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dh20

Engine hours - What is considered high

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Hi all,

What do you consider high hours... would you consider buying a ten year old boat with 1000 hrs?... I'm guessing that 500hrs and 1000hrs are significant milestones... Let's keep the variables simple - Documented maintenance has been performed and mechanical inspection have proven satisfactory.

When do you consider engine hours too high?

What is the life expectancy of an Merc V8? 

What would you have your mechanic inspect beyond: compression , exhaust colour, risers , gimbals, manifolds etc?

I'm looking at a fresh water 270 with almost 900hrs over 9years (seasonal use)...   boat is in great condition.  I've always sold my boats around the 500hr mark because of perceived depreciation beyond this milestone.

Curious to learn what others think.

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It makes a huge difference if it is a fresh water or salt water boat.  The salt really shortens the life of things like manifolds.  Closed and open cooling systems also make a difference.  I personally look for something with less hours on it and fresh water use.

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oHours alone CAN / should mean nothing.

I go by the CONDITION of the ENTIRE BOAT

That is what I am buying.   

The hours in the engine computer have.....SOME BEARING.

Is it the original ?  Or a new complete engine ?

wAIT 3 WEEKS.   Will be lots of used boats flooded with salt water ……………..  Reconditioned &  cream puffs for the unwary.  Low hours  on all of them.   With none computer hours .  Just dash clocks      Oh Well

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I think the real question is how many additional hours do you expect to put on her. If she is going to be a slip queen, then she may service your needs well. Secondly, are the existing engines just a little tired, or are they over extended. Manifolds and risers will need internal inspection, water pumps should be rebuilt to insure integrity, starters are due for a good rebuild, and if it's an MPI ride, then the fuel pumps would be suspect. Aluminum fuel tank/tanks are a real issue on an older boat due to E-10 fuels. Maintenance records are a good guideline, and looking at the histogram in the ECM can tell a story. How many hours spent at WOT? How many over-speed, and/or over heat events? I'd much rather have a boat with 900 hours which spent most of it's life between 3,000, and 3,500 RPM then I would buy one with 450 hours that lived at 4,600 most of the time. You did not mention what engines you are looking at and they all have their strong suits and weak points. Some friends here are approaching 2,000 hours but these boats have been maintained, and have also had some substantial work done on them at reasonable intervals. Much easier when you start off with a new boat. Compression test, sea trial, maintenance records, and a deep scan of the ECM histogram at the very least. Oil analysis can paint a picture, and if it's raw water cooled both manifolds and block castings may be getting thin and I would walk away unless it's a fresh water boat. Even then, it's time since new as much as hours of operation.  W

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The Life Expectancy of the Marine Engine

The average marine gasoline engine runs for 1,500 hours before needing a major

overhaul. The average marine diesel engine will run for more than three times

that long and log an average 5,000 hours under the same conditions. The number

of hours that a marine engine runs is very dependent on the amount and quality

of maintenance over the years.

The typical gasoline marine engine will run fine for the first 1,000 hours. It

is at this juncture that the engine starts to exhibit small problems. If these

small problems aren't addressed, they can turn into major problems which may

make the last 500 hours of life difficult to reach.

Interestingly, an automobile engine may run almost twice as long (3,000 hours)

as your marine gasoline engine. The reason is that marine engines normally work

harder and under worse conditions than automobile engines.

A well-maintained gasoline engine run under the best conditions may well run for

more than the 1,500 hours without major overhaul. However, many that operate

under the most atrocious conditions of salt air, damp bilges, intermittent

operation and pure neglect will certainly die early.

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My 2006 with 940 hours.  Always stored outside, but covered.  Condition and maintenance will tell the tale, and future usage as Wingnut (wisely) stated.  Good luck.

y4mYHyKVIXY_i4rajkApICM8ZRRrea59ls8K9cbT

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2 hours ago, Futzin' said:

My 2006 with 940 hours.  Always stored outside, but covered.  Condition and maintenance will tell the tale, and future usage as Wingnut (wisely) stated.  Good luck.

y4mYHyKVIXY_i4rajkApICM8ZRRrea59ls8K9cbT

Your boat still looks great!

Wish I had that many hours on my 220...

brick

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2 hours ago, brick said:

Wish I had that many hours on my 220...

And I wish mine was in the condition yours is...:D

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36 minutes ago, tomnjo said:

Oh boy.   :rolleyes:

ilikeyourcover...

… and your color coordination is beyond compare!

didn't want you to feel left out.  Where ya been?  Hope my 210/220 brethren are having a great summer.

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2 hours ago, Futzin' said:

ilikeyourcover...

… and your color coordination is beyond compare!

didn't want you to feel left out.  Where ya been?  Hope my 210/220 brethren are having a great summer.

Thanks Futz. We have basically had half of a summer due to this years flooding. Speaking of hours, how many hours has everyone put on theirs this year? We are up to a whopping 12.

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I'll do about 80 this year... we'll get 4 days on her starting next Thursday...

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Flooding caused us some weekends too, so we made the time up by taking 3 trips to Bull Shoals. Just got back from the last one.  Right at 50 hours total.  Tomnjo, did they have the deal on the Kaskaskia in August?  I never made it over there this year. 

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1 hour ago, SG Boater said:

Flooding caused us some weekends too, so we made the time up by taking 3 trips to Bull Shoals. Just got back from the last one.  Right at 50 hours total.  Tomnjo, did they have the deal on the Kaskaskia in August?  I never made it over there this year. 

No, the Kaskaskia Run was cancelled. The flooding was over but the ramp and courtesy docks were not ready in time.

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I'm approaching 1400 hours. This season has been awful so if I see 30 hours I'll be lucky.

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On 9/6/2019 at 3:14 PM, SST said:

I'm approaching 1400 hours. This season has been awful so if I see 30 hours I'll be lucky.

I only put 17 hours on mine this year!  Worst in history!  Between the early season weather and 2 kids playing travel ball, it was a short season for us.

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