Jump to content

Another Leaking Gas Tank??


Recommended Posts

How can it be!

I bought my '08 Sig 270 in 2011 and the gas tank began leaking in December 2012. It was replaced under warranty at the factory in Nashville, GA and returned to me in April 2013.

Now, 6.5 years later, the replacement tank has begun leaking. How is that possible? I think Chaparral does not know how to install a fuel tank properly. They tried twice on my boat and failed both times.

I now have a bomb on my boat lift and hopefully the fuel removal company arrives in the AM to pump it out. This is simply irresponsible behavior by Chaparral and puts lives in danger.

I have called corporate Chaparral in Nashville, GA with no reply. No surprise there.  I will NEVER buy a Chaparral product again. I can't afford the risk.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A leaking gas tank is really scary and dangerous.

How did you identify the leak? Smell? You saw it in the engine compartment? Or?

I only ask because while I run the blowers, I never open the engine hatches to look or smell for gas.

Maybe I should....what a hassle...but the risk of not doing it sounds like if leaking, the compartment could fill w/gas and that would be catastrophic. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fishstick said:

A leaking gas tank is really scary and dangerous.

How did you identify the leak? Smell? You saw it in the engine compartment? Or?

I only ask because while I run the blowers, I never open the engine hatches to look or smell for gas.

Maybe I should....what a hassle...but the risk of not doing it sounds like if leaking, the compartment could fill w/gas and that would be catastrophic. 

A strong gas smell in the cabin alerted me to the leak. I found a mix of water and gasoline in the bilge once the engine hatch was opened. After inspecting the gas lines and pump, I concluded that the tank was leaking.  

I once did as you and ran the blowers and started the engine. I realized that looking at the engine while running provides valuable information. I had a sea-water pump leak and did not know until I started the engine with the hatch up and saw the leak. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do a Phillbo every day.  The carburetors WILL EVAPORATE FUMES every day & fill from the bottom of the boat to the top of the insides.

July & August are BAD !!  a 3 week closed up will have loads of fumes at seat height as the covers are pulled off................ I run the bilge for 5 minutes.  WITH the engine hatch closed to suck fumes.  Their are no gasoline leaks .  Carbs can smell in hot weather.  The fuel evaporates out of the carburetor fuel bowl

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been following this topic because leaking fuel tanks are serious and life threatening. I would think there would be strict regulations on Boatbuilders. Lifting the hatch to vent the bilge is great but what about while on plane?

I have been reading that water in the bilge along the sides of an aluminum fuel tank, with bilge water electricly charged , is the corrosion culprit. Add salt water and the corrosion process speeds up. Why don't Boatbuilders seal off the tank area and keep water away from sitting under the tank? Or lift up the mounts above normal bilge water depth. It sounds like a dry bilge or minimal amount of bilge water would eliminate the corrosion process.

Could another corrosion problem result from internal tank moisture? Does anyone know if these aluminum tanks corrode from the inside out? Seems like a solution to that would be a gas additive. 

Welded Stainless steel tanks would be the best but very costly. Plastic tanks used to permeate gas fumes back in the days when we stamped automotive steel fuel tanks and were competing with the plastic tank market. I think plastic has improved since the 90's. 

This is a topic I will keep researching!

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, markt111 said:

my tank appears to be loose, working in the bilge if you put weight on the right side of the tank it moves. Looks like it is secured with foam from what I can see, is there a way to secure it better?

I think the foam padding they use to "secure" the tank is a problem. Once wet, it remains in close contact with the metal and causes pitting and corrosion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aluminum has been used in boy scout canteens for thousands of years. We never had pitting with CHLORINE city water.  There is something else causing pitting holes.

Remember .........Boat companies ARE SELF REGULATED by the USCG !!!!  So crap & bad design are O K .

Link to post
Share on other sites

The USCG has APPROVED all boat companies to design &  build a safe boat. Within in BASIC guide lines  of the USCG............ Example   Ignition protected parts where it would be required.  But the company has a right to stray too far.  The failure of gas tanks is a excellent example.  Original or a replacement.  Technically Chap CAN install a USCG approved gas tank from a sunken boat.  All  USCG approved parts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...