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Slip Choice Help (Docking w twin engines)

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2 slips have come available that may be slightly better than the one I am in so I am considering them and wanted to see if I was missing anything.

I can attach the map with options highlighted.

currently in dock 2 slip 42.  I don't love the way I have to back in against my forward momentum on approach and wind (prevailing winds seem to be from south or sw)

dock 2 slip 49 and dock 2 50 are are available but are end slips and against the walkway...  In your experience does this make it harder to depart since I would have a "hard boundry" since the walkway continues and might make it difficult to rotate?  Usually I fwd out of my slip until the rear is barely clear and then start my rotation.

 

Does this make sense and what are your thoughts?

 

Marina Small.jpg

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This is coming from a guy who is still perfecting docking skills but 49 and 50 seem like there is no margin for error pulling in and also leaving.

Those would scare me;)

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That echos my concerns, especially on leaving.  I think I can get in ok.  Getting out has me a little concerned because I am pressed up against the dock and if I rotate after pulling out of slip the stern will move toward the dock.  When I am at gas dock and sandwiched between boats someone from the gas dock pushes my bow out and then wife pushes stern and its a little tight to get by boats in front of me if there is any wind...

Maybe I should stay in my current slip

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I would rather be on the finger than the walkway.

Too many people walking by think they need to mind your business

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While my boat is certainly different than yours I would pick 49 or 50 simply because if you lose control hopefully the dock will save you and keep you there without having to scramble. If conditions are really bad you can just let the boat bump up against the dock and then walk it into the slip. I would rather plow into the dock than into somebody else's boat. In my opinion, 49 and 50 give you a back up if something happens.

I watch boaters trying to get into their slips with the wind pushing them away from the finger.  It can be as amusing as watching a busy launch ramp.

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18 hours ago, Upside said:

dock 2 slip 49 and dock 2 50 are are available but are end slips and against the walkway...  In your experience does this make it harder to depart since I would have a "hard boundry" since the walkway continues and might make it difficult to rotate?  

Yes, definitely a concern with the rotation factor.  Here's a question, have you watched any others with the same size boat as yours in the same end slips work their way out without bumping or scraping their swim platforms on the long dock?  If so, how do they do it?

Im guessing they must pull out and turn away to a certain degree to give themselves enough clearance for that rotation.  But man are those tight.  How many boat lengths between opposing slips?  A lot of forward and backward bumping to get that done.  As you pointed out, backing in all the way to the last slip presents similar problems. 

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There is no Upside to those crappy slips........... A canoe or rowboat is O K for those destroyer of hull sides.   And most rub rails.

A bow thruster is needed.

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Once again lots of insight from this community and has made things clearer for me.   I am going to stay put for now!!  There are other slips that come available that are more suited to my needs and will wait.  The current slip works without the potential headache!

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Actually, I would prefer one of the docks on the walkway IF there are no obstructions for your bow to pivot against that walkway (power poles, dock boxes, pumpouts, pilings, etc) and IF there is room from your slip to the opposing slip for the entire length of your boat.  Coming in with the prevailing winds is no problem, you pivot parallel, and that walkway and Mr. Prevailing Wind become your auto-docking friends.  You just back into the slip, nothing gets out of control.  When leaving, the correct way to get away from a dock that the wind is blowing you against is to pivot away on your bow, not try to pull forward and then turn as any wind will cause you to smack that stern every time.  The challenge in this situation is because you cannot back away at an angle, you will have to rotate on your bow a full 90 degrees so you'll need to make sure your bow can extend over that walkway without hitting anything.  

Othewise, stick with your slip...and if you have thrusters you can do anything you want.  :-)

 

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With twins it's just a matter of being slow and easy on the throttles. Pull out and do a ballet move to rotate the boat around until the pointy end is face out the channel. But, I agree with jeff on not wanting to deal with a bunch of people when trying to chill'.

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I have seen a old fart in a triple cockpit boat of about 28' & 6 big seniors turn the wheel & gearshift every 3 seconds.   Back into the pier slip & later, pull out with utter ability. TINY rudder on those old woodies. I smiled & clapped for his excellence. He politely bowed back.  :clapsmiley:

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I had a slip 1 away from the wall, and that sucked...that wall always came into play. I watch others in my marina that are on the wall and it is always a battle. I would say, stay where you are.

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i agree with the comments on this one as well.  stay put, as where you are it appears you can attach a spring line to the end of your pier to help with rotation vs against the wall if wind is pushing you into it there isn't a way to use a line to assist.  

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On 10/29/2019 at 11:30 PM, Upside said:

2 slips have come available that may be slightly better than the one I am in so I am considering them and wanted to see if I was missing anything.

I can attach the map with options highlighted.

currently in dock 2 slip 42.  I don't love the way I have to back in against my forward momentum on approach and wind (prevailing winds seem to be from south or sw)

dock 2 slip 49 and dock 2 50 are are available but are end slips and against the walkway...  In your experience does this make it harder to depart since I would have a "hard boundry" since the walkway continues and might make it difficult to rotate?  Usually I fwd out of my slip until the rear is barely clear and then start my rotation.

 

Does this make sense and what are your thoughts?

 

Marina Small.jpg

Personal, I would rather be blown on the dock than into some ones boat. In leaving the slip, you can always put the starboard engine into reverse to help make the turn if it becomes a problem. Or give the port more throttle too. BUT every boat or case is different.

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I have a similar situation with prevailing winds and diagonal boat wakes that want to push me into the adjacent boat in my slip.  It’s relatively easy to get out but a challenge to come back into the slip if someone is docked beside me on my starboard side.  

When returning, we always prep as soon as we enter the no wake zone by putting out fenders for insurance on the starboard side and having a line tied to the midship cleat on the port side so that my wife can hook it around the nearest cleat for leverage once we get close to the dock and help to control the bow.  We also mount a floating/telescoping hook on the dock that she can grab for emergencies.

With her at the stern and holding the rope, I back into my slip close enough for her to get onto the dock (alignment doesn’t have to be perfect) and she hooks the rope around the cleat.  By hooking the cleat, she doesn’t have to handle the full 9,000 lb weight of the boat because the cleat acts like a bit of a pulley.  She just tightens up the rope as I ease in against the wind and wakes. With her snugging the rope, I can give it some power to overcome the wind and wakes while not having to worry about driving my swim platform into the adjacent boat on my starboard side!

We’ve found that the key for us is to be prepared ahead of time...that way there is no panic if something goes sideways like a gust of wind or some yahoo flying into the marina (or plowing water) and creating a small tsunami as we try to dock....

Hope this helps :)

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My only experience is with a single engine. That said I would prefer to be docking at 49. I could easily go to the walk way and walk it in.  I would like 42 if the guys next to me were bad at docking. Seems like the guys at 51 and 52 could end up using you as a fender on a bad day. 

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2 hours ago, 2004lebanshee said:

My only experience is with a single engine. That said I would prefer to be docking at 49. I could easily go to the walk way and walk it in.  I would like 42 if the guys next to me were bad at docking. Seems like the guys at 51 and 52 could end up using you as a fender on a bad day. 

I like 42 because the prevailing wind blows you off the dock. The prevailing wind will blow you onto the dock/walkway in slips 49 & 50.

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19 hours ago, MontreAl said:

I like 42 because the prevailing wind blows you off the dock. The prevailing wind will blow you onto the dock/walkway in slips 49 & 50.

Right. I was just thinking about docking. Launching would be easier at 42 prob.

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26 minutes ago, 2004lebanshee said:

Right. I was just thinking about docking. Launching would be easier at 42 prob.

I'm am and have always been a trailer boater.

For me the wind and currents are my friends and over the years I have learned to use them to my advantage.

 99% of my boating is alone, I have tied up to many different marinas and docks, so when approaching I look for the least point of resistance, because I figure that there will be no one there to help me.

So you have to ask yourself, how comfortable am I with my girl, in tight situations.

Can I go out alone, and do I want to. Or do I always need someone with a little knowledge of what needs to be done to help me get back in, in this case is your wife.

Me, I'm a people person, a I love talking to people about their adventures and asking questions to gain knowledge of things that I know nothing about. In your case, who's who in your marina. Who knows what doors it may open.

As I see it your biggest headache is docking, everything else is secondary.

Besides i think that you are a people person to some degree, otherwise you would not be on this forum.:)

I know what I would do, or not do.   Denny

 

 

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