Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Bob L

SSX 277. Merc 380 or Volvo 380

Recommended Posts

On ‎12‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 11:02 PM, Bob L said:

Anyone considered the new ssx 257 outboard??

Why?  Look at this beauty (this is a 277 though) but the 257 is identical just a bit shorter even the latest models.  Why would you ruin it with a Yamaha blob on the sticking out of the back and the obtrusiveness it would cause, specifically this style of boat?

7147090_0_280720190753_1.JPG?t=156430555

2nd boat I looked at when I was shopping back in 2014 after the 327ssx and IIRC it had a Merc engine in it, not sure which one.  IIt was black without a wetbar just all seats all around and it's always been one of my favorites for a daytime boat.

21 hours ago, MonkeySeaII said:

My lake is 13 miles long so on a quiet day, plenty of room to open her up.  The lake is mostly runabouts and now pontoons.  I often get another bowrider try to pass me so I have to teach him a lesson! 

L-O-L!!!  Outstanding! :D 

Yeah, you need a bigger lake, my friend.  :) Maybe some day you can trailer north and we can hook up and go find Denny and maybe Delaney and check out the Great Lakes and open up all 4 or more boats!!!!  Since I know you avoid salt water like the plague looool, so naturally you have a red carpet open invitation to come up here but we're all salty dogs up this way.   But if you change your mind, it is an "open" invitation.  But I would definitely love to get the 276 into the Great Lakes and maybe even SST and Roady can join us.  The only problem is those lakes are so huge that Chaparral owners and members who live at one end and the others at the other end could be hundreds of miles!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't mind running in salt water.  Used to take my previous boat down the the Jersey Shore every summer for vacation.  Unfortunately, with 2 kids playing travel softball, I don't have the time to take the boat anywhere.  We struggle to even squeeze in boat time on our home lake.  Up until a few years ago, we took the 256 down to Lake Norman, NC for 2 weeks every summer.  Love it down there.  In our younger days, before the kids, the wife and I loved to trailer the boat to different places.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Hatem said:

He does now as it seems he's edited his posts from 6.0 to 6.2, which is a good thing.  Either he was told by one of the salesmen that it was a 6.0 and then read our exchange and your comments and realized it was a 6.2L and edited his posts, or had just made the assumption from the beginning on his own.  Either way, it's ok.  As long as he has the correct info on which engine it is.

So looking at that briefly, it says "heat exchanger to elbows" which would be hard to believe that nothing trickles back down into the manifolds, but it is noteworthy that the VP engineer himself says it right in that video of the 6.0L that the manifolds are part of the fresh water cooling circulation.  Maybe there's a check valve between the elbows and manifolds that's supposed to keep those two types of fluids separated?  Or the hose for the raw water comes in at a point where it wouldn't backtrack into the manifolds?  If raw water still gets into the manifolds, that means it's mixing with the fresh water (which I'm assuming is the antifreeze in the closed cooling circuit, right?) and that's not a good thing, I would think. 

Technicality.

In the past, it was always a manifold plus riser/elbow periodic replacement with raw water cooled exhaust, as an assembly.

Now, the manifold is fresh water cooled, but the riser/elbow still isn't, so there is still the periodic inspection and replacement chore.

They make it seem like all exhaust corrosion woes are a thing of the past, I say just some of the woes are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Toddavid said:

Technicality.

In the past, it was always a manifold plus riser/elbow periodic replacement with raw water cooled exhaust, as an assembly.

Now, the manifold is fresh water cooled, but the riser/elbow still isn't, so there is still the periodic inspection and replacement chore.

They make it seem like all exhaust corrosion woes are a thing of the past, I say just some of the woes are.

I wonder what the metallurgy is for riser and elbow. Merc uses alloy and I just re-gasketed after 11 seasons and they look new, but my salt water excursions are limited.  I do know the heat load on the exchanger on the big block engines is close to the capacity of the exchanger even with raw water cooled manifolds. I have a friend that had a single tube of his exchanger plugged completely with a stone, and his 8.1 would get hot at WOT. W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Toddavid said:

Technicality.

In the past, it was always a manifold plus riser/elbow periodic replacement with raw water cooled exhaust, as an assembly.

"In the past" which makes me feel old since that's what I have.  But, despite that, I think it eliminates the need for that huge heat exchanger that a lot of the block and other things such as the fuel pump and exhaust elbows depend on, but you certainly have the corrosion issues especially in salt water which comes with their costly replacement.  Even so, I think a closed cooling system is always better, as it maintains a better, constant engine temperature. 

2 hours ago, Toddavid said:

Now, the manifold is fresh water cooled, but the riser/elbow still isn't, so there is still the periodic inspection and replacement chore.

They make it seem like all exhaust corrosion woes are a thing of the past, I say just some of the woes are.

Not that I doubt you at all, but can I ask how you know that the rear of the manifolds are still raw water-cooled?  Is there a drain plug there to drain it?  And how is it separated from the closed cooling system?  The only thing I can think of is that it's an isolated chamber for any spillage or backflow from the elbows where the raw water hose is connected to, because there is no way that can mix with the closed cooling system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Hatem said:

Not that I doubt you at all, but can I ask how you know that the rear of the manifolds are still raw water-cooled?  Is there a drain plug there to drain it?  And how is it separated from the closed cooling system?  The only thing I can think of is that it's an isolated chamber for any spillage or backflow from the elbows where the raw water hose is connected to, because there is no way that can mix with the closed cooling system.

When I say rear of the manifolds, I am referring to the elbows/risers. 

When people do "manifold swaps", they swap the manifolds and elbows/risers as an assembly since they typically corrode at the same rate.

Even though the manifolds themselves are now closed loop cooling, the elbows/risers are not, so the corrosion issue isn't fully eliminated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember this . Any suspended  SALTS & MINERALS in water will stick to any surface that gets over about 140 F.   Nature rules.  Wingnut stated they are not rusting.  But mineral deposits will form .  A mild chemical flushing would make them like new again.  Selecting a solution with a equal but opposite PH number is all it would take..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Toddavid said:

When I say rear of the manifolds, I am referring to the elbows/risers. 

Ah, ok.  That's what confused me, the use of the term "manifolds" or their "rear part" is still (or at least I consider it) part of the exhaust manifold and the elbow or riser (which BTW is also a wrong terminology to use 'riser' for the elbow, but I know why they all do that, so that's understood) is still just the manifold, hence the confusion on my part. 

But really, they should just call them "elbows" and be done with it.  It gets confusing because for example, on my 8.1 -- and because it sits so low in the bilge in relation to the water level outside -- I have to have "extensions" and also in my case, the extensions are long as in 6" before they connect to the elbow to bring that level up high enough.  So the term 'riser' would fit much better for those extensions rather than using them as synonyms for the elbows.  I guess the elbow does bring the exhaust up a little (in some cases) and then towards the Y pipe.  But they should really simplify things.

I'm still very curious how Volvo was able to isolate the cooling of the manifolds through the closed system and use the raw water for the elbows and keep the two 'solutions' separated from one another when the exhaust flows right through the two.  So there is either a catch valve to prevent any raw water that is being injected into the elbows from back-flowing into the manifold or just the way they connect the hose/tube for the raw water into the elbow is done in a way that it forces the water to exit only, no matter what.

Either way, it's quite innovative and I would go as far as to say that it's a plus for Volvo vs Mercury, unless the latter has also developed something similar to limit the corrosion factor to just the elbows and not the manifolds.  That's huge IMO. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...