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Labam

Floor replacement

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Hello. I have just puchased a 1987 chaparral 200 xlc. My biggest problem is a soft floor. I removed the carpet off the deck and noticed some delamination and rotted plywood. What is the best way to go aboit replacing the deck floor?

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Guess the first question is... Is the boat worth it. Could you part it out and get another one in better shape for similar.  I know there is a guy on youtub that did a detailed documentary (hours and hours of video) on youtube that was a great step by step. It's a crap ton of work if it's more then the floor. 

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Hello Labam,

I've got a 1990 1900 SL, again an older boat - lower end of the price range for this forum.  There are tons and tons of videos and websites with a lot of detail, its pretty daunting but educate yourself.  I decided to scrap my 1983 Bayliner because the transom was soft.  The Chap that I have now is very solid in most places but the floor is soft right at the helm.  I figured it had a cover that drained at the base of the windshield.  The thing is wood rot is organic and it grows, feeding on the wood.  The most important thing is that you kill it before it gets worse.  I read that Borax (cleaner) and Glycol (antifreeze) are both toxic and good home remedies for killing mold/rot.  This is sketchy internet advice, take it at face value.  I've dried my boat out a lot, and marinated all the areas in borax and antifreeze.  After several years here is what I know.  1. I didn't ruin the interior,   2. No foot rashes or skin problems,   3. The soft spots don't seem to be growing. 

Obviously the right thing to do is tear it all out and rebuild and reglass everything it touches.  You need to think about structural integrity and safety as well.   I'm on a 300 acre freshwater lake, never out of sight of shore - we are having great fun with boat for about a $1,000 a year.   Not too many people here are doing that !    Always put safety first and remember that fumes accumulate in boat hulls - no matter what you use be aware ! ! 

John

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If you sleep on the boat floor ?  Fumes of everything heavier than air will collect there.  

A small 6" box fan aimed at the people will dilute the concentration. I always had one running on the cruisers berthing area.

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Similar discussion here.  Make sure it is the floor.  May be better buying solid boat with many mechanical issues and using this as a donor for motor/drive and what not.

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I did a floor replacement in a 3 day weekend that lasted 5 years and just started showing signs of rot again. 

Easy to do and cheap. Coated exterior 3/4” plywood with fiberglass resign and then a coat of epoxy primer . Pulled carpet up and using fiberglass evercoat kitty hair glued the edges of the new wood to the old wood. Cut out the ski well and kitty hair the seams from where 2 pieces came together and carpet over and sanded smooth. Got me prolly 5 more years before a small spot came back. 

Only did to the rear seat area and took maybe 20 hours total. 

Just a suggestion to get more years out of a good engine  .

joey 

 

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22 hours ago, Labam said:

Hello. I have just puchased a 1987 chaparral 200 xlc. My biggest problem is a soft floor. I removed the carpet off the deck and noticed some delamination and rotted plywood. What is the best way to go aboit replacing the deck floor?

You really have no choice but to tear the plywood floor out completely, or at least as far as you can to the bow. Not an easy operation but if the plyd is already delaminating, then it might not be too resistant to remove because sometimes the water rot doesn't end at just the plywood and gets down lower, spreading into the bulkheads and the stringers that the floor is attached to.

If you want to keep that boat instead of taking that other member's advice and sell it and get something better, then you need to prepare yourself to a pretty major project.  Even if your bulkheads and stringers are in decent shape, replacing the floor is not as easy as it sounds.  This fella is using a material similar to nidacore called CarbonCore.  That's the white stuff you see in the bottom picture.  

However, this is a major rebuild which is far from what you will need to do (given he has basically rebuilt the entire structure below the floor ), but it gives you a good example of what you will go through if you decide to do this.  After rebuilding all the stringers & bulkheads and basically the framing where the final floor material will sit on, he went to Home Depot and bought a few sheets of OSB plywood and used that to cut a template to dry-fit to shape (you can see it at the bottom of he picture under the white material) so he can use that and trace it onto the CarbonCore, which has a relatively thin backing surfaces on each side and  honeycomb material in the middle.   You can even see the honeycomb at the close edge.  Then he'll probably laminate that surface with a few layers of laminating glass and fairing compound to strengthen and bond it to the hull side and also so that it's smooth enough to apply a sprayed-on coat of gelcaot.  You could do something similar if you don't like the carpet look or apply the laminating layers of glass and fill the edge with peanut butter and then glue new carpet on. At least then you know this stuff won't rot if it gets wet.  Hope this helps.

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