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2003 200 ssi; questions on water temp and oil filter


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I have two questions about my boat hoping someone with more knowledge than me can help. 

Seawater cooling system, temperature gauge never gets over 150', even in summer. We had a beautiful day last weekend and with the lake water being cooler, the gauge never got over 140'. Do I have a problem, maybe a stuck open t-stat? Or is that normal? BTW, she runs great. 

Oil filter, doing my first oil change and wanting to correct oil filter. I have a remote oil filter with the filter "upside down". Some say to poke a hole in the top of the old filter to allow it to drain back to the engine before removing and some say the filter should have a one way valve to prevent the oil from leaking down to the engine. 

 

Thanks men. 

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We have a 2003 5.0 MPI Alpha. I wouldn't worry about the cooler temps, ours runs a bit cooler early in the season, too. Poke a hole in the filter and drain the oil out of the crankcase before you remove the filter. That will help but it will still be a little messy. Lay an old rag underneath it.

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6 hours ago, Cris Nauta said:

I have two questions about my boat hoping someone with more knowledge than me can help. 

Seawater cooling system, temperature gauge never gets over 150', even in summer. We had a beautiful day last weekend and with the lake water being cooler, the gauge never got over 140'. Do I have a problem, maybe a stuck open t-stat? Or is that normal? BTW, she runs great. 

Oil filter, doing my first oil change and wanting to correct oil filter. I have a remote oil filter with the filter "upside down". Some say to poke a hole in the top of the old filter to allow it to drain back to the engine before removing and some say the filter should have a one way valve to prevent the oil from leaking down to the engine. 

 

Thanks men. 

Is this a closed system or open? I would say something is wrong. Most engines like to run at the 165 to 175 range. That when they run there best, but thats me......

 

Yes, poke a hole and wait a few minutes. I always warm the engine up a little which thins the oil out. Than I use puppy pads to catch and clean up.   

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6 hours ago, cyclops2 said:

I have never understood the logic of a upside down filled oil filter .  More money for the dealers. More oil stain for the owner to be bullied into cleaning up.  

You’re doing it wrong.
I knock a hole in mine and let it drain down into the pan. It drains completely, no mess. Works great. Seems logical to me. 

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13 hours ago, Iggy said:

Is this a closed system or open? I would say something is wrong. Most engines like to run at the 165 to 175 range. That when they run there best, but thats me......

 

Yes, poke a hole and wait a few minutes. I always warm the engine up a little which thins the oil out. Than I use puppy pads to catch and clean up.   

It is an open system, 5.0 MPI. That's what I thought also, 150 degrees seems cool. 

Re the oil filter, anybody know about the filters with one way valves in them?

 

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The thing you have to understand about marine engines is they don't coast like their automotive counterparts. Like climbing a mountain and never getting to the top. As a result, the individual cylinder load is high and constant. To combat this, the builders must attempt to control individual cylinder temperatures which tend to be high. The easy fix is a cooler spark plug. These marine plugs are of a lower heat range, meaning they fire at the same temperature, but dissipate their heat much faster. Secondly, at normal cruise the fuel mapping is set at a much richer curve as you already know every time you go to fill your tank. Compression ratio is the same as a production automotive engine, however, ultimate cylinder pressure is reduced by using a higher lift camshaft to achieve desired horsepower, while spreading the lobe centers intake to exhaust, opening the intake later on the intake cycle, and getting the exhaust open early on the exhaust stroke which reduces firing pressure and excess heat. The last weapon in the bag is cooling water. Yes, some marine thermostats can be as low as 145 degrees, but that does not mean the actual cylinder temperatures are running objectionably low. As long as your ride has the oem stainless steel thermostat installed, you are right where you need to be.

As far as the oil filter goes, they are designed to self drain and poking a hole in the top speeds the process. I just wait a few minutes after shutdown, and then crack the thing loose and let it sit there for a couple minutes. W

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8 minutes ago, Wingnut said:

The thing you have to understand about marine engines is they don't coast like their automotive counterparts. Like climbing a mountain and never getting to the top. As a result, the individual cylinder load is high and constant. To combat this, the builders must attempt to control individual cylinder temperatures which tend to be high. The easy fix is a cooler spark plug. These marine plugs are of a lower heat range, meaning they fire at the same temperature, but dissipate their heat much faster. Secondly, at normal cruise the fuel mapping is set at a much richer curve as you already know every time you go to fill your tank. Compression ratio is the same as a production automotive engine, however, ultimate cylinder pressure is reduced by using a higher lift camshaft to achieve desired horsepower, while spreading the lobe centers intake to exhaust, opening the intake later on the intake cycle, and getting the exhaust open early on the exhaust stroke which reduces firing pressure and excess heat. The last weapon in the bag is cooling water. Yes, some marine thermostats can be as low as 145 degrees, but that does not mean the actual cylinder temperatures are running objectionably low. As long as your ride has the oem stainless steel thermostat installed, you are right where you need to be.

As far as the oil filter goes, they are designed to self drain and poking a hole in the top speeds the process. I just wait a few minutes after shutdown, and then crack the thing loose and let it sit there for a couple minutes. W

Darn Wing, that is good info, didn't know all that. Re, the t-stat, I will open it up and investigate. I just got this boat in April and have not dug into yet. I always questioned the 150', but when it was at 140' last weekend, it concerned me a little more. I'll get back to this post if I find anything goofy with the t-stat. 

Re the filter, all good. Sure is nice to be able to work in an enclosed garage over the winter. 

Thank you to all for the replies. 

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2 minutes ago, Cris Nauta said:

Darn Wing, that is good info, didn't know all that. Re, the t-stat, I will open it up and investigate. I just got this boat in April and have not dug into yet. I always questioned the 150', but when it was at 140' last weekend, it concerned me a little more. I'll get back to this post if I find anything goofy with the t-stat. 

Re the filter, all good. Sure is nice to be able to work in an enclosed garage over the winter. 

Thank you to all for the replies. 

Your temperature sender for your helm display is in the thermostat housing, so the indication is not really representative of what your individual cylinder water jackets are seeing. It's a reference and once you learn what your normal is, then you will know when you have a problem. My 8.1 runs at 165 indicated, and the ECM is set to alarm at 188, but by then the cylinders would be seeing something well over 200. The important thing is yours is a stainless marine unit as it lives it's life in sea water, and that it is in the proper heat range.  W 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Morning fellow boaters. I want to get back to all and provide my results. 

Oil Filter; man it was a bear to take off, previous owner must have screwed it on too tight. It was everything I had with a strap type filter wrench and I thought it was going to break. I was all set with rags, diapers and a gallon baggie, but when the filter spun off, there was a 1/4" dam that held the excessive oil. Neat, I thought until I realized it was the gasket. Haha. Oiled the new gasket both sides, spun the filter on and all good. And yes, I first poked a hole in the top of the old filter. 

Water temp; YAY, success! I pulled the old t-stat and it looked like it hadn't been changed in a while. Even with lakewater only, it was crusty and you could see a sliver of light thru it, telling me it was passing water when it wasn't supposed to. The old gasket fought me a little and came off in little brittle pieces. Book said 160' T-stat, so that's what I installed. Boy, the plastic spacer was a bear to get out!

Not the best day for the lake so I fired it up on muffs and watched the gauge. Went to 165' and stayed there. Happy camper. And no oil or water leaks either. 

So all good, I doubt if I will notice any performance increase with the engine operating at correct temperature, but figuring my gas mileage will go up some. 

Thank you all for your help. 

 

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1 hour ago, Cris Nauta said:

Morning fellow boaters. I want to get back to all and provide my results. 

Oil Filter; man it was a bear to take off, previous owner must have screwed it on too tight. It was everything I had with a strap type filter wrench and I thought it was going to break. I was all set with rags, diapers and a gallon baggie, but when the filter spun off, there was a 1/4" dam that held the excessive oil. Neat, I thought until I realized it was the gasket. Haha. Oiled the new gasket both sides, spun the filter on and all good. And yes, I first poked a hole in the top of the old filter. 

Water temp; YAY, success! I pulled the old t-stat and it looked like it hadn't been changed in a while. Even with lakewater only, it was crusty and you could see a sliver of light thru it, telling me it was passing water when it wasn't supposed to. The old gasket fought me a little and came off in little brittle pieces. Book said 160' T-stat, so that's what I installed. Boy, the plastic spacer was a bear to get out!

Not the best day for the lake so I fired it up on muffs and watched the gauge. Went to 165' and stayed there. Happy camper. And no oil or water leaks either. 

So all good, I doubt if I will notice any performance increase with the engine operating at correct temperature, but figuring my gas mileage will go up some. 

Thank you all for your help. 

 

And your valves will last longer. Cool running engines are murder on valve seats. W

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