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Jerry Chadwell

Winterizing 19 H20 with 4.5 and alpha sterndrive - need advice.

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First post and need some advice please.  We've kept our boat at a storage facility for the last three years and they always did the year end winterization for us when putting the boat away.  We purchased a new home this year and are now able to store it ourselves.  Consequently, I'm doing the winterizing.  Here's where I need some advice.  Everything I've found on YouTube makes it look like I need to flush and fill the system with an RV antifreeze solution but the owners manual talks about the single point drain system and it seems simply removing the plugs and opening the valve will drain all the water out.  No water = no freeze risks/damage.  Is it that simple?  Will any water be trapped anywhere if the engine isn't brought up to operating temp to open the thermostat first.

Thanks in advance for the help!

 

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So mine says in a garage that never gets below 55* so I don’t winterize it. My previous boat that didn’t have that privilege had a MerCruiser 4.3L all I did for 5 years was open the single point drain and take the blue plugs out. Never a issue!


The down side it that supposedly not having any water in the block and heads can cause them to rust/corrode faster due to the additional oxygen. 

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WE are talking about IRON !!   Not a super thin walled O B of 200 hp.

I have just opened all the drains for the winter in outdoor unheated buildings going below 0 for weeks.. Just like millions of marina boats are done.  No damages

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27 minutes ago, Phillbo said:

I just use mine in the winter :)

large.A6294F97-3358-4C35-9AAD-9BD02C632BCF.jpeg.e1a15870522e60cab7c7ed27b0ca8626.jpegj

yeah here in Indiana we are looking at 4 more weeks at best.  

FYI, I hate the prick in the picture above.  

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The  problem you may run into is because the quick drain system becomes clogged and become the quick crack system. The problem is not so much the manifold drain hoses because there large compared to the 3/8ths hose going to the engine block

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22 minutes ago, IndyChap said:

large.A6294F97-3358-4C35-9AAD-9BD02C632BCF.jpeg.e1a15870522e60cab7c7ed27b0ca8626.jpegj

yeah here in Indiana we are looking at 4 more weeks at best.  

FYI, I hate the prick in the picture above.  

So much for this being a family forum.  Denny.

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55 minutes ago, Phillbo said:

I just use mine in the winter :)

Really happy for you Phillbo, what do you do in the off season?  Denny.

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1 minute ago, IndyChap said:

My bad, all the China SPAM may have gotten to me.  SERIOUSLY SORRY.  

No harm, we are loosing the good and the positive, because all we here is the bad and negative, and most of it is coming from the ones we put our trust in.

My girl Serenity and I are sending the day on Lake Erie fishing tomorrow, and leaving all this mess on shore.  Denny.

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I never trust the single point drains. We drain, then run pink af using a sump pump and a mortar box. We keep track of how much pink went in before it makes it out the exhaust. If we get 4+ gallons then the block did actually drain. We run that until engine gets to full temperature

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Thanks for the input everyone.  I've decided to go with just the drain.  However, I'm going to collect the water in a five gallon bucket to make sure there are no clogs.  Thanks again!

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The 2 of you bring up a serious point Wingnut made long ago about draining blocks completely..................  IF  IF you have a lot of sediment / sand sucked into the engine ?  It can settle out in the bottom of the block.  NOT GOOD. 

He recommended  checking the drains down low in the block with a piece of wire to BE SURE there is no sediment . You probably would need to unscrew the drain fitting to really check for sediment at each drain area.

When I backed into a weed covered sand bottom.   I was lucky ??   :clapsmiley:     I found no REAL amount of sand. I ran water into the thermostat casting  & only had water coming out.  Luck beats skill.     After having the complete pump replaced.

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Freeze prevention is obviously the most important part of the layover process, but there are other things you can do to assure longevity of you ride. Getting the old engine oil out now gets the acidic by-products of combustion out of the crankcase which can absorb moisture over the winter months, and those compounds have been shown to attack the lead iridium coating on the rod and main bearings over winter lay-up. Best to get fresh oil in there. Fogging the fuel system helps coat the fuel pump internals, injectors, and valve stems with a protective oil coating as well as raw iron cylinder walls. Draining the low points of the raw water system is critical, and I feel it's cheep insurance to fill the block with non-toxic marine/r/v antifreeze as it lubricates the water pump seals, and coats the raw, exposed cast iron with rust and corrosion inhibitors in a space now devoid of oxygen. Greasing the engine couple is also a good step at this time as the drive shaft is stainless and the coupler spline is aluminum. Dissimilar metals live better together when lubricated. On a raw water cooled engine, I force feed the block with a garden hose as I remove the various drain plugs to facilitate a good flush and affirm they are truly draining, and I almost always find one or two plugged. If you do not have the manuals for your ride, send me a PM and I will get them to you. Better understanding the OEM recommended procedures and the raw water coolant paths will help you to better understand what is involved in doing a proper job.  W

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12 hours ago, Denny said:

Really happy for you Phillbo, what do you do in the off season?  Denny.

Our 'Off Season" is June- Sept. We do not go to the lake unless there is a large gathering of friends on houseboats. Three things factor into our "Off Season".... Wind, Heat and Wake Boat Yahoos. 

Dec and Jan can get very cold so I typically use those months to do my maintenance since the GF does not do cold and the boat does not have a heater.... 

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23 hours ago, Wingnut said:

Freeze prevention is obviously the most important part of the layover process, but there are other things you can do to assure longevity of you ride. Getting the old engine oil out now gets the acidic by-products of combustion out of the crankcase which can absorb moisture over the winter months, and those compounds have been shown to attack the lead iridium coating on the rod and main bearings over winter lay-up. Best to get fresh oil in there. Fogging the fuel system helps coat the fuel pump internals, injectors, and valve stems with a protective oil coating as well as raw iron cylinder walls. Draining the low points of the raw water system is critical, and I feel it's cheep insurance to fill the block with non-toxic marine/r/v antifreeze as it lubricates the water pump seals, and coats the raw, exposed cast iron with rust and corrosion inhibitors in a space now devoid of oxygen. Greasing the engine couple is also a good step at this time as the drive shaft is stainless and the coupler spline is aluminum. Dissimilar metals live better together when lubricated. On a raw water cooled engine, I force feed the block with a garden hose as I remove the various drain plugs to facilitate a good flush and affirm they are truly draining, and I almost always find one or two plugged. If you do not have the manuals for your ride, send me a PM and I will get them to you. Better understanding the OEM recommended procedures and the raw water coolant paths will help you to better understand what is involved in doing a proper job.  W

Ok, now you made me change my mind...  I have all the necessary equipment and 4-5 gallons of RV antifreeze is very inexpensive insurance.  I had also already planned to change the oil and and lube everything the manual mentions.  It's been three seasons and something like 120 hours so I figured it's time.  I do still have the owners manual but thanks for asking!

I'm a life-long gearhead so none of this will be difficult.  However, it's always been cars I've worked on and modified.  This is our first boat.  The open cooling system/single point drain was a new one for me but it's straightforward.  The other piece I've not encountered before is the water separating fuel filter.  Can you give me some quick and dirty advice there.  How often to change and how to change? And anything to be careful of?  I'll have to check the manual again but I thought it was a 100 hour item?  I didn't look closely though because I was trying to figure out the flush/fill process first. 

Thanks again for all the responses everyone.   

  

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About the fuel / water filter change  in boats.      Touchy discussion point with me.  CAR gas stations  USUALLY  have very little water in them. Marinas on the other hand are a different breed.  I am part of several boating clubs groups.  Surprising  how many bad loads of watery gasoline come up.  

BUUTT

Boats DO NOT have SEALED fuel tank caps  or tank cover doors.  SOOO a lot of the water builds up in boats      Amount IS VERY DEPENDANT on the severity of rain storm. 

That filter ................!!!!!!!   It the ONLY part I change EVERY year. The boat fuel caps are CRAP !!!!!  They are at tilted angles on sloped sides.  They are known to have the vent hole at the highest point facing UP  instead of  DOWN. The water can easily go into the breather hole . Add in a old cracked or missing gasket ??  More rain dripping into the filler hose. Change it every year. I am in a none rainy area.  Rain area I would do it on a best guess schedule.  You can find out which direction you cap hole is pointing.  Put a black Marker on the upper most part of the cap.  See where the hole is. Your problem after that. 

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The fuel filter is very easy, just a pleated unit the drops in place.  It's the water separating filter unit that I'm not familiar with.  And it's all the way down on the bottom left side of the engine so I can't get a close up look at it.  Any pointers/advice/directions would be appreciated!

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