.  Glad to hear it's relatively easy.  Removing and replacing the intake manifold and throttle body (which btw I was strongly thinking of upgrading to a high performance FAST LSXR TB & manifold but just didn't want to put the $ into it at the time) was A LOT more difficult than drilling an angled fagpole.  Thankfully I took a lot of pictures before dismantling because I had to refer to them as I was putting everything back together.  But thanks for the advice on the cylinder work. I like the idea of a careful and soft scotch brite pad brush up and down the rods.

Here is where it's leaking right at the O-ring which if you enlarge the picture, you can actually see it popping out at the bottom which I pushed in and crumbled lol but you can also see it at the top left popping out a little.  Some corrosion at the around the interior edge is visible also.  I'm guessing the rods are good and not scratched at all, but I'll take a closer look.  I always stay away from them when cleaning and tape them when painting, but you never know.   You can really see some cracking and drying out of the Orings too.

Hey @Jessedylan, sorry your thread took a bit of a nasty turn.  Hope you don't mind me posting about my cylinder issue.  I won't reply to that last post since insulting comments like that tend to follow me every once in a while. 

B9bf9IE.jpg

I didn’t make the comparison to the car, but that work is more straightforward and easier than drilling an accurate hole on an angle (including concepting and building the jig). That seal is shot. The picture kind of leads me to believe the rod is worn as well. Might just be the angle or an optical illusion though. You’ll determine when it’s miced, or if not measuring, if she leaks after new seals. Be careful not to dry run the pump.

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50 minutes ago, Curt said:

I didn’t make the comparison to the car, but that work is more straightforward and easier than drilling an accurate hole on an angle (including concepting and building the jig).

That's really interesting.  I guess it has everything to do with what you feel more comfortable with and are more used to doing.  Drill holes all the time! :)

50 minutes ago, Curt said:

That seal is shot. The picture kind of leads me to believe the rod is worn as well. Might just be the angle or an optical illusion though. You’ll determine when it’s miced, or if not measuring, if she leaks after new seals. Be careful not to dry run the pump.

The seal was the first thing I noticed since the fluid was dripping out of that location.  I raised the drive and took a few  more pics.  Not sure if I'll be "micing" it (is that a process where you have to take them to a shop and they put it in a special measuring machine for micro measurements?), but I'll keep an eye on the fluid once the repair kit is installed.  I think if it was scratched to the point where it would cause a leak, you would see an obvious scouring or some kind, right.  This looks more like the seal just had enough.  The other side looks the same but I figured it makes more sense to change them both.  Billious of blue blistering barnacles still need cleaning. 

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14 minutes ago, Hatem said:

... Not sure if I'll be "micing" it (is that a process where you have to take them to a shop and they put it in a special measuring machine for micro measurements?)...

If you have a set of mics, no need to go to a shop. Straightforward.

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3 hours ago, Curt said:

If you have a set of mics, no need to go to a shop. Straightforward.

I have a couple of calipers. :D I have one that i use a lot doing my woodworking that you probably saw while turning Denny's flag pole, but I also have a much better and more detailed one I use for my carvings and such but it doesn't have a digital readout to give you micrometers etc.  They should arrive Monday and so I'll do a step by step process on the mods thread.  Or if @Jessedylan doesn't mind, I'll post it on this thread since it's related.

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