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schmitty

I'm not that old, but I was

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I'm not that old, but I was taught to always waive at other boaters and always stop to offer assistance if someone appears to be broken down. It seems like most folks do waive when waived at, but the gesture is definately not so automatic as it used to be. And as far as someone stopping to offer assistance if you are dead in the water...GOOD LUCK!!!! Helping a fellow boater in distress used to be just part of being out there on the water. It can be just as fun as a raft up, helping them solve their problem, sharing a cold one and stories. Isn't that what boating is all about? Old school boaters seem to be a dying breed. Has anyone else noticed this or is this a localized problem around So. Cal.? I love my local boating spots and will continue to boat as I always have, but would like to see the comradery come back. :drinkinBuddies:

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While I don't think it's localized in your area, I think it may be worse there than most places i've been. I'm not all that old myself and I too was raised around boating with those same set of values. Here in the (real) mid-west, I encounter nearly all of the same. Once in a while there will be a jerk, and of course there is the ever present jet-ski types who are nearly always inconciderate, self absorbed jerks. Having said that, I will say that I've seen a trend since I was a boy that seems to be slowly pulling away from that "good ol' days" attitude you spoke of. Sure hope it's not "catching", because that is one of the reasons I got my family into boating. Sure the nature, sun, fun and family time is great. But that sence of boating "brotherhood", in my opinion, is a fantastic learning environment for kids - and adults too.

JC

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I have noticed the same trend on our lakes.

There are some who lend a hand to a fellow boater in need, and many who either don't want to take the time or perhaps want to avoid the liability if something goes awry. I think this has a lot to do with the change in attitude not only in boating, but many other situations. The litigious society that we live in has a negative affect on our lives in many ways.

Whoa....ooof! Owww, fell off the soap box...back to boating.

:drinkinBuddies:

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. . . .The litigious society that we live in has a negative affect on our lives in many ways.

Whoa....ooof! Owww, fell off the soap box...back to boating.

:tofunny::tofunny:

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The point about the jet ski mentallity is a good one. Don't get me wrong, I sure can have a really good time on a wave runner, but they are bringing a whole new type of person to the waterways. Many surfers out here like to say that the leash ruined surfing; allowing too many to take it up. I feel the same way about personal watercraft. They are a ton of fun, but they have a way of turning people into idiots. Then, these people carry that mentality on to boats and, worse yet, have begun "teaching" the next generation of boaters their ways.

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Don't get me started on jet skiers and the like... I've witnessed first hand two deaths due to jet skier negligence; one, I rendered assistance and my wife at the time performed CPR on the decedant for almost 45 minutes before we were able to get back to shore where I had contacted authorities and Emergency Personel were waiting to take over.

To that end, I too have witnessed much ignorance when it comes to our youth taking to the waterways. I pulled my stint in the Navy aboard a couple of submarines and understand well the value of being fully qualified on all ship/boat systems, emergency procedures, Rules of the Road, and simply rendering assistance. I guess I'll always feel if you don't know what you are doing on the water and can't respect applicable statutes requiring they render assistance, you have no place on the water to begin with. To my knowledge, most if not all states have statutes requiring boaters to render assistance to other boaters and 46 U.S.C. 2304 require individuals in charge of a vessel to render assistance while at sea. The term "render assistance" doesn't necessarily mean you have to give a tow, but you should render reasonable assistance even if you have to relay a message for help.

But, I agree with previous postings here, if you are cruising along and see someone with the engine hatch up and you can't see them throwing a ski rope in the water, a fellow boater should be courteous enough to wave and ask them if everything is alright. You never know when you may be the person needing a tow... I would also agree, a boater in distress or dead in the water should be knowlegeable enough to fly a day/night signal as appropriate.

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I haven't really noticed a downturn in civility. At times, while at Napatree or Block Island it can get testy if someone drops a hook too close to another boater though. We send and receive nods and wave often enough, especially while in the channel form and to our mooring. But out on the wide open LIS, well it just too big and there are many many boats.

If I see someone I believe may need a hand I will stop and have had others stop and ask if we're okay.

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We should all practice this, especially on the water...

lens1846469_1235066746randomsign.jpg

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I too am an old school boater raised that way. Now i'm teaching my children the same thing. There is always at least one of us if not all of us that wave when passing another boat. I want to say a high percentage of people wave first or wave back.

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I believe in Karma, and believe that kindness is returned in kindness, humility with humility, rudeness with rudeness. Not to get religious or philosophical (because I am not), but you "reap what you sow".

fll_dude

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I always wave and generally get a wave back. Of course there are always exceptions. Agree with all the comments above about jet skiers. They just don't care about anyone but themselve. And don't get me started on adherence to no wake zones.

I've had the opportunity to help a few folks on the lake and have done so (heck even NJ Hank has done that). I recall one nice weekday evening I went out into the main channel and turned off the engines just to relax with a book. While I was doing this, 2 boats came over to ask if I was in trouble and needed help. I only wish 90% of boaters were as considerate as these 2 were.

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I haven't really noticed a downturn in civility. At times, while at Napatree or Block Island it can get testy if someone drops a hook too close to another boater though. We send and receive nods and wave often enough, especially while in the channel form and to our mooring. But out on the wide open LIS, well it just too big and there are many many boats.

If I see someone I believe may need a hand I will stop and have had others stop and ask if we're okay.

My experience is similar to Winemaker's. Most boaters (owners) on Lake George are friendly and courteous to other boaters. Oftentimes when at one of the public docks the Admiral and I just start BS'ing with other boaters, then my daughter asks do you know them? We answer - we do now! Definitely think there is still a "brotherhood" (gender neutral) among owners.

Where we do see a level of ignorance is with renter's - which are easily spotted. Not necessarily a question of them being friendly or not - just that they generally don't know the rules.

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I wave at everyone when out at the lake, if they get close enough I will even give them a Hello. I would never pass up a chance to help someone on the the water that needs it. Never know when you will need help. With all that said, I will also let someone know that they have crossed the line with their actions!

fluffykitten.gif

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I have been real fortunate. I have found most to be friendly and available to help. A percentage of jet skiers make very poor choices, but they probably make equally poor choices on land. I like some of the thoughts above which really relate to setting the example - it can be contagious.

I can't imagine a gent passing a vessel in need of assistance.

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By and large most boaters I see on Mead, Mohave & Powell tend to wave when we pass.....no doubt the jet skiers are by and large an obnoxious group, and the bigger and faster the mfg's make personal watercraft the more danger we are all in.

I would suggest that the vast majority of PWC operators and the offending boat owners who don't display the old fashioned manners and behavior have probably never taken a boating class or test in their life.

Somehow it seems to be a part of society's it all about "me" thing, and or no one is out there teaching the proper etiquette......I see it on the golf course all the time....ball marks not fixed, divots left un-sanded, bunkers not raked.....actually had a "far-east" guy tell me after I suggested politely that he return to the bunker to rake it....."I no gardener, I no rake bunker"....shortly after that I was a little more direct and suggested while he may not be a gardener, he might get turned into a Popsicle if he didn't get back in the bunker and rake it.

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I was taught by both my Grandfather & Father that you should always offer help to other boaters that may be in need. Therefore, I do. I have towed boaters, jet skiers & even canoes back to the dock. I like to think that if I am in need that the same assistance would be extended. We do wave and have found that in most instances we get a return wave. Of course there are a few exceptions from those who I quess think they are above being friendly.

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We always stop to check on boats that appear stopped in the middle of the channel to check on them. We also always pick up trash we find floating in the lake so that someone else does not run over it and potentially harm their hull or drive.

Last summer when my boat quit while leaving our channel, we floated over to a person's dock. She came outside to check on us to make sure we were ok, and then offered and provided us with a tow back to our marina. She was clearly involved in other things, but she stopped to offer assistance to a boater in need. She would not take anything from us then, so Mrs Dox and I figured out where her house was on land, and took her a basket of cheese and some wine to say thanks.

Most boaters do seem friendly. As for PWC riders, they typically do not wave, but quite honestly I would prefer that they did not wave and kept their hands on the steering bars so as to keep control of their PWC. Don't want or need them crashing because they were waving.

no_drink.jpg

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I wave at most of the boaters when we pass them. Some return the wave, some give you a hard stare, and some are just oblivious. I try to be friendly around the docks, and enjoy meeting new people. Unfortunately not all of our neighbors are that friendly.

I can say that the boating manners and abilities around the LA/Long Beach harbor area has been deteriorating over the last few years. No one seems to either know or obay the rules of the road, and very few people will stop to check on a boat that is stopped. Too many jet skiers, kyakers, and others that ignore the rules and do whatever they want, and can't understand why other boaters are yelling at them.

According to the Coast Guard rules, you are required to stop and render assistance to a boater in distress. This does not mean a tow, but calling the CG, Harbor Patrol or a towing service, and staying with the other boat until help arrives. I have done this in the past, including rescuing a kyaker in danger of drowning.

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We always wave. We chat as much as possible. You can never have too many friends on the water.

Prior to the Chap I had classic boats so I've had my share of tows. I'm always looking to return the favor.

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We always wave at fellow boaters but don't always get a response !! I think that's just rude. We have'nt had to help anyone in distress, but would be more than glad to give assistance if needed. I agree with the other posts you just don't know when you'll be the one in need of assistance !! Happy and Safe Boating everyone !! Have a grreat summer !!

:D

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I wave at everyone when out at the lake, if they get close enough I will even give them a Hello. I would never pass up a chance to help someone on the the water that needs it. Never know when you will need help. With all that said, I will also let someone know that they have crossed the line with their actions!

fluffykitten.gif

totally agree,

I have probably helped as many boaters in the water as I have on land over the years, especially showing green horns how to retrieve there boats .

and I have been helped a number of times over the years. its all part of being out there.

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totally agree,

I have probably helped as many boaters in the water as I have on land over the years, especially showing green horns how to retrieve there boats .

and I have been helped a number of times over the years. its all part of being out there.

So how many boaters have you helped on land over the years. :rolleyes::tofunny:

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anyone I can, I don't keep track but its been lots, we have a pretty nice bunch of people where I boat, can't say enough good about the people and there the type that appreciate it. why let something simple ruin someones day.

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